Catalog
2013-14

School of Education & Health

Mission

The School of Education is committed to the mission of Manhattan College to provide a contemporary, person-centered education that embodies the LaSallian traditions of scholarship, excellence in teaching, respect for individual dignity, and commitment to social justice. The additional goal is to prepare self-directed, reflective, scholarly professionals dedicated to the highest standards for themselves and those they serve. Professionals are prepared in the fields of Counseling, School Leadership, and Childhood/Special Education (Grades 1-6).

Application Procedures

Application forms for admission to all programs in the School of Education may be obtained from the Graduate Education Office, from the School of Education web site (http://www.manhattan.edu/academics/graduate/index.shtml), or from the Office of Admissions. The completed form accompanied by the application fee (non-refundable) must be submitted to the Office of Admissions. Applicants for admission are responsible for having official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate courses mailed directly to the Office of Admissions, paying the application fee, submitting letters of recommendation, and if required, standardized test scores.

Official transcripts (not student copies) of all undergraduate records must be sent to the Office of Admissions by the institutions issuing them. Applicants who file an application before the baccalaureate degree has been conferred may be accepted pending the successful completion of their undergraduate work. A final transcript must be received in the Office of Admissions before they register for graduate courses.

Graduates of Manhattan College should write to the Office of the Registrar requesting that an official transcript be sent to the Office of Admissions.

An application is not complete until all the necessary materials and application fee have been received by the Office of Admissions. Incomplete applications cannot be processed. Students who file an application and whose official transcripts arrive after the deadline date cannot be assured that their application will be processed in time for the semester for which they are applying.

The filing should be completed before April 1st for summer session application; July 10th for fall session applicants, and December 7th for spring session applicants.

The Director for the program for which a person is applying reviews the application and supportive documents and forwards a recommendation to the Dean of Education. This recommendation is sent to Office of Admissions for processing. The Office of Admissions then informs the applicant of the decision. Those who have been accepted will receive the instructions for registration at the beginning of the session for which they have been accepted.

The documents submitted in support of application cannot be returned to the applicant and can not be duplicated for any purpose. All documents received are part of the records of the College.

Admission

Applicants for admission into any graduate program in the School of Education must hold a baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or institution acceptable to Manhattan College. In addition, they must meet the specific requirements as stated in the introduction to the respective programs. Normally, an undergraduate grade point average of 3.00 on a 4.00 scale is required, although other factors can be considered in the decision for admission.

Admission into graduate education programs will be granted as a matriculated student, one seeking to fulfill the requirements of a degree. A student may be granted permission to take an approved graduate course on a non-matriculated basis or, in special cases, as an auditor. A non-matriculated student is one earning graduate credit for a specific course but not necessarily working for a degree. For example the student may be interested in earning a Graduate Certificate or continuing education units or completing credits for other professional reasons. For both non-matriculated and auditing students, tuition and fees are the same as for matriculated students. A non-matriculated fee also applies.

A student who lacks undergraduate prerequisites for a specific program may be asked to complete certain undergraduate courses as a non-matriculated student. Students requesting to take graduate courses as a non-matriculated student must have the necessary prerequisites for those courses. Students may not register for more than 12 credits as a non-matriculated student without the permission of the Dean of the School of Education.

Students who take graduate courses at Manhattan College on a non-matriculated basis and apply thereafter for admission to a graduate program as a matriculated student will be informed at the time of acceptance which courses may be applied to that degree program.

Students who have earned a master's degree or who are pursuing a master's degree in one education program from Manhattan College and desire to seek admission into another program must file a new application with the Office of Admissions.

All documents of applicants who have been accepted and who for extenuating circumstances cannot register for courses during the session for which they were admitted will be kept on file for two years. The documents will be destroyed if the applicant does not register for courses within the two year period.

Visiting Students

Students who are matriculated in a graduate program at another institution and who wish to take a course (or courses) at Manhattan College may do so as non-matriculated students for individual courses for which they have prerequisites. For non-matriculated students, tuition and fees are the same as for matriculated students. A non-matriculation fee also applies.

Applicants from Foreign Countries

The College accepts students from foreign countries for its full-time graduate programs in the School of Education. In general, the College cannot accept students into its part-time graduate programs. The student who is accepted and receives a student visa must be enrolled in each term of the academic year for 9 credits (three 3-credit courses). Such students must complete the program within 18 months.

Applicants from foreign countries should submit their admission application, official transcripts, and the admission fee four months before the beginning of the session they wish to enter. In addition, they must submit a notarized statement that they have sufficient funds to finance their education and their maintenance. Many of the sources of financial assistance are limited to the residents of the United States.

All students applying from foreign countries must take the TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) and have the test results sent to the Office of Admissions. A minimum TOEFL score of 213 (550 for paper exam) will satisfy Manhattan College admission requirements and criteria for issuance of the I-20 form.

A student from another country who is informed of acceptance must deposit $300 which will be credited toward tuition. This fee is non-refundable if the student does not register but will be credited to his/her account for two years. When the $300 is received, the student will be sent an I-20 form which must be presented to the United States authority to arrange for an F1 student visa.

Objectives

The Graduate School of Education is committed to the preparation of Human Service professionals through courses leading to the master degree and/or advanced certificates: 

  • The Master of Arts program in Counseling is directed toward work in counseling with a view to preparing the candidate for the role of counselor in schools.
  • The Master of Science in Mental Health Counseling program is directed toward work in agency, hospital or other service related placements.
  • The Teacher Education Program (M.S. in Ed.) is directed toward the professional preparation of teachers of disabled individuals, including but not limited to the mentally retarded, the emotionally disturbed, the physically disabled, the neurologically impaired, the multiply disabled and those with specific learning disabilities in grades 1-6.
  • The Dual Program prepares teachers to work with children in grades 1-6 in the general as well as Special Education settings.
  • The School Leadership Program (M.S. in Ed.) is directed toward the professional preparation of school building leaders, administrators and supervisors, assistant principals, department chairs, coordinators, unit heads, and the like.
  • Post Masters (Professional Diplomas) are offered in counseling, special education, and school leadership.
  • Certificates in Bilingual Pupil Personnel Services, College Advising Counseling, and Teaching and Learning with Technology are also offered.

General Admission Requirements

In addition to the special requirements that may be listed for various programs, candidates must:

  • Earn a baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or institution acceptable to Manhattan College and normally meet or exceed an undergraduate grade point average of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale. Other factors will be considered for admission, such as years of professional experience, a high average in major field, scores on required standardized tests, or academic development beyond the baccalaureate degree. Candidates who have not taken the prerequisite coursework may be required to take graduate courses that are not part of the degree program.
  • Meet any additional requirements for a specific program.
  • Submit the following: application form, transcript, one page handwritten Narrative Statement of Interest in the specific program, resume and letter of reference, preferably from a professional colleague or professor. In the case of Counseling programs, two letters of reference are required.
  • Schedule an interview with the director of the specific program with the exception of Counseling where an interview is not required.
  • Applicants interested in a graduate assistantship should request information about graduate assistantship by contacting the Education office or in the case of Counseling, the Director.
  • Applications for admission will be reviewed by the Program Director and the Dean of the School of Education.

Matriculation Status

Admission will be granted as a matriculated student, one seeking to fulfill the requirements for a master degree or professional diploma or as a non-matriculated student, one earning graduate credit for specific courses but not for the degree. Normally participants are not allowed to continue in a non-matriculated status beyond 12 credits. Non-matriculants are charged a fee.

Seniors in the undergraduate Education program at Manhattan College who have completed their undergraduate requirements may, with the written consent of the director of their programs and the Dean of Education, be admitted to appropriate graduate level courses except in Counseling.

Transfer Credit

The Graduate Education Programs at Manhattan College are designed with a developmental emphasis. Assessment is ongoing and performance based. Therefore, a matriculated student is expected to earn all the credits for the program at the College. Transfer of credits will only be considered for compelling reasons. In such cases, students should submit an Off Campus Course Approval Form to their Program Director who will forward it with a recommendation to the Dean. Participants must obtain written approval prior to enrolling in the course.

Degree Requirements

To obtain a master degree from the School of Education students must:

  • File the Intent to Graduate form with the Program Director by the due date during the semester before graduation.
  • File the Application to Graduate form with the Registrar in the final semester of course work.
  • Give evidence of having met program standards through periodic performance reviews.
  • Undertake and complete a research based project/paper under the direction of a faculty member. The topic must be related to the participant's program of study and approved by a faculty advisor as part of Methods of Education and Psychological Research. The major paper must be completed in (for Special Ed and School Leadership) or for Counseling, submitted, and a final draft tentatively approved before registering for the seminar or the following courses: , , . Final approval including sign-off by a faculty advisor is required in order to graduate. Candidates must carefully follow the format of the American Psychological Association, and must submit completed papers according to the timeline for graduation: January 15 for May, June 15 for September, and October 15 for February. The approved major paper must be placed on file in the Graduate Education office.
  • Earn the required number of credits for the program, successfully complete each course and demonstrate mastery of the professional knowledge, dispositions and skills for the specific degree and/or certification with a cumulative index of 3.0 or better.
  • Undertake a practicum/internship if required. These experiences, including the seminars and reports related to them, are designed to integrate the theory, research and practice developed throughout the program.
  • Pay and clear all outstanding financial accounts including library and graduation fees owed the College.

New York State Certification

School Counseling, Special Education, School Building Leadership, Administration and Supervision Certifications

The Graduate Education Programs have been approved by the New York State Department of Education to offer course work leading to Certification as a Special Education or dual Childhood/Special Education Teacher, School Building Leader, or School Counselor. The graduate program in Mental Health Counseling is approved by the New York State Office of Professions as license qualifying

To be eligible for certification or license qualifying, the candidate must:

  1. Complete all course work with a cumulative index of 3.0.
  2. Complete the New York State approved program in the certification or license qualifying area.
  3. Successfully complete, if required, student teaching, practicum or internships as evidenced by observations from the field and college supervisors.
  4. Successfully complete the appropriate sections of the New York State Teachers Examination, LAST, ATS-W & CST where applicable if graduating prior to February 2014.  After February 2014, the following exams must be successfully completed: Acadmeic Literacy Skills Test (ALST), Educating All Students test (EAS), the e-portfolia TPA, along with the appropriate CST exams.
  5. Complete the application for certification form (which may be obtained from the Dean's Office or online) or the required form for a "limited permit" at the end of the Mental Health Counseling program and payment of required fees.
  6. Be recommended by the Dean of the School of Education, the state certifying officer. Candidates possessing provisional New York State certification in Childhood Special Education or School Building Leadership may merit permanent/professional certification upon completing the degree program provided they have satisfied the New York State requirements regarding length of service. Students in Special Education must pass the appropriate New York State Education Department tests, LAST, ATS-W, ATS-P and CST if required if graduating prior to February 2014. After February 2014, the following exams must be successfully completed: Acadmeic Literacy Skills Test (ALST), Educating All Students test (EAS), the e-portfolia TPA, along with the appropriate CST exams.  .
  7. Complete the training in Child Abuse Recognition and Reporting and SAVE legislation required for new and renewed certification. Such training is provided in all degree programs through specified courses or online through the State for Counseling. Candidates for certification must take the necessary course at the college or from a state approved provider to fulfill this New York State mandated requirement for certification.

Changes in certification requirements issued by New York State Education Department will take precedence over and replace those presented in this catalog. Those seeking New York State certification are responsible for knowing and meeting all State requirements for their specific programs.

Job Opportunities for Special Education Teachers, School Administrators and Counselors

According to the National Center for Education Statistics' Predicting the Need for Newly Hired Teachers in the U.S. to 2008-2009, nationwide some 2.4 million teachers will be needed in the next 11 years because of teacher turnover, retirement, and rising student enrollment.

Courses

EDUG 600. Orientation to School Building Leadership. 0-3 Credit.

This "0" credit course is required for all those admitted to the School Building Leadership (SBL) program and should be taken within the first six credits. This orientation addresses Course Related Leadership Activities (CRLA), the Leadership Experience (the Internship), EDUC 889, and the required documenation for the program completion.

EDUG 700. Lasallian Educational Practice and Philosophy. 3 Credits.

An examination of the life and educational contributions of John Baptist de La Salle. The course will examine "The Catholic School" and specifically "The Lasallian School." Pedagogy, curriculum, spirituality, social action and the training of new teachers will be discussed.

EDUG 704. Introduction to Group Dynamics and Human Relations. 3 Credits.

Experiential study of factors that provide a climate of freedom for personal expression; exploration of feelings; interpersonal communication and diversity through group analysis of current community problems; emphasis on the atmosphere conducive to interaction among group members; dynamics for innovative and constructive behavior; theory and practice in treatment and elimination of conflict, especially in intergroup-intercultural problems. Three credits.

EDUG 705. Orientation to Alcohol and Substance Abuse Counseling. 3 Credits.

An introduction to alcohol and chemical dependency counseling with an emphasis on major aspects of the field such as the disease concept, the importance of self-help groups in the recovery process, ethical principles that impact on alcohol and substance abuse counseling, Federal and State confidentiality laws, and client HIV status as it pertains to confidentiality.

EDUG 706. Alcohol and Substance Abuse: Evaluation, Treatment Planning and Case Management. 3 Credits.

An in-depth study of the essential components of alcohol and drug assessments, their importance in the treatment planning process, the development and implementation of behaviorally-oriented treatment plans and the coordination of services for clients through case management activities. The variety of treatment opportunities for clients based on their individual needs will be studied.

EDUG 708. Physical and Psychopharmacological Aspects of Alcohol and Substance Abuse. 3 Credits.

An examination of how alcohol and other substances affect physical health, including the brain and the individual's cognitive functioning. Specific emphasis will be placed on the pharmacological effects of alcohol and other substances of abuse. Specific illness commonly found among this population such as AIDS, tuberculosis and other communicable diseases will be discussed.

EDUG 709. Alcohol and Substance Abuse Counseling Family Issues and Treatment Approaches. 3 Credits.

A comprehensive review of the literature pertaining to the effects of alcoholism and other substance abuse on the family system. Individual and group treatment approaches employed within the family system, including co-dependency groups, Al-Anon, Alateen, and other services for children of alcoholics and substance abusers will be discussed.

EDUG 710. Current Issues. 3 Credits.

An examination of how certain influences affect our understanding and treatment of alcohol and substance abuse.

EDUG 711. Multiple Disorders. 3 Credits.

A comprehensive examination of psychiatric disorders and the nomenclature of DSM-IV. Issues pertaining to the ways that various mental disorders complicate the evaluation and treatment of alcohol and substance abuse will be studied. Specific treatment interventions with certain groups of dually-diagnosed individuals will be provided. Specific attention will be paid to the treatment of poly-substance abusers.

EDUG 712. Counseling the Single Parent Family. 3 Credits.

Examination of the needs of children and parents in single parent families; distinctions made among single parent families' problems brought about by divorce, separation, death, annulment and out-of-wedlock children.

EDUG 713. Methods of Educational and Psychological Research. 3 Credits.

In EDUG 713, students learn a variety of common research designs in education and psychology, develop the ability to evaluate primary research, and design a research project. Research designs covered include experimental, causal-comparative, correlational, and qualitative, and their applications to needs assessment, program evaluation, outcomes research, and action research. Students would use their knowledge on research designs to evaluate literature related to their research topic and complete the introduction, literature review, and methods sections for their research projects. Research topic must be related to the student's specific program and approved by the course professor. To complete the remaining research project and paper, students in Counseling will take EDUG 851 and those in Special Education and School Building Leadership will take EDUG 888.

EDUG 714. Psychology of Career Counseling. 3 Credits.

Techniques of counseling different populations in a variety of settings. The course will address the role of work, job seeking techniques, the use of assessments, value clarification methods, and design of programs.

EDUG 715. Marriage and Family Counseling. 3 Credits.

Examination and application of the theory, practice and utilization of marriage and family counseling techniques.

EDUG 717. Stress Reduction Techniques. 3 Credits.

Study of the causes and characteristics of stress. Examination of different approaches and techniques for stress management that can be employed by the counselor.

EDUG 718. Technology, the School Counselor and College Advisor. 3 Credits.

This course gives students the opportunity to learn important technologies related to school counseling including an examination of best practices in use of Naviance; a second component of the course will focus on critical examination of college choice. Examination of software for programming, record keeping, testing, reference, referral, and networking for internal and external communication will be included.

EDUG 721. Introduction to Counseling Practices and Theories. 3 Credits.

The student will be introduced to the field of counseling by examining the major theories of counseling. In comparing and contrasting these theories, it will become clear what makes each approach unique and what all of these approaches have in common. Through this process, the student will begin to develop a personal theoretical orientation to counseling. The course will also consider personal qualities needed to be an effective professional counselor and common ethical issues that arise in the practice of counseling.

EDUG 722. Techniques in Counseling the Individual. 3 Credits.

Techniques of counseling the individual client will be studied and practiced. The course will examine the full process of counseling from initiation through termination. The student will learn how to establish a rapport with the client and how to work with difficult clients. The student will develop the skills to help the client explore problems, gain insight to those problems, and convert that insight into action.

EDUG 723. Life Span Development: Child, Adolescent, and Adult. 3 Credits.

Comprehensive review of major theories of human development from pre-natal period through senescence. Critical tasks and aspects of growth for each period will be explored. Particular emphasis will be placed on cognitive and psychosocial development and how children, adolescents, and adults are affected differentially by various learning and emotional disabilities. Focus will also center on the link between research and practice of counseling and special education including multicultural research, satisfies the requirement for S.A.V. E. and child abuse.

EDUG 724. Career Development. 3 Credits.

Practical application of major career development theories related to the world of work. Topics include: career assessment tools, information resources and the decision-making process. Trends, exploration of classification systems and, program development for counseling in the schools.

EDUG 725. Practicum in Groups. 3 Credits.

Discussion, evaluation, and demonstration of types of group counseling techniques; analysis of group dynamics; group counseling as it applies to educational, interpersonal and emotional problems, including alcohol, and substance abuse problems. The use of 12-Step self-help groups in recovery.

EDUG 726. Foundations of Mental Health Counseling. 3 Credits.

This class will provide students with an introduction to the roles, functions, and professional identity of mental health counselors in a variety of clinical settings. Students will develop a basic working knowledge of bio-psychosocial mental health assessment and diagnosis. Students will develop a basic working knowledge of the principles of current diagnostic tools. Students will develop a basic knowledge of commonly prescribed psycho-pharmacological medications. In addition, the course will focus on a survey of community agencies, organizations and resources.

EDUG 727. Organization and Administration of the Guidance Program. 3 Credits.

Principles and problems in the organization, administration and evaluation of guidance programs at all levels; analysis of the role, responsibilities and duties of administrators, counselors, school psychologists, and teachers; computer applications for the guidance program for student support services including those with disabilities and who are English language learners. Field experience. Satisfies the requirement for S.A.V.E. legislation.

EDUG 728. Alcohol and Substance Abuse Counseling-Internship and Professional Development Seminar. 3 Credits.

Placements will be required within a licensed alcohol or substance abuse treatment agency, either inpatient or outpatient for a minimum of 150 hours. The internship experience will include the evaluation of clients, participation in counseling groups and individual counseling sessions with clients at the chosen treatment setting. A review of treatment sessions will be conducted with the student by the internship supervisor. As part of the internship experience, topics pertaining to the counselor/client professional relationship, transference/counter-transference issues, role boundaries and the use of clinical supervision as an ongoing aspect of practice will be the major focus of the internship experience. Minimum of 150 hours in the field. Prerequisite: Matriculation, 27 credits and permission of the Program Director and Director of Graduate Education.

EDUG 729. Professional Writing. 0-3 Credit.

This course id designed to enable the student to gain experience in professional writing and refine their writing skills. The emphasis will be on developing the organization and synthesis abilities required for more advanced writing demands in counseling, special education, or Leadership, including psychological reports, exposure to grant writing and program evaluations. While the course will also address issued related to grammar, and the APA style manual, it will emphasize improvement in writing with clarity and professionalism.

EDUG 730. Curriculum, Strategies, and Technology for the At Risk, English Language Learner [ELL] and Disabled.. 3 Credits.

A practicum to improve school success of at risk, ELL and disabled students within the inclusionary setting. Review of Common Core Learning standards in ELA and mathematics, NYS Content and Performance Standards for Social Studies and Language Arts; emphasis on teaching strategies; differentiated instruction; modification of curriculum materials; application of instructional technology; a curriculum based project is required. Permission of the Director of Special Education required. Three credits.

EDUG 731. Counseling the At Risk, Disabled Student and Family. 3 Credits.

Overview of trends and legal rights of the disabled; implication for counseling with regard to the special vocational, educational, social and emotional needs of the disabled; survey of programs, agencies, and services for the disabled.

EDUG 732. Practicum in Counseling. 3 Credits.

Advanced counseling practice with clients under the supervision of the faculty. Integrated seminar with case conferences designed to enable students to develop skills in case conceptualization, consultation, individual and group counseling. Minimum of 100 hours of experience required. Satisfies the requirement for S.A.V.E. and Child Abuse recognition and reporting. Prerequisites: 12 credits and permission of Advisor.

EDUG 733. Approaches to Multicultural Education for the At Risk and Disabled Student. 3 Credits.

Introduction to multicultural education, cultural diversity, and equity issues through examination of race, ethnicity, social class, gender, disabilities and sexual orientation and their impact on curriculum and classroom instruction. Best practices and multicultural materials explored.

EDUG 735. Educational Leadership, Decison-Making, and Change. 3 Credits.

Leadership styles and decision-making models and their implications for the role of district and school leaders and supervisors at all levels as change agents and visionary leaders; exploration of what it means and what it takes to be a school leader; organizational patterns (line and staff) and group dynamics (formal and informal); the school as a social (power) system; use of case studies, simulation and role play. Course related leadership activities required. Offered May/June, 2013.

EDUG 736. Issues in Educational Administration and Curriculum. 3 Credits.

Analysis/discussion, lecture, collaborative learning, intensive study, field experience related to issues for developing or enhancing administrative and curricular leadership for the district or school leader, assistant principal, and department chairs. Participants present evidence of knowledge, skills and dispositions for effective leadership in diverse educational settings. Course projects that promote collaboration, communication, and planning with parents, students, staff, and community leaders may include action research, strategic planning, change processes, design for staff development, computer application and/or multimedia presentations. Program portfolio and publication or multimedia presentation required. This course is an elective for the master degree.

EDUG 737. Staff Development. 3 Credits.

Concepts, theories, principles of adult learning for application to district and school based professional development; design and evaluation of new and existing staff development programs; use of staff development programs for team building, succession planning and collaboration; emphasis on district and school wide technological integration for effective standards based teaching and learning that helps students meet state standards. Developing and enhancing visionary instructional leadership by infusing instructional technology. Designed for educational leaders, staff developers, counselors, general and special education teachers and professionals from other fields. This course is an elective for the master degree.

EDUG 738. Evaluating School Effectiveness. 3 Credits.

Models, current practices, strategies, and a variety of data sources for determining school, personnel and program effectiveness. Involving constituencies and staff in assessing school effectiveness and accountability for helping students meet state standards; examination of self-study and accrediting agency school evaluation processes; authentic, integrated assessment including portfolio assessment, understanding and using standardized test result to improve student learning. Course related leadership activities required.

EDUG 739. Administrative and Curricular Concerns of Private Schools. 3 Credits.

Analysis/discussion, lecture, collaborative learning, intensive study, field experience related to issues for developing or enhancing administrative and curricular leadership of the private school administrator, assistant principal, and department chair. Participants present evidence of knowledge, skills and dispositions for effective leadership in urban and suburban settings. Course projects that promote collaboration, communication, and planning with parents, students, staff, and community leaders may include action research, strategic planning, change processes, design for staff development, computer application and/or authoring professional papers. Program portfolio and publication or multimedia presentation required. Satisfies the requirement for Child Abuse Recognition and Reporting and S.A.V.E. legislation.

EDUG 740. School Law for Administrators. 3 Credits.

Legal issues concerned with the rights of students, parents, and professional personnel; negligence, equal opportunity, public and private schools court cases analyzed. Exploration of ethical behavior; application of statutes and regulations as required by law and implementation of school policies. Offered Spring 13.

EDUG 741. School Administration and Supervision. 3 Credits.

Theory and practice of educational leadership, administration and supervision; organizational patterns of the American elementary, middle and secondary schools; effective practices related to staff, instructional programs, pupil personnel services, discipline, evaluation of student learning, utilization of school plant, public relations; career guidance. Participants present evidence of knowledge, skills and dispositions for effective leadership in diverse educational settings. Intensive study of planning and design for staff development, school management, supervision of elementary, middle, secondary schools. Course projects related to safe, healthy supportive environments, budget and finance may include action research, strategic planning, change design, computer application and/or authoring professional papers. This course is an elective for the master degree.

EDUG 743. Personnel Practices. 3 Credits.

Theory and practice for administrators, department chairs, supervisory personnel regarding the recruitment, selection, assignment, and orientation of personnel; and the impact of collective negotiations.

EDUG 744. Contemporary Management Functions in the School. 3 Credits.

Management techniques providing administrative leadership in districts and schools in planning, programming, budgeting; utilizing facilities management and materials; scheduling; financial management; legal issues related to contract, negligence, state law, commissioner's regulations, safe environment. Course related leadership activities required. Offered Fall 12.

EDUG 745. Curriculum Development and Adaptation. 3 Credits.

Principles, trends, and techniques of curriculum planning for early childhood through secondary schools; adaptation of curriculum to differentiate instruction and meet special needs including those of English language; the role of the teacher, district and local supervisor and principal in meeting state curriculum standards and adapting curriculum for effective instructional delivery; study of curriculum issues related to instructional delivery and instructional leadership including technological enhancements. Emphasis on standards based teaching and learning that assists students to meet state standards, including those with special needs, and English language learners. Course related leadership activities required. Offered Spring 13.

EDUG 746. Administration and Supervision of Early Childhood Programs. 3 Credits.

Theory and practice of the administration and supervision of early childhood programs; review of legislation and requirements; discussion of developmentally appropriate practice; effective practices related to the selection and supervision of personnel; training and supervision of paraprofessional personnel; and policies, records, reports, instructional methods, materials and programs. Includes Child Abuse and Reporting.

EDUG 747. Supervision for the Improvement of Instruction. 3 Credits.

Role of district personnel, principal, supervisor, unit head, department chair in enhancing the learning process; review, analysis and critique of existing models of instruction and supervision; techniques for providing instructional leadership through laboratory process, simulation. Planning with college personnel to provide experiences for new teachers to enhance student learning. Course related leadership activities required. Offered Fall 13.

EDUG 748. Internship/Seminar I in School Building Leadership. 3 Credits.

This seminar integrates all previous learning experiences of the school leader, uses a problem solving approach to issues affecting administrators in elementary and secondary schools in urban or suburban areas. Prerequisites: 18 applicable credits taken at Manhattan College and appropriate G.P.A. in program including research if required; 100 hours of course related field experiences in leadership and permission of Program Director. Participants are advised to schedule time for this course so that site visits and 8 weeks of part-time equal to 200 hours of leadership practice can be completed within the semester of registration. Inability to do so may result in withdrawal from the course. Offered Fall 12, Spring 13, and Summer 13 by arrangement with the Program Director.

EDUG 749. Computer Applications for School Administrators. 3 Credits.

The application of basic computer functions to administrative tasks of planning, budgeting and communication; issues in computer managed and computer assisted instruction; computer hardware and software for district and school administration and management. This course is an elective for the master degree.

EDUG 750. Principles and Practices of Reading for the At Risk, English Language Learner [ELL] and Disabled.. 3 Credits.

Psychological principles of learning underlying reading instruction for diverse students (disabled English Language Learners [ELL] and gifted); methods of instruction and classroom organization for general, special education, and ELL students; materials, testing procedures, differentiated instructional strategies and computer applications in reading instruction. Three credits.

EDUG 753. Teaching Reading in the Content Areas for the At Risk English Language Learner [ELL] and Disabled (Grades K-8). 3 Credits.

Techniques for integrating reading and thinking skills into instruction in English, Social Studies, Science and Mathematics for grades K-8. Focus on the Common Core Learning standards in ELA and Mathematics, NYS Content and Performance Standards for Social Studies and Language Arts. Formal and informal assessment of word recognition, vocabulary development, comprehension, study skills. Emphasis on differentiated instructional practices for the At Risk, ELL and disabled student. Three credits.

EDUG 754. Literature for the At Risk and Disabled (Grades K-8). 3 Credits.

Examination of literature. Inter-relationship of dramatization, story telling, speaking, reading and writing explored for grades K-8. Study of authors and illustrators. Focus on Common Core Standards for Literacy differentiated instruction and strategies for integrating literature into curriculum areas such as Social Studies, Science and Math for the At Risk and disabled student.

EDUG 756. Organization, Administration and Supervision of Reading Programs. 3 Credits.

Organizational and supervisory practices for all levels of reading instruction and literacy. Examination of: procedures for conducting a reading/literacy needs assessment; supervision of reading/literacy teachers; organization and implementation of a staff development programs; development of funded programs; evaluation of reading/literacy instructional materials; training and supervision of paraprofessionals and other auxiliary personnel; computer applications in reading/literacy; consideration of requirements to help students meet common core state standards in ELA. This course is an elective for the master degree.

EDUG 757. Organization, Administration and Supervision of Math, Science, and Technology Programs. 3 Credits.

Theory and practice of administration and supervision of Mathematics and Science instruction in elementary and secondary schools emphasizing hands-on, multisensory, learning experiences that integrate technology for students; developmentally appropriate practice related to mathematics and science learning, especially in young children and those with special needs and English language learners; effective practices related to the selection, training, and supervision of personnel; integration of lifelong learning and use of current developments in Mathematics and Science related to careers, economy, and environment; state and national curriculum standards for elementary, middle, and secondary schools; consideration of requirements to help students meet common core state standards in math and science literacy. This course is an elective for the master degree.

EDUG 760. Mentoring. 3 Credits.

Theories, principles, concepts and practice related to direction and supervision of student teachers and administrative interns at the school and district level, new and experienced professionals for mentors and principals; principles of adult learning; collaboration and team planning for a productive educational environment; use of technology for monitoring and assessing student progress; application of diverse instructional strategies; interdisciplinary teaching; succession planning. Collaboration of district, elementary, middle/secondary school and college faculty for effective teaching and learning. Use of technology for meeting common core learning standards. This course is an elective for the master degree.

EDUG 761. Technology Utilization for Interactive Learning for the At Risk, English Language Learners [ELL] and Disabled. 3 Credits.

Examination of the use of instructional technology in the delivery of standards-based instruction in the general, special education, ELL classroom. Exploration of assistive technology. Emphasis on: internet usage in the development of thematic instructional units; interactive Smart board lesson plans, e-portfolios, presentation graphics, use of social media, PowerPoint and web page development. Opportunities for hands-on experience with instructional software in the computer lab. Three credits.

EDUG 766. Literacy Instruction for the At Risk, English Language Learner [ELL] and Disabled Student (Grades K-8). 3 Credits.

Study of the physiological, psychological, and emotional development of exceptional students in relation to listening, speaking, reading and writing achievement; Common Core Learning standards in ELA, techniques of diagnostic evaluation; differentiated instruction; modifications of curriculum and methods of teaching reading and communication skills to students – ELL, disabled, as well as gifted. Three credits.

EDUG 768. Integrated Curriculum: Math, Science and Technology I for the At Risk, English Language Learner [ELL] and Disabled Student (Grades K-8). 3 Credits.

Examination of Science, Math and Technology curriculum based upon the Common Core Learning Standards for Math and the NYS Content and Performance Standards for Science and frameworks for grades K-8. Focus on constructivism and inquiry based problem solving. Review of N.Y.S. assessments, alternative assessments and curriculum adaptations for the disabled. Overview of current research in the field. Focus on, methods, materials, questioning techniques and best practices based upon the inquiry approach. Opportunities for hands on experience with materials and software and use of cooperative learning strategies to explore concepts. Three credits.

EDUG 771. Biology Science: Elementary At Risk I. 3 Credits.

Diagnosis and remediation of reading, language and writing disabilities in a clinical setting for disabled students; training in alternative reading strategies and techniques; lesson planning and evaluation of progress with recommendations for instruction. Prerequisites: EDUG 750, EDUG 766 or permission of the Director of Special Education.

EDUG 773. Communication Skills for the Learning Disabled. 3 Credits.

Identification, diagnosis and etiology of specific learning disabilities; legislative trends; services; overview of methods employed in the remediation of communication problems; emphasis on differentiated instructional practices that can be used in the special education or inclusive setting.

EDUG 775. Mathematics Instruction for the At Risk, English Language Learner [ELL] and Disabled (Grades K-8).. 3 Credits.

Review of the Common Core Learning Standards for Math, curriculum grades K-8 and current research. Emphasis on problem solving skills and curriculum integration; methods, materials and instructional technology appropriate for the At Risk ELL and disabled student. Opportunity for hands-on experience, use of cooperative learning strategies and technology applications to explore concepts. Three credits.

EDUG 776. Science Instruction for the At Risk and Disabled. 3 Credits.

Overview of the nature and needs of the at risk and mildly disabled student; examination of the Science standards and core curriculum K-8; interpretation of the Elementary Science Program Evaluation Test (ESPET). Examination of inquiry and problem solving skills; curriculum integration; and methods, materials and technology appropriate for the at risk and disabled student. Opportunity for hands-on experience with materials.

EDUG 778. Nature and Needs of the Exceptional Individual. 3 Credits.

Overview of the historical social and legal foundations of Special Education. Survey of the nature and needs of the mentally retarded, emotionally disturbed, autistic, physically disabled, deaf, blind, learning disabled and gifted students; assistive technology. Introduction to agencies, programs, facilities and employment opportunities which support the disabled individual and family. Minimum of 25 hours of observation/field work in schools serving the disabled and their families. Satisfies the requirement for Autism. Three credits.

EDUG 779. Independent Study in Instructional Technology for the Teacher of the At Risk and Disabled (K-8). 3 Credits.

Designed to allow the student with background and experience with instructional technology to pursue an area of interest.An overview and outline of the proposed project is required prior to registration. Permission of the Director of Special Education.

EDUG 780. Psychopathology. 3 Credits.

Major syndromes of childhood, adolescence, and adulthood as seen within the context of normal development; consideration of various theoretical, diagnostic, etiological, and therapeutic viewpoints; practice with rating scales and inventories: Assessment integrating the DSM-IV.

EDUG 781. Management Techniques and Curriculum for the At Risk and Behaviorally Disordered. 3 Credits.

Study of models for the management of teaching and learning of the At Risk and the behaviorally disordered student; review of informal assessment techniques; emphasis on planning and management of teaching and learning; methods for developing positive social skills. Examination of support services in the school and community which strengthens family partnerships. Curriculum issues for students in inclusive or special education settings explored. Minimum of 25 hours of observation/fieldwork.

EDUG 782. Psychology and Education of the Mentally Retarded. 3 Credits.

Analysis of biological, psychological, and social factors associated with mental retardation; etiology, definition, and classification treated; problems in differential diagnosis explored; and emphasis on exemplary programs and curriculum, methods and materials for the mentally retarded. Three credits.

EDUG 783. Technological Applications for the At Risk and Disabled. 3 Credits.

Examination of the use of technology in the general, special education and inclusive classroom. Experiences will include: development of websites and e-portfolios, accessing educational database sites; the use of software across the curriculum; development and implementation of curriculum based projects using technology. Opportunities for hands-on experience with instructional software.

EDUG 785. Life Science for the At Risk, English Language Learner [ELL] and Disabled Student (Grades K-8).. 3 Credits.

Basic concepts of Life Science as aligned with the N.Y.S. Learning Standards and Curriculum K-8. Emphasis on inquiry and problem solving skills and differentiation of content. Examination of scientifically validated methods and materials for the at risk, ELL and disabled in the special education or inclusive setting. Provision for hands on activities and use of cooperative learning strategies. Three credits.

EDUG 787. Psycho-Educational Assessment for the At Risk and Disabled Student. 3 Credits.

Formal and informal techniques for assessing academic skills applicable to the at risk and disabled student; observational and interviewing procedures; inventories, rating scales, standardized tests; and instruments assessing language arts and math. Students must demonstrate competence in selection, administration, scoring and interpretation of psycho-educational tests, and conferencing with parents. Opportunity for hands on experience with data analysis. Course conducted in the Manhattan College Learning Center or field site. Minimum of 12 hours of supervised clinic/fieldwork.

EDUG 789. Methods of Teaching the At Risk and Disabled Student (Grades K-8). 3 Credits.

Examination of N.Y.S. Content and Performance Standards, curriculum, methods, and materials applicable to at risk and special education students grades K-8; emphasis on the modification of materials and strategies for instruction in general, special education and inclusive classrooms. Students must demonstrate competence in the writing and implementation of an individual educational plan, and conferencing skills with parents. Opportunities for hands-on experiences with materials and instructional software. Course conducted in Manhattan College Learning Center or field site. Minimum of 14 hours of supervised teaching.

EDUG 791. Independent Study in Special Education. 3 Credits.

Independent project in area of Special Education conducted under the guidance of faculty member. Student must submit outline of proposed study prior to registration. Permission of the Director of Special Education Program required.

EDUG 799. Administration and Supervision of Special Education Programs. 3 Credits.

Theory and practice of special education administration and supervision; review of legislation and regulations regarding Committee on Special Education, Individualized Education Program, inclusion and placement; effective practices related to supervision of teachers; and staff policies, records reports, pupil personnel, instructional programs. Satisfies the requirement for Child Abuse and S.A.V.E. legislation.

EDUG 800. Internship in Community Counseling. 3 Credits.

Participation in onsite counseling experiences under the supervision of agency personnel and faculty of Manhattan College. The nature of the experience will be determined by the area of specialization and agency placement.Prerequisite: Matriculation in P.D. Program, 21 credits and permission of Program Director.

EDUG 802. Foundations, Theory and Practice of Bilingual General and Special Education. 3 Credits.

This course examines the basic foundations, theories and practices related to bilingual education including the historical, political and legal foundations. Theories, literature and research related to multicultural practices as educators and/or counselors will be explored.

EDUG 805. Integrated Learning I: Social Studies and Language Arts Instruction for the At Risk/Disabled Student. 3 Credits.

American history, civics and geography, integrated with the development of literacy skills and exploration of literary genres. Incorporation of skills pertinent to Social Studies and Language Arts. Utilization of technology, Internet and software as instructional tools. Curriculum based upon the New York State Content and Performance Standards in the areas of Social Studies, Language Arts and National Geography Standards. Latest research on teaching the at risk and disabled student. Learning presented utilizing the constructivist approach for integrated instruction. Highlighted are best practices for differentiated instruction. Use of cooperative learning strategies to explore concepts. Emphasis on the importance of understanding and respecting cultural differences stressed.

EDUG 806. Inclusive Practices. 3 Credits.

Examination of: research and legislation; different models; effective practices of collaboration, team building, management, grouping, instruction; adaptation of materials and differentiated instruction to facilitate learning for the disabled student.

EDUG 807. Measurement and Assessment for Counselors. 3 Credits.

Theoretical, methodological, sociocultural, and ethical factors in the interpretation of psychological test data will be studied. An examination of basic measurement fundamentals such as types of tests and scores, reliability and validity, and essential statistical concepts will be followed by a focus on the assessment of intelligence, abilities, achievement, and personality. Specific emphasis will be on the interpretation and integration of test scores for individuals. Ethical considerations in appraisal will also be addressed.

EDUG 808. Integrated Learning II:Social Studies and Language Arts Instruction for the At Risk/Disabled Student. 3 Credits.

World history, civics, and geography, integrated with the development of literacy skills and exploration of literacy genres. Incorporation of skills pertinent to Social Studies and Language Arts. Utilization of instructional technology as an instructional tool for learning. Curriculum based upon the New York State Content and Performance Standards. Review of research on teaching the at risk and disabled student. Learning presented utilizing the constructivist approach for interdisciplinary instruction. Highlighted are best practices for differentiated instruction. Use of field trips to explore concepts. Emphasis on investigation of issues from different cultural perspectives.

EDUG 809. Organization, Administration and Supervision of Physical Education Programs. 3 Credits.

Theory and practice of administration and supervision of physical education instruction for general and special education students in elementary and secondary school; review of legislation and requirements; discussion of developmentally appropriate practice; effective practices related to the selection, training, and supervision of personnel; integration of lifelong learning and practice of healthful behavior including nutrition and exercise, and policies, record keeping, reporting, instructional strategies, materials, and programs. Satisfies the requirement for Child Abuse Recognition and Reporting.

EDUG 810. Bilingual and Multicultural Assessment of Linguistically and Culturally Diverse Students. 3 Credits.

This course will focus on the development of competencies in multidisciplinary assessment of linguistically and culturally diverse students with a specific emphasis on general and special education with limited English proficiency.(LEP) The course will also focus on the relationship between the linguistic and cultural influences of major racial and/or ethnic groups and their communication patterns. Format and informas assessment of behavioral functioning is included. 10 hour clinical requirement.

EDUG 811. Brain Compatible Learning for the At Risk, English Language Learner [ELL] and Disabled Student. 3 Credits.

Overview of brain development research and theory; impact on learning; and application to classroom instruction for the at risk, ELL and disabled student. Opportunity for hands-on experience with materials and methods of brain compatible instruction. Three credits.

EDUG 812. Integrated Curriculum: Math, Science and Technology II for the At Risk, English Language Learners [ELL] and Disabled (Grades K-8).. 3 Credits.

Examination of Science, Math and Technology curriculum based upon the Common Core Learning Standards for Math and the NYS Content and Performance Standards for Science and frameworks for grades K-8. Review of research on teaching and learning presented utilizing the constructivist approach. Utilization of instructional technology, as an integral component of the instructional process. Focus on best practices for differentiated instruction to meet the needs of the at risk and disabled student. Use of cooperative learning strategies and technology to enhance teaching and learning.. Opportunities for hand-on experience with materials and instructional technology. Three credits.

EDUG 813. Curriculum, Methods, and Materials in Core Subjects for English Language Learners [ELL] in General, and Special Education. 3 Credits.

Focus on instructional methods, materials and strategies for teaching standards based Social Studies, Language Arts, Math and Science for English Language Learners in General, Special Education, Bilingual and Teaching English as a Second Language (TESOL) settings. Emphasis on the use of subject matter content for improving second language acquisition. Exploration of instructional practices that meet the developmental and educational needs of the English Language Learner [ELL]. Attention to cross cultural learning style that impacts instruction with emphasis given to differentiating and adapting instruction to meet educational and linguistic characteristics of bilingual general and special education students. (10 hours of observation in a bilingual/TESOL general or special education setting.) Three Credits.

EDUG 814. Curriculum Assessment and Methods of Teaching Language Arts in the Bilingual General and Special Education Setting. 3 Credits.

Exploration of teaching methods, material, and assessment for teaching Language Arts using native language and English. Examination of strategies incorporating listening, speaking, reading, and writing in native language to facilitate the transition to English. Commercial and student made materials and assessment instruments explored. Attention to cross cultural learning style that impacts instruction with emphasis given to differentiating and adapting instruction to meet educational and linguistic characteristics of the Bilingual English language learner in general and/or special education (15 hours of field experience in an appropriate general education and/or special education bilingual setting) Three Credits.

EDUG 815. English Language Arts Curriculum, Assessment and Methods of Teaching English as a Second Language [TESOL] in General and Special Education. 3 Credits.

Examination of instructional practices to enhance the acquisition of English Language Proficiency focusing on listening, speaking, reading, and writing. to meet ESL and Common Core Learning Standards in ELA. Commercial and student made materials explored. Focus on informal and formal assessment instruments, such as NYSESLAT. Attention to cross cultural learning style that impacts instruction with emphasis given to differentiating and adapting instruction to meet educational and linguistic characteristics of bilingual, general and special education students. (15 hours of field experience in an appropriate general education, special education, TESOL or bilingual setting). Three Credits.

EDUG 816. Approaches to Counseling Linguistically and Culturally Diverse Student. 3 Credits.

This course will focus on the development of general techniques for counseling and the use of techniques specifically applicable to diverse populations and populations who are linguistically different. A case study approach will be used.

EDUG 817. Cross Cultural Counseling. 3 Credits.

This course will focus on issues in multicultural counseling in urban multiethnic educational and human services settings. Awareness of and sensitivity to social and cultural influences in counseling and in consultation services provided by counselors will be emphasized. Included will be exploration of characteristics of clients from diverse ethnic groups and their impact on counseling strategies. Course will include an experimental assessment component and consultation.

EDUG 818. Internship: Bilingual Counseling. 3 Credits.

Provides the student with an experience in gaining more knowledge of and experience in providing appropriate interventions to culturally and linguistically diverse clients.

EDUG 819. Internship in Mental Health Counseling I. 3 Credits.

Participation in on – site counseling experiences under the supervision of licensed or certified Mental Health Counselors, Social Workers, psychologists, or Medical Doctors in agencies, community centers, hospitals, and in certain instances, schools. Supervision and integrating seminar including clinical diagnosis with DSM-IV. Prerequisite: Matriculation in Mental Health Master’s, completion of EDUG 732, 30 credits and permission of MHC Program Advisor.

EDUG 820. Consultation in the Schools. 3 Credits.

Consultation skills for the general bilingual, Teaching English as a Second Language [TESOL] and special education teacher, support staff and school administrator. Analysis of various theories and models of school consultation. Review of current research strategies and supervised practice of observational, interactive communication, and collaborative problem solving skills for systems change. Laboratory and/or field experience required. Prerequisite: Permission of the Director of Special Education. Three credits.

EDUG 821. Internship in School Counseling I. 3 Credits.

Internship I provides onsite experience in the application of theory to practice and development of counseling and case conceptualization skills. The integrated seminar will focus on the role of the ASCA National model for school counselors. Issues related to human development, wellness, cultural competence, and social justice advocacy will also be addressed. The experience consists of 300 hours of experience on site including 120 direct hours with clients individually and in groups. A weekly integrated seminar with a faculty supervisor is required. Upon completion of the requirements, students proceed to Internship II, which also includes 300 hours. Prerequisite: 27 credits, EDUG 713, EDUG 851 through data collection; EDUG 725. Co-requisite: EDUG 732.

EDUG 822. Differentiated Instruction for the At Risk, English Language Learner [ELL] and Disabled (Grades K-8).. 3 Credits.

Review of the Common Core Learning Standards in ELA and Mathematics, NYS Content and Performance Standards in Science and Social Studies and sequence of curriculum for grades K-8. Techniques for adapting curriculum to meet the needs of the at risk, ELL and disabled student; strategies for bridging the gap between curriculum and methodology in special education and general education; and use of technology as a tool for learning and teaching. Strategies for grouping and individualization. Fundamentals of lesson planning stressing differentiated instructional practices. Provision for hands-on experience with materials and software. Three credits.

EDUG 823. Theory and Practice in Early Childhood Schools for the At Risk and Disabled Student. 3 Credits.

Emphasis on research and theory relevant to the physical, cognitive, social and emotional development of the early childhood student. Examination of developmentally appropriate practices in the Early Childhood School. Overview of organizational patterns that take into account the developmental needs of the At Risk and disabled Early Childhood student in today’s multicultural society. Different approaches to grouping and differentiating instruction. Strategies that facilitate parental involvement explored. Review of innovative practices and current issues in Early Childhood education. A minimum of 25 hours of clinical and/or field work required.

EDUG 824. Early Childhood Curriculum and Pedagogy for the At Risk, English Language Learner [ELL] and Disabled Student. 3 Credits.

Examination of standards based Early Childhood curriculum with emphasis on an integrated approach to instruction for the at risk, ELL and disabled student. Exploration of learning and teaching within a multicultural context. Emphasis on developmentally appropriate methods, instructional materials and technology to enhance learning. Study of techniques and differentiated instructional strategies to adapt curriculum to meet the needs of the at risk, ELL and disabled students in the general education, special education and inclusive setting. A minimum of 50 hours of fieldwork is required. Three credits.

EDUG 825. Seminar and Internship in Early Childhood General and Special Education. 3 Credits.

Observation and student teaching to gain proficiency in teaching early childhood at risk and disabled students in the general education, special education and/or inclusive classroom. Twenty (20) days of student teaching. Students must demonstrate teaching competence under the supervision of the teacher in the field and a faculty member. Seminar sessions include discussion of Common Core Standards, behavior management, teaching strategies, i.e. differentiated instruction, diversity and current issues in the field of Early Childhood. Prerequisite: Matriculation in the graduate education childhood/special education programs, minimum G.P.A. 3.0 and meet the physical, mental, speech, language, and other standards established for the profession and permission of Director of Graduate Childhood/Special Education Programs. Three Credits.

EDUG 826. Improvement of English Language Arts Practice for Teachers of At Risk, English Language Learner [ELL] and Disabled. 3 Credits.

Experiences provided to prepare teachers to become leaders in their schools. Utilization of the peer coaching/turnkey model to enable teachers to assume leadership roles in their learning communities to build capacity. Opportunities provided for teachers to practice facilitation skills. Exploration of Common Core Learning standards and alignment with grade level curriculum. Use of multiple data sources to monitor student achievement, plan and deliver differentiated tiered instruction to meet the needs of Special Education and English Language Learners (ELL) and at risk students. Examination of student work and opportunity to share ‘best practices’. Training in the use of the research based Danielson model to promote reflection on current pedagogy and determine strategies to improve teacher effectiveness. Three credits.

EDUG 827. Internship in School Counseling II. 3 Credits.

Students in the counseling program proceed through a well-thought out experiential component in the program over two semesters in a school. Internship in school counseling II builds upon Internship in school counseling I and is the last of the experiential components. Internship in school counseling II provides the student with an experience in learning to facilitate further professional development including self-reflection and leadership of a team. The focus is on an integration of all facets of the counseling role including a review of special areas of importance and in personal development. Practical application of counseling theories and techniques to diagnosis, ethics and law, and the work of counselors with special populations will be emphasized. The experiential component consists of direct service work with clients and consultation work in the school. The Internship includes 300 hours of structured field experiences, of which 120 is required to be direct counseling with clients individually or in groups. Prerequisite: EDUG 821 Co-requisite: EDUG 852.

EDUG 828. Process of Counseling the Individual in MHC. 3 Credits.

An experiential course where students learn skills of counseling intake assessment and counseling intervention and then practice those skills in videotaped counseling dyads in which they enact the roles of counselor and client. The emphasis is on counseling process over an extended period of time and across multiple sessions. Students will gain knowledge and skills in addressing issues related to beginning, maintaining, and terminating a therapeutic relationship, in conducting intake assessment, case conceptualization, and theory-based intervention, and in writing progress notes (using the DAP note format) and intake report. Students will also heighten self and interpersonal awareness and explore the ways that individual differences may manifest themselves in communication and connection. Prerequisite: EDUG 721, EDUG 722, EDUG 726. Co-requisite: EDUG 732.

EDUG 831. Principles of Instructional Design. 3 Credits.

This foundation course provides the participant with background about the key principles of instructional design; hands-on opportunities to design instruction that is effective, efficient, and engaging. Course content will focus on determining learner needs, defining the goals of the instruction, and creating a process that may take place in an increasingly technological environment. E-tools and e-learning will be integrated into learning strategies and curriculum. Participants will produce deliverables that can be used for online, distance, and/or blended learning. This course is for educators in the broadest sense: staff developers, trainers, K-12 professionals, training professionals who seek proficiency in designing technology enhanced learning experiences at all levels of skill, preparing participants to apply instructional systems design and theory to lead learning with technology. Field experience required.

EDUG 835. Proficiencies for Educational Leadership. 3 Credits.

Skills and strategies for creating the learning community that characterizes quality education in the district and school; group processes for shared decision-making and collaboration with staff and parents; communication skills for dealing with constituencies and stakeholders; case studies, simulations. Based on NYS Essentials for School Leaders and ISLLC Standards. Course related leadership experience required. Prerequisite: EDUG 735 or permission of Program Director.

EDUG 836. Issues in School Based Management, Supervision and Curriculum. 3 Credits.

Through case studies, simulations, role play, and web resources, participants will plan to deal with pertinent issues arising from questions, advantages and obstacles to effective management of districts and schools, including but not limited to, school choice, parent and teacher involvement, goal driven instruction and delivery of instructional services, use of technology; financial and strategic planning. This course is an elective for the master degree.

EDUG 837. Organizational Development. 3 Credits.

Exploration of change factors and their effect on human behavior and interrelationships; effect on the educational social system; leadership skills required for participatory decision-making; dealing with conflict and strategies for conflict resolution; power issues related to empowerment, authority, responsibility and accountability; and creating and developing the learning community. School improvement plans, district and school leadership teams, data-based strategic planning. Course related leadership activity required.

EDUG 838. Evaluating Leadership Effectiveness. 3 Credits.

Skills and strategies for determining needs, outcomes, and program effectiveness vis a vis student achievement, values promotion, ethics, accountability, staff participation; promoting parent and local board inclusion in philosophy and goal setting; and evaluating the quality of educational programs, supportive environments and school climate; exploration of the essential characteristics of educational leaders in assisting students to meet common core state standards. Course related leadership activity required.

EDUG 839. School Finance. 3 Credits.

Issues for district and school administrators, business managers, and other school personnel related to budget, finance and accounting. Course related leadership activity required.

EDUG 840. Quantitative Process Control in Education & Field Experience. 4 Credits.

Issues for district level administrators, business managers, and other school personnel related to budget, finance and accounting. This course includes 10 hours of course related field experience.

EDUG 841. Leadership, Administration and Supervision of the Middle School. 3 Credits.

Theory and practice of educational administration and supervision; organizational characteristics and components of the successful American middle school; effective practices related to advisement, staff collaboration, teaching teams, developmentally appropriate instructional programs for the middle school child, common core standards based teaching and learning, authentic assessment, guidance of the early adolescent, student engagement, parent involvement, safety and discipline issues, evaluation of student progress, career guidance. This course is an elective for the master degree.

EDUG 842. Leadership, Adminstration and Supervision of the Secondary School. 3 Credits.

Theory and practice of school administration and supervision; organizational characteristics and components of the successful secondary schools; consideration of cross cultural and international practices related to student achievement and involvement in learning; scheduling, advisement, collaboration, teaming, apprenticeships for the secondary school student; common core standards based teaching and learning, authentic assessment, guidance of the adolescent, safety and discipline issues, evaluation of student progress, college and career readiness; guidance/ internships/developmentally appropriate service projects. This course is an elective for the master degree.

EDUG 843. Total Quality Management for Educational Leaders. 4 Credits.

Course participants engage in reflective practice on ways to provide leadership for quality management int he school or district setting. With "real life" needs to attend to, potential and practicing school and district administrators will design strategies for data driven decision making based on TQM concepts, principles, and techniques for school and district wide improvements of student learning. Course related leadership activities required. This course includes 10 hours of course related field experience.

EDUG 844. District Level Management Functions. 3 Credits.

Analysis, discussion, intensive study of the evolution of educational reform movements leading to site based management for district and local administrative and supervisory personnel; theory, principles and practices for team building, shared decision-making and relationships at the local, district, and system levels. Participants present evidence of knowledge, skills and dispositions based on the ISLLC standards. Course integrates theory, concepts, principles and application of content to district and local leadership in urban and suburban settings; includes strategic planning, collaboration, and evaluation of outcomes for leadership teams, board relationships, mentoring, and program development. Course related leadership activity required.

EDUG 845. Computer and Technology Utilization for Instructional Delivery. 3 Credits.

Role of the supervisor, consultant, and/or administrator in improving teaching/learning by survey of computer programs for curriculum enhancement. Strategies for staff development/collaboration to assess effectiveness of such programs. Use of common core state standards for curriculum planning and instruction. Field experience will include exploration of existing programs utilizing computers to improve instruction. Opportunity for hands-on experiences (lab) to investigate software and hardware. Course related leadership activities required. Prerequisites: EDUG 749, EDUG 745 or permission of Program Director.

EDUG 846. Managing the Quality School. 3 Credits.

Applying concepts, principles, and techniques of Total Quality Management with emphasis on application to managing a school or district; using TQM to enhance management of the educational enterprise on the local or district level and administrative leadership. Course related leadership experience required.

EDUG 847. Total Quality Management for Educational Leaders. 3 Credits.

Course participants engage in reflective practice on ways to provide leadership for quality management in the school or district setting. With "real life" needs to attend to, potential and practicing school and district administrators will design strategies for data driven decision making based on TQM concepts, principles, and techniques for school and district wide improvements of student learning. Course related leadership activities required.

EDUG 848. Standards Based Performance Assessment. 3 Credits.

This advanced assessment course for school and district administrators, chairs, subject area coordinators at the district and local level, considers the effectiveness of school programs and teachers in meeting common core standards. Relates student outcomes to common core state standards, school programs, and performance assessment of teaching; aligns common core standards, curriculum, and assessment to design student learning experiences. Course related leadership activities required.

EDUG 849. Advanced Computer Applications for School Administrators. 3 Credits.

Computerizing school offices; the selection and evaluation of interactive computer software for professional development, supervision, and improvement of instruction; use of technology for data based decision making. Selection of software and hardware for networking, internal and external communication. Prerequisite: EDUG 749 or permission of Program Director.

EDUG 850. Advanced Practicum for Counselors in Group Procedures. 3 Credits.

Advanced counseling practice with groups under the supervision of the faculty; seminars, supervisory conferences and consultation; group experiences. Prerequisite: EDUG 725, 33 credits and permission of Program Director.

EDUG 851. Data Analysis and Report Writing in Educational & Psychological Research. 3 Credits.

The course provides students the opportunity to complete their required Master's major paper while continuing their learning about design, data analysis, and report writing in educational and psychological research. EDUG 851 builds on the research design skills introduced in EDUG713. A primary requirement of the course includes the development of SPSS data analysis skills including both descriptive and inferential statistics. Students are provided with a student version of SPSS, which they use through-out the completion of their major paper. In addition, students further their skills in reviewing the results presented in primary research in the fields of counseling and psychology. Upon completion of the major paper, students are encouraged to submit their work for presentation at a conference or for publication. Prerequisite: EDUG 713.

EDUG 852. Internship in Counseling I. 3 Credits.

Participation in on-site counseling experiences under supervision of pupil personnel services staff of host school, agency or hospital and faculty of Manhattan College.Prerequisite: Matriculation in P.D. program, 21 credits and permission of Program Director.

EDUG 853. Counseling the College Applicant. 3 Credits.

Examination of the necessary components in the college admissions selection process, i.e. high school preparation, standardized test scores, advanced placement credit, career preparation and counseling, financial aid, special programs, academic criteria, and personal statement. Review of the various guides and technological information available to the counselor and applicant, i.e Internet, Rezun, College Board, Peterson's College View and College Link.

EDUG 854. Supervised Fieldwork in Counseling. 3 Credits.

Opportunity for students to strengthen their knowledge and skills in the counseling setting. Students work under the supervision of a faculty member in an approved placement with individualized supervision regarding cases. Minimum of 90 hours in the field, project and supervision required. Matriculation in the Counseling program; EDUG 721, EDUG 722; and permission of Program Director.

EDUG 855. Supervised Fieldwork in Special Education. 3 Credits.

Opportunity for students to strengthen their knowledge & skills in the special education or inclusive setting. Students work under supervision of a faculty member in an approved placement. Minimum of 75 hours in the field and project required. Matriculation in the Special Education Program, and permission of the Director of Special Education.

EDUG 856. Supervised Fieldwork: General and Special Education. 3 Credits.

Opportunity for students to strengthen their knowledge & skills in the special education or inclusive setting. Students complete fieldwork in an approved placement. Minimum of 50 hours in the general education classroom and 25 hours in the special education/inclusive classroom required in grades 1 – 3 and 4-6 levels. Matriculation in the Special Education Program, and permission of the Director of Special Education. Three credits.

EDUG 857. Supervised Fieldwork in Alcohol and Substance Abuse Counseling. 3 Credits.

Opportunity for students to strengthen their knowledge and skills in an alcohol/substance abuse setting. Students must work under the supervision of a faculty member and appropriate on site staff in an approved setting. Minimum of 100 hours in the field and project required. Matriculation in the Alcohol/Substance Abuse program; EDUG 705, EDUG 721, EDUG 722 and permission of Program Director and Director of Graduate Education.

EDUG 858. Seminar, Observation, and Internship in Special Education (5 Year Program). 3 Credits.

Observation and practice teaching to meet specific requirements to gain proficiency in teaching disabled students in the Special Education and/or Inclusive classroom. (Full-time student teaching for one semester.) Students must demonstrate teaching competence under the supervision of the teacher in the field and a faculty member. Seminar sessions include the discussion of: field placement, diversity, behavior management, differentiated instructional strategies, autism, Child Abuse and SAVE and current issues in special education. Student teaching logs, reflective journals, and special education program e-portfolio required. Prerequisite: Matriculation in the five-year program, minimum G.P.A. 3.0 and meet the physical, mental, speech, language and other standards established for the profession. Permission of the Director of Special Education. Satisfies the requirement for Autism, S.A.V.E. and Child Abuse Recognition and Reporting. Three credits.

EDUG 859. Approaches to Multicultural Counseling:Theory and Practice. 3 Credits.

An examination of the theories and practices of multicultural counseling in urban multiethnic educational and human services settings. Awareness of and sensitivity to cultural factors in counseling and in consultation services provided by counselors will be emphasized. Course will include an experiential component and consultation.

EDUG 860. Teaching Literacy for Understanding to At Risk, English Language Learner [ELL] and Disabled (Grades K-8). 3 Credits.

Examination of the knowledge and skills to implement literacy instruction based on the Common Core Learning Standards in ELA for the at risk, ELL and disabled student for grades K-8. Opportunities provided to discuss and create literacy curriculum which address issues such as identifying what students need to understand; how to help develop the understandings; how to gauge student progress; and how to provide feedback to students. Three credits.

EDUG 862. Seminar/Practicum in Teaching: The Student with Disabilities 1-6. 3 Credits.

Analysis of current problems, diversity, legal issues, differentiated instructional strategies, Autism, child abuse, S.A.V.E and issues in Special Education. Students must demonstrate satisfactory teaching competency under supervision of appropriate personnel in the field. Minimum of 50 hours of teaching at the 1-6 grade levels in Special Education/inclusive classroom. Logs, reflective journals, project and special education program e-portfolio required. Prerequisite: Matriculation in the Special Education program, minimum G.P.A. 3.0 . Permission of the Director of Special Education. Satisfies the requirement for Autism, S.A.V.E. and Child Abuse Recognition and Reporting. Three credits.

EDUG 863. Seminar/Internship in Teaching: General and Special Education 1-6. 3 Credits.

Observation and practice teaching to meet the specific requirements to gain proficiency in teaching general and special education. A minimum of 20 days of student teaching in grades 1-3 or 4-6 in the special education or inclusive classroom is required. A minimum of 20 additional days of student teaching, at a different level (1-3 or 4-6), in the general education classroom is required, for a total of 40 days. Students must demonstrate teaching competence under the supervision of the teacher in the field and a faculty member. Seminar sessions include the discussion of: field placement, diversity, behavior management, differentiated instructional strategies, autism, Child Abuse and SAVE and current issues in special education. Internship reflective journals, logs and special education program e-portfolio required. Prerequisite: Matriculation in the Dual program, minimum G.P.A. 3.0 and meet the physical, mental, speech, language and other standards for the profession. Permission of the Director of Special Education. Satisfies the requirement for Autism, S.A.V.E. and Child Abuse Recognition and Reporting. Three credits.

EDUG 864. Counseling the College Student. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to focus on the theory, research and practice related issues relevant to the psychological; development of college students. Focus on intellectual, psychosocial, moral and vocational development with attention to the needs of special populations. Students will examine a service model including collaboration within and outside the institution and including examination of the legal and ethical issues related to counseling the college student.

EDUG 866. Practicum in Leadership, Supervision and Consultation in Counseling. 3 Credits.

Leadership, supervision and consultation provides the student with an experience in learning to facilitate the further professional development of a counselor-in-training. Although one goal is to prepare the experienced counselor in skills to supervise, the primary focus is on the ability to establish and develop counselor-supervisor relationships, case conceptualization and consultation, and understanding of leadership and organizational roles in relation to counseling sites.

EDUG 867. Professional Orientation to Counseling:Standards, Law, Ethics, and Evaluation. 3 Credits.

This course is designed for the beginning practitioner to provide exposure to issues related to professional functioning. Emphasis will be on ethical and legal issues as they relate to the profession of counseling and to each other. In addition the legal and ethical factors related to program development and evaluation will be considered.

EDUG 868. Integrated Curriculum; Math/Science/Technology. 3 Credits.

For District and School Administrators, department chairs, grade level and subject area coordinators, curriculum, and staff developers, this content based course incorporates content and performance standards from Math, Science and Technology, as well as literacy standards for differentiating instruction for a diverse student population including English language learners; data based evaluation strategies, and system wide decision making based on the NYS common core and ISLLC standards.

EDUG 869. Integrated Curriculum; Social Studies/Language Arts. 3 Credits.

For District and School Administrators, department chairs, grade level and subject area coordinators, curriculum, and staff developers, this content based course incorporates content and performance standards from English, the Language Arts common core, Social Studies and Physical Education/Home Ec/Careers, as well as literacy standards for differentiating instruction for a diverse student population including English language learners; data based evaluation strategies, and system wide decision making based on the NYS and ISLLC standards.

EDUG 870. Quantitative Process Control in Education. 3 Credits.

This course for district and school leaders and educators identifies key data analysis processes, roles of components and variations present in them. Using Pareto charts, histograms, control charts and other data mining tools, participants measure and use key data to develop a methodology to improve the administrative and educational process in the school and district. Incorporates principles and practices of data based decision-making. Course related leadership activities required.

EDUG 871. Quantitative Process Control in Education & Field Experience. 4 Credits.

The course for district level school leaders and educators identifies key data analysis processes, roles of components and variations present in them. Using Pareto charts, histograms, control charts and other mining tools, participants measure and count key data to develop a Plan. Do, Study, Act methodology to improve the administrative and educational processes in the schools of the district and the district itself. 10 hours of course related field experience are required.

EDUG 872. Probability and Statistics Using Technology. 3 Credits.

This is a content course in Probability and Statistics for teachers. Topics include descriptive statistics, rules of probability, sampling distributions, statistical inferences, regression and correlation. Technological tools used include calculators, spreadsheet package Excel, the computer algebra Maple, and the classroom management system Blackboard.

EDUG 873. Theory and Practice in Middle Schools for the At Risk and Disabled Student. 3 Credits.

Emphasis on research and theory relevant to the physical, cognitive, social and emotional development of the Middle School adolescent. Examination of developmentally appropriate practices in the Middle School. Overview of organizational patterns that take into account the developmental needs of the At Risk and disabled Middle School student in today's multicultural society. Different approaches to scheduling, advisement and grouping analyzed. Strategies that facilitate parental involvement explored. Review of innovative practices and current issues in Middle School education.

EDUG 874. Curriculum and Pedagogy in the Middle Schools for At Risk and Disabled Student. 3 Credits.

Examination of standards based Middle School curriculum with emphasis on an integrated approach to instruction for the At Risk and disabled student. Exploration of learning and teaching within a multicultural context. Emphasis on developmentally appropriate methods, and instructional materials to enhance learning. Study of techniques and differentiated instructional strategies to adapt curriculum to meet the at risk needs of the At Risk and disabled students in the special education, inclusive and general education classrooms. A minimum of 30 hours of clinical and/or field work required.

EDUG 875. Foundations in Learning and Teaching with Technology. 3 Credits.

The foundation course provides participants with background for integrating technology into education (societal issues, learning theories, planning and implementation); principles and strategies for using software, media tutors and tools (instructional and productivity software, multimedia and hypermedia); and integrating technology into specific teaching/learning discipline (language arts, science, math, social studies, art, music, physical ed, health, special education etc.) Designed for educational administrators, staff developers, counselors, general and special education teachers and professionals from other fields. Participants will learn to infuse the appropriate technologies into their own learning environment. Field experience required.

EDUG 876. Integrating Technology in Adult Learning and Colloboration. 3 Credits.

Participants in this course will gain knowledge and understanding of adult learning theory and the ability to collaborate with professional staff to support instruction and enhance student learning using educational technology. Designed for educational administrators, staff developers, counselors, general and special education teachers and professionals form other fields. Participants will engage in web design and videography. Field Experience.

EDUG 877. Instructional Design, Technology and Information Processing. 3 Credits.

Focus on instructional design and the role of cognitive processing theory in the development of technologies for learning environments. Emphasis on curriculum and how participants best learn from multimedia technologies. Knowledge and understanding of adult learning theory provides the foundation for the development and implementation of collaborative strategies appropriate for adult learners. Designed for educational administrators, staff developers, counselors, general and special education teachers and professionals from other fields to enable them to integrate technology into professional practice in order to provide optimal learning content. Field Experience.

EDUG 878. Advanced Group Counseling:Practice. 3 Credits.

An experiential course that focuses on application of group process to different counseling situations. Team projects will include facilitating and cofacilitating techniques, appropriate interventions and peer feedback. Participants will run outside groups and receive feedback and analysis. Group leadership styles will also be reviewed.

EDUG 879. Integrative Project and Seminar in Teaching and Learning with Technology. 3 Credits.

This capstone course in Teaching and Learning with Technology synthesizes the theoretical and technology components of the program. Participants will present a project that includes a research component conducted at a field site and demonstrate their understanding of teaching and learning with technology. Online and real time seminar sessions will provide support for effective needs assessment and strategic planning for the improvement of teaching and learning. This guided project will be a culmination of sixty hours os fieldwork done in the certificate courses. Designed for educational administrators, staff developers, counselors, general and special education teachers and professionals from other fields. Field Experience.

EDUG 880. Nature and Needs of Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder. 3 Credits.

Focus on etiology, major trends and issues concerning Autism Spectrum Disorder. Emphasis on: collaboration, inclusion, service delivery models, roles of special and general education teachers, individualized educational programs, family involvement, and community resources. Satisfies the requirement for Autism.

EDUG 881. Psychoeducational Assessment of Autism Spectrum Disorder. 3 Credits.

Focus on the educational assessment of students with Autism Spectrum Disorder. Analysis of formal and informal assessment instruments. Emphasis on gathering and analyzing information in order to plan meaningful instruction, evaluate interventions, select appropriate learning curricula and materials, and make appropriate educational decisions for individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder. Satisfies the requirement for Autism.

EDUG 882. Behavior Management and Counseling of Families of Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder. 3 Credits.

Focus on models for the behavior management of students with Autism Spectrum Disorders. Emphasis on management techniques, classroom and family organization, conferencing issues based on student needs and development. Satisfies requirement for Autism.

EDUG 883. Curriculum, Methods, Social Skill Development and Instructional Design for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder (Grades K-8). 3 Credits.

Curriculum, methods and materials for social integration and teaching children with Autism Spectrum Disorder in self-contained and inclusive settings with attention paid to NYS Content and Performance Standards (K-8). Design of individualized educational plans and creation of lesson plans. Demonstration of teaching skills emphasized in order to accommodate instruction and materials to the Autism Spectrum Disorder student. Satisfies requirement for Autism.

EDUG 884. Integrative Project in Autism. 3 Credits.

Project in area of Autism Spectrum Disorder conducted under the guidance of Faculty member. Student must submit an outline of proposed study prior to registration. Permission of the Director of Special Education required. Satisfies requirement for Autism.

EDUG 885. Internship: Teaching Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder. 3 Credits.

The internship experience and seminar provide the opportunity to apply knowledge, skills and strategies related to teaching children with Autism Spectrum Disorder in the classroom setting. Each internship is guided by a certified teacher and college supervisor. Students will develop teaching competencies while experiencing the personal and professional roles of a teacher of students with Autism Spectrum Disorder. The seminar is an opportunity for students and faculty to discuss current issues and ideas related to Autism Spectrum Disorder and to examine the relationship between these ideas and the classroom experiences. Internship portfolio, logs and journals required. Satisfies requirement for Autism.

EDUG 887. Mentored Research. 1 Credit.

Designed to provide mentoring for the collection of data, analysis of findings, discussion,conclusions and recommendations of the research paper. Students must have completed sections I,II and III of their major paper. Does not apply to degree. Pre-requisite: EDUG 713 or a previous major paper that meets program research requirements. Permission of Director. One credit. Pass/Fail.

EDUG 888. Independent Study in Research. 1 Credit.

Designed to provide mentoring for the collection of data, analysis of findings, discussion, conclusions and recommendations of the research paper. Students must have completed sections I, II and III of their major paper. Special Education and School Leadership participants register for the section designated for their program. Does not apply to the degree. Prerequisite: EDUG 713. Permission of the Program Director.

EDUG 889. Internship/Seminar II in School Building Leadership. 3 Credits.

Designed for ongoing supervision of the capstone leadership experience for completion of the internship project, portfolio, and exhibit of competencies. Participants complete 400 hours of leadership internship in 15 weeks full time or 30 weeks part time. Prerequisite: EDUG 600, 100 hours of CRLA, 18 credits of the required strands, permission of the Program Director.

EDUG 891. Foundations in Evaluation, Assessment, and Diagnosis. 3 Credits.

This foundation course is aimed at providing a theoretical and practical basis for individual assessment of personality, intelligence and aptitude, such as WISC-IV, WAIS-III, WIAT-II and TAT. Concepts of intelligence, applications to the educational settings, social and ethical issues of individual testing will be considered. Initial practice in administering major instruments of psychological assessment will allow students to develop an understanding of their diagnostic and therapeutic value. Theory of projective psychology and its application to personality assessment is combined with supervised practice in administering and interpreting projective tests. Special attention to figure drawings and TAT, but projective component of Bender-Gestalt Visual Perceptual Test is also included. The course provides initial experience in evaluation, assessment, diagnosis and treatment planning. Students will practive by administering the instruments to each other. Focus will be on integrating test material into comprehensive reports having meaning for the referral source and the client. Prerequisite: 18 credits in P.D. program.

EDUG 893. Internship/Seminar III in School District Leadership. 3 Credits.

Completion of the district level internship project, portfolio, and exhibit of competencies completed in 15 weeks full time or 30 weeks part time. Prerequisite: logged course related leadership activities, 42 credits beyond the baccalaureate degree, sbl certification or eligibility for same, permission of the Program Director.,A prerequisite for the Leadership Experience in Advanced Leadership Studies (internship) is acceptance by a school district for an administrative internship experience and sponsorship by a certified district level administrator on-site. The internship consists of sustained administrative experience in diverse settings planned collaboratively with university and district personnel in substantive, appropriate, and approved administrative and supervisory tasks. Requirements include, but need not be limited to, an electronic internship portfolio, an internship project, video tape, bi-weekly logs and journals, and others as required. Ordinarily, the Leadership Experience is a 15 week full-time program or a 30 week part-time program.

EDUG 893. Internship/Seminar III in School District Leadership. 3 Credits.

Completion of the district level internship project, portfolio, and exhibit of competencies completed in 15 weeks full time or 30 weeks part time. Prerequisite: logged course related leadership activities, 42 credits beyond the baccalaureate degree, sbl certification or eligibility for same, permission of the Program Director.,A prerequisite for the Leadership Experience in Advanced Leadership Studies (internship) is acceptance by a school district for an administrative internship experience and sponsorship by a certified district level administrator on-site. The internship consists of sustained administrative experience in diverse settings planned collaboratively with university and district personnel in substantive, appropriate, and approved administrative and supervisory tasks. Requirements include, but need not be limited to, an electronic internship portfolio, an internship project, video tape, bi-weekly logs and journals, and others as required. Ordinarily, the Leadership Experience is a 15 week full-time program or a 30 week part-time program.

EDUG 894. Internship Mental Health Counseling II. 3 Credits.

Continued participation in on-site counseling, experiences under the supervision of certified or licensed personnel of host school, agency or hospital. Particular emphasis on case assessment, analysis, diagnosis with DSM-IV, recommendations for services, and the delivery of planned interventions. Prerequisite: Matriculation in the MHC Program, successful completion of EDUG 819, and permission of MHC Program Advisor.

EDUG 896. Concepts of Wellness. 3 Credits.

A study of the diversified nature of health as it relates to everyday living by examining vital health areas and issues relevant to the concerns of students. An introduction to identification and reporting of suspected child abuse and maltreatment; instruction in preventing child abduction and abuse of alcohol, tobacco and other drugs; and providing safety education including instruction in fire and arson prevention. (Dual M.S.Ed. ).

EDUG 897. Principles and Practices of Education. 3 Credits.

Crucial issues in education: curricula objectives and designs, drug and child abuse, types of schools, special education programs, moral and spiritual values, community resources, educational law and school finances. 15 hours field visitation required. (Dual M.S. Ed.).

EDUG 898. Techniques for Language and Literacy Development for General, English Language Learner [ELL] and the Disabled.. 3 Credits.

Introduction to first and second language acquisition and development with emphasis on application to teaching and learning. Examination of psycho-linguistic principles for teaching monolingual and linguistically and culturally diverse learners. Instructional approaches and practices for developing listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in the general, English as a Second Language [ESL] and special education setting. Exploration of different models of instruction for students who are in Teaching English as a Second Language [TESOL] and/or bilingual settings. 10 hours of field required. (Dual M.S. Ed) Three credits.

EDUG 899. Physical Science for the Teacher of the At Risk, English Language Learner[ELL] and Disabled (Grades K-8).. 3 Credits.

Introduction to basic principles and concepts of physical science as aligned with the N.Y.S. Learning Standards for grades K-8. Emphasis is on constructivist inquiry based problem solving, questioning skills, methods and materials appropriate for the at risk ELL and disabled student. Appropriate hands-on activities to illustrate fundamental concepts. Three credits.

Back To Top