Catalog
2014-15

Visual and Performing Arts

Dr. Mark A. Pottinger
Chair of the Department

The Department of Visual and Performing Arts offers a major in Art History and minors in Art History, Digital Media Art, Music, and Theater.

The major in Art History examines art created from the ancient to the contemporary worlds within broad historical and cultural contexts. By developing a visual vocabulary, multiple perspectives on key monuments, and an understanding of the cross-disciplinary nature of art history, students learn to analyze visual materials, organize ideas, and write and speak persuasively about representational issues. The Manhattan College program takes advantage of the world-class architecture, galleries, libraries, and museums in New York City. By emphasizing historical research, written analysis, and observational interpretation, the Art History major helps prepare students for careers in museum and gallery curatorship, marketing and new media, and teaching, as well as professions that require visual analysis such as creative art, international relations, law, and medicine.

The four minors in Visual and Performing Arts are designed to supplement majors in numerous disciplines. In addition to examining broad historical and cultural contexts, courses provide opportunities for individual creativity and performance as well as an introduction to the theory and technology shaping contemporary fine arts disciplines. A minor in Art History, Digital Media Art, Music, or Theater is an ideal choice for a variety of careers. In addition to preparing students for advanced training in art, music, theater, or the graphic arts, the minor supports careers of historians, sociologists, psychologists, teachers, philosophers, copyright lawyers, non-for-profit business managers, writers, critics, journalists, museum curators, librarians, graphic designers, music producers, graphic illustrators, photographers, film producers, and advertising executives.

Majors and minors in Visual and Performing Arts may take advantage of internship programs placing students with record labels, local radio stations, New York City museums, private art galleries, music and graphic art magazines, production companies, and graphic design firms.

Major in Art History

Majors in Art History must take a minimum of 30 credits in Art History courses taken from the following six areas:

One of the following World Arts courses:3
Introduction to World Art
History of Asian Art
Special Topic in Art (on a world art topic)
Two of the following Art before 1600 courses:6
Ancient Art
Medieval Art
Renaissance Art
Special Topic in Art (on a pre-1600 topic)
Two of the following Art after 1600 courses:6
Nineteenth-Century Art: 1750 to1890
Baroque Art: From Empire to Revolution
History of Modern Art
Special Topic in Art (on a post-1600 topic)
One of the following Studio Art courses:3
Art of Digital Photography
Digital Drawing
Introduction to Graphic Design
To be taken during the Junior or Senior year:3
Senior Seminar in Art History
Art History electives:*9
Total Credits30

* Students interested in Museum Studies should take at least two of the following courses: ART 370 Current Trends, ART 402 Special Topic in Art, on a Museum Studies Topic,  ART 412 Independent Study, or ART 375 Internship.

Minor in Art History

Minors in Art History must take 15 credits of Art History courses as follows:

ART 151Roots: Art (First Year Seminar)3
Electives. At least 9 credits must be at the 300 or 400 levels *12
Total Credits15

*ART 375 Internship may substitute for an upper-level course.

Minor in Digital Media Art

Minors in Digital Media Art must take 15 credits of Digital Media courses including the following:

ART 212Art of Digital Photography *3
ART 213Digital Drawing *3
ART 214Introduction to Graphic Design *3
ART 380Digital Video Art: Editing and Production *3
ART 390Digital Audio Recording and Editing *3
Total Credits15

*ART 412 Independent Study or ART 375 Internship  may be substituted when the independent study or internship focus on a subject within Digital Media Art.

Minor in Music

Minors in Music must take 15 credits of Music courses including the following:

MUSC 151Roots: Music (First Year Seminar)3
MUSC 208Piano Skills and Techniques *3
or MUSC 209 Guitar Skills and Techniques
MUSC 220Fundamentals of Music Theory3
6 credits at the 300 or 400 levels6
Total Credits15
*

Three semesters of MUSC 129 Beginning Vocal Instruction, MUSC 130 Advanced Vocal Instruction, MUSC 131 Manhattan College Singers, MUSC 132 Manhattan College Orchestra or MUSC 133 Manhattan College Jazz Band may serve as a substitute.  MUSC 375 Internship may substitute for an upper-level course.

Minor in Theater

Minors in Theater must take 15 credits of Theater courses including the following:

THEA 190Acting Skills and Techniques3
THEA 260Introduction to Theater (One of the following:)3
One of the following:3
Introduction to Drama
The Theater and the City
History of the Broadway Musical
Electives (3 credits at 300-level or above)*6
Total Credits15

* Theater electives may be selected from the courses listed above as well as the following: THEA 134 The Manhattan College Players (3 credits maximum; THEA 250 Modern Dance: Thought and Motion; THEA 350 Contemporary Dance Composition; THEA 375 Internship; THEA 400 Special Topic in Theater; THEA 405 Independent Study; ENGL 361 Masterpieces of British Drama; or ENGL 381 Masterpieces of American Drama

A minimum grade of C is required for courses to satisfy all major and minor requirements. Minors must have a contract signed and approved by the Department Chair.

Art Courses

ART 150. Roots: Art. 3 Credits.

An intensive and critical examination of major works of art from the medieval period to the present that contribute to an understanding of the modern world.

ART 151. Roots: Art (First Year Seminar). 3 Credits.

An intensive and critical examination of major works of art from the medieval period to the present that contribute to an understanding of the modern world.

ART 212. Art of Digital Photography. 3 Credits.

Focuses on the creation of conceptually oriented digital prints, the history and aesthetics of digital art, and a thorough understanding of Photoshop, color management, digital cameras and ink jet printing. Includes extensive instruction in software and professional-grade printers that facilitate the creation of digital prints. Regular discussions and critiques of student work will scrutinize the student's objectives, intentions, conceptual ideas, and technical skills. Materials fee: $50.

ART 213. Digital Drawing. 3 Credits.

Introduces students to variety of skills and experiences ranging from still-life, portraiture, perspective and shading to the dynamic use of the human figure, as in drawing choreography. Taught within a Macintosh-computer environment using Adobe Illustrator and Corel Painter. Each student has use of a Wacom Intous digital sketch pad and stylus pen.

ART 214. Introduction to Graphic Design. 3 Credits.

Introduces the process of making graphic designs from the initial choice of a topic through the working stages and the finished presentation. Presents instruction in Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Illustrator programs. Some minor visual arts knowledge is highly recommended.

ART 218. Introduction to World Art. 3 Credits.

A survey and analytical study of selected major architectural monuments and masterpieces of painting, sculpture, and photography from Africa, Asia, Middle East, and South America. Art and architecture are placed within cultural, stylistic, and historical contexts.

ART 260. Monasticism and the Arts. 3 Credits.

A survey of the artistic achievements of monastic communities during the Catholic Middle Ages, from the Benedictines to the Franciscan and Dominicans. Students will read monastic texts and study major works of medieval architecture, manuscript illumination, painting, and sculpture that manifest monastic values.

ART 304. The Art and Architecture of Renaissance Italy: Florence and the Surrounding Environs. 3 Credits.

An on-site study of different aspects of the political, socio-economic, and cultural life of Italy as witnessed through the Renaissance art and architecture of Florence and the surrounding region. The course is offered in Italy during the summer.

ART 315. American Art. 3 Credits.

Examines American painting, sculpture, architecture, graphic art, and decorative arts from the colonial period to 1970. Emphasizes parallels with European culture, the characteristics of American realism, and social and political contexts. Topics include the emergence of American art, 1760-1840; American Romanticism of the Hudson River School and Luminism; the insurgent Realists of The Ashcan School; pioneers of American Modernism; and the Abstract Expressionists.

ART 316. History of Asian Art. 3 Credits.

Surveys the major movements of the arts of India, China and Japan, including painting, calligraphy, sculpture, architecture, photography and the decorative arts. Beginning with the Neolithic period and extending beyond modern movements to the contemporary era, the course examines works of Indian, Chinese and Japanese art in their aesthetic, social, philosophical and religious contexts. Discusses concepts essential to an understanding of Asian art, including Buddhism, Zen Buddhism, Confucianism and Daoism.

ART 320. Ancient Art. 3 Credits.

History of art in the Western tradition from the Paleolithic Age (20,000 B.C.) to the 4th century A.D. Examines the development of civilization in the Near East, Egypt, the early Aegean cultures, the emergence of Greek art, from the Bronze age through the Hellenistic period; and explores the rise and expansion of the Roman Empire; and the period from the beginning of the Christian era to the rule of Emperor Constantine in the 4th-century A.D. A museum assignment requires a visit to the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art or the Brooklyn Museum.

ART 321. Medieval Art. 3 Credits.

The history of art in the Middle Ages, beginning with Early Christian art and continuing through Late Gothic. A museum assignment requires a visit to the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art or the Brooklyn Museum.

ART 322. Renaissance Art. 3 Credits.

This class begins with the early Renaissance in Florence, continues with the High Renaissance in Italy, and concludes with the Renaissance in the North. The basic concepts that distinguish the Renaissance from the Medieval period and modern times are discussed. Individual work is placed within the context of contemporary history, emphasizing in humanism, the emerging individualism of the artist, the revival of interest in the ancient world, and the varied responses to the classical heritage. A museum assignment requires a visit to the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art or the Brooklyn Museum.

ART 323. Nineteenth-Century Art: 1750 to1890. 3 Credits.

Surveys nineteenth-century art from its roots in the Enlightenment and French Revolution to Post-Impressionism. Examines the innovations of artists and movements that led to the clash of classicism and romanticism, birth of landscape painting, and emergence of the avant-garde and radical painting that became the foundation of modern art. Focuses on how artists developed new visions in response to the century's political, social, and technological upheavals. Emphasizes major movements such as Neoclassicism, Romanticism, Realism, Impressionism, and Post-Impressionism. Includes museum visits.

ART 326. Baroque Art: From Empire to Revolution. 3 Credits.

This class discusses the profound geopolitical, religious, and economic changes and expansions in 17th century Europe as expressed in art and architecture, from the age of empire building and mercantilism to the age of revolution and enlightenment philosophy. The class will include trips to Metropolitan Museum of Art and special exhibitions at area museums.

ART 329. History of Modern Art. 3 Credits.

This course is an introduction to Modern art from the end of the 19th century to the present. Shaped by the dramatic social, technological and intellectual changes of the industrial age of modern life, painting, sculpture and new forms of art (e.g. photography) radically departed from the traditional notions of art formulated and practiced in pre-industrial society. Throughout the semester, we will examine the many artistic movements in modernisms wake, including impressionism, post-impressionism, expressionism, cubism, surrealism, and others as well as the rise of the avant-garde and the development of abstraction. This course includes visits to the Museum of Modern Art and various Chelsea area galleries.

ART 340. History of Fashion. 3 Credits.

Surveys costume and dress in Western culture ranging from antiquity to the present. Studies the costumes of various periods and the factors influencing the evolution of clothing styles. Examines historical influences, political rhetoric, economic issues and social and cultural identity in fashion in order to analyze contemporary trends and styles.

ART 358. The New York Skyscraper. 3 Credits.

An introduction to the art of building, concentrating on the skyscraper in New York City, and dealing only with such earlier work as relates to its background and development. Attention is given to planning, style, and engineering. The course features lectures, tours, visits to studios.

ART 360. New York City Architecture, Urbanism and Design. 3 Credits.

From the Federal-style row house to the modern skyscraper, New York's architectural heritage is compelling. This course is an introduction to the philosophy and socio-economic/political forces that have shaped our city. Using the city as a classroom, students experience architecture and the urban environment-look, touch, discuss, question. Classes take place on site, at various Manhattan locations.

ART 370. Current Trends. 3 Credits.

A course to introduce the student to the current New York Art Scene. There will be visits to galleries, studios, museums and performance spaces.

ART 375. Internship. 3 Credits.

Students participate in an off-campus training experience closely related to their area of study. Frequent meetings with the internship advisor and a paper are required. Internships are arranged through the Center for Career Development and must be approved in advance by the chair and the Dean of the School of Arts.

ART 380. Digital Video Art: Editing and Production. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on creating works of video art while examining and reflecting upon filmic history. There is extensive instruction in Final Cut Studio Pro and DVD Studio Pro, giving students the skills to begin making video in the first two weeks. Students create conceptual, engaging work that is critiqued at length. While examining video art's historical roots and contemporary video artists, students develop their video projects that build upon ideas and techniques realized from the first video assignment.

ART 390. Digital Audio Recording and Editing. 3 Credits.

An introduction to music and digital technology designed to help students gain familiarity with the language of music editing, recording, and production. Although the Apple-based program Logic will be the main software used for recording musical and other sonic schemes, ProTools, Finale, and GarageBand will also be used. Students will have access to Apple MacIntels, MIDI Controllers, Condenser Microphones, Monitor Speakers, Digital Pianos, and DigiDesign Mbox2 Sound Modules. Some minor musical knowledge is highly recommended.

ART 402. Special Topic in Art. 3-6 Credit.

An intensive study of a single artist, genre, period, culture, or issue facing visual art scholarship today. The subject studied will vary from semester to semester. A student may elect this course as often as four times for the art history minor, presuming a different subject each time. Offered every semester. Previous special topic courses include History of Photography", "Art Between the World Wars", "History of Modern Art", "History of Fashion", and "Video Editing and Production.".

ART 405. Senior Seminar in Art History. 3 Credits.

An overview of the theories and methods of art history that clarifies approaches to analyzing and interpreting art, including formalism, iconography, semiotics, Marxism, feminism, deconstructionism, and post-colonialism. Readings will cover art historical periods from the ancient to the contemporary and a wide range of media. Students will develop critical skills necessary to practice the discipline of art history: careful looking, original research, compelling argumentation, and clear writing.

ART 412. Independent Study. 3 Credits.

Individual study of a major artist, architect, or aesthetic issue facing art history scholarship today with a member of the department. Open only to students who secure the approval of the Chair of the Department and the consent of the individual instructor. A student may elect this course only once for credit towards the Minor in Art History.

Music Courses

MUSC 129. Beginning Vocal Instruction. 1 Credit.

The elements of vocal production, breathing, control and proper placement of the human voice. May be repeated or combined with ART 130 for a maximum of three credits.

MUSC 130. Advanced Vocal Instruction. 1 Credit.

Continuation of MUSC 129. Study of more advanced vocal literature. May be repeated or combined with MUSC 129 for a maximum of three credits. Prerequisite: ART 129 or permission of instructor.

MUSC 131. Manhattan College Singers. 1 Credit.

The study and performance of works for mixed vocal ensemble. May be repeated for credit. A public concert is given each term. The student must attend all rehearsals, sectionals, and the final performance for credit. All students who participate in the ensemble for credit receive ten individual lessons from the director or an outside professional. Pass/Fail only. Two hours a week.

MUSC 132. Manhattan College Orchestra. 1 Credit.

The study and performance of works for string and wind orchestra. May be repeated for credit. A public concert is given each term. A short audition is required. The student must attend all rehearsals, sectionals, and the final performance for credit. All students who participate in the ensemble for credit receive ten individual lessons from the director or an outside professional. Pass/Fail only. Two hours a week.

MUSC 133. Manhattan College Jazz Band. 1 Credit.

The study and performance of works for jazz ensemble. May be repeated for credit. A public concert is given each term. A short audition is required. The student must attend all rehearsals, sectionals, and the final performance for credit.All students who participate in the ensemble for credit receive ten individual lessons from the director or an outside professional. Pass/Fail only. Two hours a week.

MUSC 150. Roots: Music. 3 Credits.

An intensive and critical examination of major works of music from the medieval period to the present that contribute to an understanding of the modern world.

MUSC 151. Roots: Music (First Year Seminar). 3 Credits.

An intensive and critical examination of major works of music from the medieval period to the present that contribute to an understanding of the modern world.

MUSC 208. Piano Skills and Techniques. 3 Credits.

A course for those with much, little or no previous experience designed to promote the understanding of different styles of music through the study of the piano. The course includes instruction in piano techniques, ear training, music theory, sight reading, and music composition.

MUSC 209. Guitar Skills and Techniques. 3 Credits.

A course for those with much, little or no previous experience, designed to promote the understanding of different styles of music through the study of the guitar. The course includes instruction in guitar technique, ear training, music theory, sight reading and music composition.

MUSC 216. Introduction to World Music. 3 Credits.

A select study of the world's musical traditions from regions in Africa, the Americas, the Middle East, and South and East Asia. Through listening and class discussion, students will become familiar with various forms of music making in their historical and cultural contexts.

MUSC 220. Fundamentals of Music Theory. 3 Credits.

A study of the rudiments of music and the basic principles of harmony. Topics include rhythm, musical notation, scales, key signatures, intervals, triads, seventh chords, harmonic function, harmonic progression, and elementary counterpoint. Activities include simple composition, harmonization, analysis, ear-training and dictation drills.

MUSC 240. Catholic Mass and its Music. 3 Credits.

A Catholic Studies course surveying the structure of the Roman Mass in relation to the major reforms and debates throughout the history of the Catholic faith, including the Church's transition during the Carolingian Renaissance, the Council of Trent, the Thirty-Years Was, the reforms of Pope Pius X, and the Second Vatican Council. Ultimately, students will engage in the role of music in faith formation and how the major reforms in the Church's history have influenced the worship music of today.

MUSC 300. History of Rock and Roll. 3 Credits.

Presents a thoughtful approach to the appreciation and understanding of the history of rock and roll. Students will be introduced to a variety of factors that influenced the creation of this music, including historical, social, philosophical, and aesthetic influences. The musician's intent, working conditions, and biographical factors will also be discussed as they pertain to the creative process. Students will reinforce and expand their analytical skills by reading about and discussing the various styles of music combined to create rock and roll, including blues, country, bluegrass, and gospel music.

MUSC 305. Music In France: Paris. 3 Credits.

An on-site study of different aspects of the political, socio-economic, and cultural life of France as witnessed through the music of Paris and the surrounding region from Ancient Gaul to present-day France. The course is offered in France during the summer.

MUSC 310. History of the Broadway Musical. 3 Credits.

Presents the history of the Broadway musical within the larger context of staged musical productions, from the beginning of operetta to the current trends happening on Broadway today. The primary focus of study is the development of musical theater in New York City and its implications for the genre worldwide. Students will learn about various musical and theatrical concepts, as well as the political and socio-economic concerns of the Broadway musical of the past and of today. The opportunity for field study will be encouraged through backstage tours, attendance to current productions on Broadway, and lecture presentations at various theaters or other relevant locations in the city. Materials Fee: $100.

MUSC 323. Music and Romanticism. 3 Credits.

In the nineteenth century, U.S. and European composers explored music's potential to express deeper and more powerful emotions than any other time in Western history, including those of unconscious dream states. The old "Classical" musical structures (e.g., the music of Haydn and Mozart) began to crumble under the weight of this emphasis on feeling. Understanding how this came about will be one of the main objectives for this course. Although the primary focus of this course will be the rhetorical properties of sound, a reading knowledge of music is not necessary for the success in the course.

MUSC 325. Modern Music & The Avant - Garde. 3 Credits.

This course presents an introduction to Modern music from the end of the 19th century to the present. Throughout the semester, we will examine the many artistic movements in modernisms wake, including impressionism, expressionism, American idealism, and others as well as the rise of the avant-garde and the development of computer-generated music. This course includes visits to Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts.

MUSC 330. History of Jazz. 3 Credits.

This course investigates the evolution of jazz from its origins in late 19th-century New Orleans to its present-day manifestation as an international musical idiom. With emphasis on contextualization, specific focus is directed to the diverse but interconnected issues of race, culture, politics, commerce, and technology. Equal focus is directed to the music itself. Through the practice of critical listening, students will be conditioned to recognize various jazz styles and their constituent (musical) parts related to rhythm, improvisation, harmony, form, and instrumentation.

MUSC 345. Psychology of Music. 3 Credits.

Presents an overview of leading theories in the areas of music cognition, the perception of pitch, melody, harmony, and rhythm, the effect on emotion, the origins of music, and the nature of musical performance and composition. This course is designed to provide a working knowledge of the processes involved in listening to and creating music.

MUSC 375. Internship. 3 Credits.

Students participate in an off-campus training experience closely related to their area of study. Frequent meetings with the internship advisor and a paper are required. Internships are arranged through the Center for Career Development and must be approved in advance by the chair and the Dean of the School of Arts.

MUSC 400. Special Topics: in Music. 3 Credits.

An intensive study of a single composer, genre, period, culture, or issue facing music scholarship today. The subject studied will vary from semester to semester. Previous special topic courses include "History of Opera," "Popular Music Criticism and Journalism," "Issues in Contemporary Popular Music," "Gender and Sexuality in Popular Music," and "Music of the Caribbean".

MUSC 410. Independent Study. 3 Credits.

Individual study of a major composer or an aesthetic issue facing music scholarship today with a member of the department. Open only to students who secure the approval of the Chair of the Department and the consent of the individual instructor. A student may elect this course only once for credit towards the Minor in Music.

Theater Courses

THEA 134. The Manhattan College Players. 1 Credit.

The study and performance of theatrical works for small and large ensembles. A public performance is given each term, along with a number of cabaret and/or vaudeville presentations. Prior theatrical experience is not required. All students who participate in the ensemble for credit receive ten individual lessons from the director or an outside professional. Past/Fail grading. May be repeated for credit (maximum of three credits). Three hours a week.

THEA 190. Acting Skills and Techniques. 3 Credits.

Focuses on the basic techniques of sensory awareness, memory, improvisation, voice, character study and role preparation with emphasis on the works of Constantin Stanislavsky. Special projects include presentations and rehearsal techniques for scene study. Materials Fee: $75.

THEA 250. Modern Dance: Thought and Motion. 3 Credits.

Introduces the art of modern dance and topics that shape current thinking about the purpose and value of dance in Western society. Dance topics include modernity and autonomy, community and agency, American idealism, spirituality and the body, and post-modernism and movement. Although no dance experience is necessary, students are expected to actively participate in the creation of dance throughout the course.

THEA 260. Introduction to Theater. 3 Credits.

Provides an introduction to the analysis, research, and production of the theatrical arts and performance studies. Students will read performance texts from a variety of cultures and traditions as well as attend live performances. Lectures provide context from theater history, theory, and practice to enable nuanced reading and understanding of play texts and performances. Furthermore, students will learn about the process of creating theater (including acting, design, directing, dramaturgical work, the rehearsal process, etc.), as well as analyze and discuss plays by exploring their historical and social contexts. Materials Fee: $75.

THEA 350. Contemporary Dance Composition. 3 Credits.

Introduces principles of contemporary dance and practical methods that explore the craft of choreography. Dance topics include improvisation, Alexander Technique, motif development, randomness and aleatoric dance, movement and language, and the relationship between music and dance. Some dance experience is highly recommended as students are expected to progress quickly throughout the course.

THEA 375. Internship. 3 Credits.

Students participate in an off-campus training experience closely related to their area of study. Frequent meetings with the internship advisor and a paper are required. Internships are arranged through the Center for Career Development and must be approved in advance by the chair and the Dean of School of Arts.

THEA 400. Special Topic in Theater. 3 Credits.

An intensive study of a playwright, choreographer, director, genre, period, or issue facing theater scholarship today. The subject studied will vary semester to semester. A student may elect this course only once for credit towards the Minor in Theater.

THEA 405. Independent Study. 3 Credits.

Individual study of a major playwright, director, or aesthetic issue facing theater scholarship today with a member of the department. Open only to students who secure the approval of the Chair of the Department and the consent of the individual instructor. A student may elect this course only once for credit towards the Minor in Theater.

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