Catalog
2013-14

Government

Dr. Michael Antolik
Chair of the Department

The government (political science) major seeks to maximize students’ ability to analyze and interpret the significance of political events, institutions, behavior, and governmental processes at the local, national, and international levels. The major is designed to equip students to play more effective roles as citizens of a democratic nation and of the world and to prepare them for careers in public service, politics, diplomacy, law, business, journalism, and college teaching.

Major

Requirements for a Major

Either GOVT 150 Roots: Government or GOVT 201 Introduction to Govenment and Politics is a prerequisite for the Government major. In addition, majors must take a total of ten courses (30 credits) distributed as follows:

Both GOVT 203 United States Government and Politics and GOVT 309 Comparative Politics, to be taken early in the major.

One 300-level course from each of the following five major areas:

  1. U.S. government, either GOVT 303 The United States Congress, GOVT 306 The United States Presidency, or GOVT 320 United States Parties, Public Opinion, and Voting Behavior
  2. Comparative governments of Europe
  3. Comparative government of any other world region
  4. International politics, either GOVT 351 International Relations, GOVT 352 International Organizations, or GOVT 357 United States Foreign Policy
  5. Political theory

One 400-level senior seminar.

A minimum grade of C in departmental courses is necessary to fulfill the requirements for the major. Majors intending to apply to law school are expected to take at least one term of GOVT 323 Constitutional Law: Governmental Powers or GOVT 324 Constitutional Law: Civil Liberties. Students intending to attend graduate school in political science should take GOVT 210 Scope and Methods of Political Science, or SOC 307 Research Methods.

Minor

Requirements for a Minor

The minor is available to students in all schools. GOVT 150 Roots: Government or GOVT 201 Introduction to Govenment and Politics is required for the Government minor. Students are required to take 12 additional credits, including GOVT 203 United States Government and Politics, GOVT 309 Comparative Politics, and two other government courses, and receive a grade of C or better in each. Majors and minors are advised to start with GOVT 150 Roots: Government or GOVT 201 Introduction to Govenment and Politics and take GOVT 203 United States Government and Politics and GOVT 309 Comparative Politics before selecting other courses.

Requirements for a Major Concentration in the School of Education

Students concentrating in Government must take a total of eight courses, including GOVT 201 Introduction to Govenment and Politics, GOVT 203 United States Government and Politics GOVT 309 Comparative Politics, and any other five courses. Students who have taken GOVT 150 Roots: Government should select another Government course in place of GOVT 201 Introduction to Govenment and Politics. A minimum grade of C in departmental courses is necessary to fulfill the requirements for the major concentration.

United States Government

GOVT 203United States Government and Politics3
GOVT 303The United States Congress3
GOVT 306The United States Presidency3
GOVT 315State and Local Government in the United States3
GOVT 318Community Organizing for Social Change3
GOVT 319Government and Business: Political Economy3
GOVT 320United States Parties, Public Opinion, and Voting Behavior3
GOVT 321Urban Government and Politics3
GOVT 322Public Administration3
GOVT 323Constitutional Law: Governmental Powers3
GOVT 324Constitutional Law: Civil Liberties3
GOVT 325Special Topics: United States Government3
GOVT 405Special Topics Senior Seminar: United States Government and Politics3
GOVT 412Senior Seminar: Women in Politics3
GOVT 426Senior Seminar: The Politics of Race, Ethnicity, and Class in the United States3

Comparative Politics

GOVT 309Comparative Politics3
GOVT 310Special Topics: Comparative Politics3
GOVT 330Government and Politics of Western Europe3
GOVT 331Government and Politics of Russia and Selected Soviet Succesor States3
GOVT 332Government and Politics of Central and Eastern Europe3
GOVT 340Government and Politics of Asia3
GOVT 343Government and Politics of the Middle East3
GOVT 344Government and Politics of Caribbean 3
GOVT 345Government and Politics of Latin America3
GOVT 346Government and Politics of Africa3
GOVT 348Government and Politics of the European Union3
GOVT 440Senior Seminar: European Politics3

Global Politics

GOVT 223Environmental Politics3
GOVT 251Global Issues3
GOVT 254Global Cities3
GOVT 350Special Topics: Global Politics3
GOVT 351International Relations3
GOVT 352International Organizations3
GOVT 353Technology and Society3
GOVT 357United States Foreign Policy3
GOVT 420Senior Seminar: Conflict Resolution3
GOVT 450Senior Seminar: Politics of International Economics3
GOVT 452Special Topics Seminar3
GOVT 455Senior Seminar: Diplomacy3

Political Theory

GOVT 370Special Topics: Political Theory3
GOVT 371United States Political Thought3
GOVT 374Western Political Thought3
GOVT 473Senior Seminar: Contemporary Western Political Thought3
GOVT 480Special Topics Senior Seminar: Political Theory3

Special Programs

GOVT 212Wall Street3
GOVT 222Power in the City3
GOVT 375Internship3
GOVT 457Model United Nations I3
GOVT 458Model United Nations II3
GOVT 475Internship3
GOVT 490Albany Session Internship12
GOVT 491Washington Center Course12
GOVT 493Washington Center Semester3
GOVT 494American University Seminar Program0-15
GOVT 449Independent Study3

 

Courses

GOVT 150. Roots: Government. 3 Credits.

An explanation and critical examination of selected concepts in the social sciences. Students examine selected concepts and debates in government and political science through exploration of contemporary issues. Open only to students in the School of Arts and School of Science. (Not open to students who have completed GOVT 201.).

GOVT 201. Introduction to Govenment and Politics. 3 Credits.

This course examines selected concepts and debates in government and political science through exploration of contemporary issues. (Not open to students who have completed GOVT 150.).

GOVT 203. United States Government and Politics. 3 Credits.

An introductory course about the foundation of the U.S. Government, its institutions and how they work, and how individuals, organizations, and corporations participate in the political process leading to public policy.

GOVT 205. Political Geography. 3 Credits.

A study of states and other political units in the context of their physical, human, economic, cultural, strategic, and other features that are relevant to power and ultimately the course of history.

GOVT 207. Introduction to Peace Studies. 3 Credits.

This course introduces students to the nature, scope, and methodology of Peace Studies as well as explores some major contemporary problems that threaten peaceful and just relations between individuals, groups, or nations.

GOVT 210. Scope and Methods of Political Science. 3 Credits.

Contemporary orientations and scientific concepts in political inquiry; student research using modern techniques.

GOVT 212. Wall Street. 3 Credits.

The interactions among the world’s investors, investment institutions, and various self-regulatory bodies involved in the capital markets. Stocks, bonds, mutual funds, hedge funds, derivatives, and many other investment instruments as well as psychological mindsets directing the markets will be investigated. Includes field trips for practical, on-the scene insights into Wall Street operations, employment possibilities, and the stock market’s role in everyone’s life.

GOVT 222. Power in the City. 3 Credits.

Significant buildings and public works are used as historical case studies of personal,interest group, economic, or political power in the development of the city. Students must be prepared to walk about five miles over several hours, rain or shine.

GOVT 223. Environmental Politics. 3 Credits.

Analyzes United States and global environmental politics and major issues involved in ecological sustainability and development, including resource management, pollution control, and climate change.

GOVT 251. Global Issues. 3 Credits.

This course will highlight the interrelatedness of political, economic, ecological, and cultural events as they affect nations, regions, and the global community. The course is designed to illuminate the complex nature of world events and the nature of international studies.

GOVT 254. Global Cities. 3 Credits.

Studies several global or world cities, investigating how cities have built nations and dominated beyond national bases, looking at the characteristics of a global city, the different bases of international status, and the changing forms of urbanization due to new technology and environmental factors.

GOVT 303. The United States Congress. 3 Credits.

Analysis of the dynamics, organization and policy-making processes of the United States Congress: The relationship of legislators to constituents, lobbyists, bureaucrats, the President and one another.

GOVT 306. The United States Presidency. 3 Credits.

Exploration of the institution of the U.S. Presidency, its powers, paradoxes, limitations and responsibilities. Analysis of the Presidential selection process, as well as examination of Presidential leadership in domestic and foreign policy arenas.

GOVT 309. Comparative Politics. 3 Credits.

A survey of the institutions, processes and major problems of selected governments in contemporary states. The structures and ideologies of different regimes, the relationship of the individual to the state, and the adaptation of systems to changing conditions will be compared.

GOVT 310. Special Topics: Comparative Politics. 3 Credits.

Explores the politics of a particular country or a particular topic within comparative politics. Specific topics vary and are announced by the department.

GOVT 315. State and Local Government in the United States. 3 Credits.

The history and development of federalism in the United States political system, with emphasis on contemporary state and local political institutions and public policy issues. Governmental structures and processes are considered in relation to policy outcomes.

GOVT 318. Community Organizing for Social Change. 3 Credits.

Community organizing is a strategy that has empowered individuals and communities to make social change. It has been a major factor in shaping the Bronx, the college's home, as it is today. The class will provide a historical perspective on community organizing and assist in developing skills critical to organizing, such as discussing the role of the organizer, identifying and researching issues, developing leaders and developing an organizing campaign. The class would include opportunities for real-world experience with a local community organization.

GOVT 319. Government and Business: Political Economy. 3 Credits.

A survey of alternative economic ideologies, the private and public sectors, the interplay between them, and the formulation of economic public policy.

GOVT 320. United States Parties, Public Opinion, and Voting Behavior. 3 Credits.

Analysis of the development, organization, and functions of political parties in the United States; the relationship of parties to public opinion, elections, and voter behavior.

GOVT 321. Urban Government and Politics. 3 Credits.

This course examines of government and politics in major United States cities and suburbs. Impact of urban political, economic and social elites, labor, ethnic and racial groups, state and federal governments on urban politics and public policy. Analysis of selected metropolitan problems.

GOVT 322. Public Administration. 3 Credits.

The role of government bureaucracies in implementing out public policies. The examination of administrative processes with special emphasis on administrative behavior and decision-making.

GOVT 323. Constitutional Law: Governmental Powers. 3 Credits.

Case studies of Supreme Court decisions relating to the powers of the national government and the separate branches; judicial review; federal-state relations; as well as the commerce, taxing, spending, treaty-making and war powers.

GOVT 324. Constitutional Law: Civil Liberties. 3 Credits.

Case studies of judicial decision on the rights of individuals; first amendment freedoms, equal protection of the laws, rights of defendants.

GOVT 325. Special Topics: United States Government. 3 Credits.

A course exploring a particular topic within United States Government. Specific topics vary and are announced by the department.

GOVT 330. Government and Politics of Western Europe. 3 Credits.

A comparative analysis of political institutions and behavior in Britain, France, Germany, and other selected Western European states, and an examination of their increasing integration through the European Union.

GOVT 331. Government and Politics of Russia and Selected Soviet Succesor States. 3 Credits.

Examines the development, structure, and functions of Soviet political institutions, with special attention to the role of the Communist Party. Examines glasnost, perestroika and the disintegration of the U.S.S.R., and new successor republics.

GOVT 332. Government and Politics of Central and Eastern Europe. 3 Credits.

Explores the remarkable changes in the region from the end of World War II, through the Soviet socialist regimes, to the startling movements for change in 1989, to the nations of today.

GOVT 340. Government and Politics of Asia. 3 Credits.

The politics of the leaders, the institutions in which they operate, and the impact their policies have on their citizens as well as the whole Pacific Basin. Particular attention will be paid to China, Japan, Vietnam, Indonesia, and India.

GOVT 343. Government and Politics of the Middle East. 3 Credits.

Comparative study of the political organizations, institutions and groups in the Middle East. Discussion of politics in selected countries, as well as analysis of national and regional conflicts and the roles of the major powers in the area.

GOVT 344. Government and Politics of Caribbean . 3 Credits.

Comparative study of the politics of selected Caribbean nation-states. Analyzes their diverse colonial heritages, political cultures, ideologies, institutions, groups, and changing development strategies (including regional integration efforts), and domestic and global challenges.

GOVT 345. Government and Politics of Latin America. 3 Credits.

Comparative study of the political organizations, institutions and groups in Latin America. Discussion of politics in selected countries, as well as analysis of national and regional conflicts and change and the role of the United States in the region.

GOVT 346. Government and Politics of Africa. 3 Credits.

Impact of traditional culture, Western colonialism and neocolonialism on contemporary African ideologies, political organizations, institutions and groups. Nation-building strategies for overcoming underdevelopment and dependence.

GOVT 348. Government and Politics of the European Union. 3 Credits.

Examines the evolution of the institutions and policies of the European Community. Gives students an understanding of the European dynamic and the economic integration of Europe, as well as the obstacles to further political integration.

GOVT 350. Special Topics: Global Politics. 3 Credits.

An extensive examination and analysis of salient issues in global politics.

GOVT 351. International Relations. 3 Credits.

Analyzes various factors underlying war, peace, diplomacy, economic policy and other means by which international actors conduct their relations with one another.

GOVT 352. International Organizations. 3 Credits.

Examines the nature, functions, operations, and politics of the United Nations and global, regional, or specialized international bodies.

GOVT 353. Technology and Society. 3 Credits.

Examines how gadgets, techniques, hardware, and software, interact with people for better and occasionally for worse, and how governments consider difficult trade-offs in their policy-making.

GOVT 357. United States Foreign Policy. 3 Credits.

Examines ideology, decision-making processes, instruments, and major issues of contemporary United States foreign policy.

GOVT 370. Special Topics: Political Theory. 3 Credits.

An extensive examination and analysis of salient political thinkers and the impact of their ideas on contemporary political systems.

GOVT 371. United States Political Thought. 3 Credits.

Analysis from original sources of major United States political and constitutional writers from colonial times to the present.

GOVT 374. Western Political Thought. 3 Credits.

Introduction to modern Western political theory through examining the written dialogue (between philosophers) that has contributed to what we know as the canon on the state and society in the West.

GOVT 375. Internship. 3 Credits.

Students participate in an off-campus training experience closely related to their area of study. Frequent meetings with the internship advisor and a paper are required. Internships are arranged through the Center for Career Development and must be approved in advance by the chair and the Dean of the School of Arts. General elective credit only.

GOVT 405. Special Topics Senior Seminar: United States Government and Politics. 3 Credits.

An in-depth exploration of a specific political issue through class discussion, student research papers, and in-class presentations. Open to seniors or others by permission of the Department Chair.

GOVT 412. Senior Seminar: Women in Politics. 3 Credits.

The struggles of the nineteenth Century feminists, the suffrage amendment movement and the contemporary women's movement as political action. Urban/metropolitan women as vanguard of the mid-twentieth century (Third Wave) American women's movement. Cross-cultural, cross-national comparisons of the concerns that mobilize women, their attainment of political power, and the impact of their activities on public policy.

GOVT 420. Senior Seminar: Conflict Resolution. 3 Credits.

Analysis of sources of conflict and study of methods of conflict management and resolution at the interpersonal, neighborhood, national and international levels. Open to seniors or others by permission of the Department Chair.

GOVT 426. Senior Seminar: The Politics of Race, Ethnicity, and Class in the United States. 3 Credits.

Analysis of the ignoble paradoxes of American freedom and democracy that are embodied in Indian genocide, African enslavement, social annihilation, white supremacist ideologies and racism. A study of leaders and mass movements that pushed United States' society and its political institutions in the direction of greater racial ethnic and class equality and justice.

GOVT 430. Senior Seminar: Comparative Politics. 3 Credits.

Course descriptions will be announced when courses are offered.

GOVT 440. Senior Seminar: European Politics. 3 Credits.

Focuses on the government and politics in a selected European country. Open to seniors or others by permission of the Department Chair.

GOVT 449. Independent Study. 3 Credits.

Permission of Department Chair required.

GOVT 450. Senior Seminar: Politics of International Economics. 3 Credits.

The interface of governmental authority and politics on the one hand and economics on the other and the outcomes of this relationship in a global political economy and the management of economic change.

GOVT 452. Special Topics Seminar. 3 Credits.

An in-depth exploration of a specific global issue through class discussion, student research papers and in-class presentations.

GOVT 455. Senior Seminar: Diplomacy. 3 Credits.

Survey of development and practices of diplomacy through investigation of negotiation, coercion, crisis, management, diplomatic settlement, and security cooperation among states. Open to seniors or others by permission of the Department Chair.

GOVT 457. Model United Nations I. 3 Credits.

A hands-on, participatory experience in which students acquire expertise on a particular country which they represent at the five-day National Model United Nations Conference in New York City. The U.N. simulation is designed to reinforce an understanding of the basic principles of the international organization, such as maintaining international peace and security, developing better relations among nations based on respect, equal rights, and self-determination of peoples, and the adjustment and settlement of international disputes. Prerequisite: GOVT 352 and/or permission of the instructor.

GOVT 458. Model United Nations II. 3 Credits.

A hands-on, participatory experience in which students will acquire expertise on a particular country which they will represent at the five-day National Model United Nations Conference in New York City. The UN simulation is designed to reinforce an understanding of the basic principles of the world organization, such as maintaining international peace and security, developing better relations among nations based on respect, equal rights and self-determination of peoples and the adjustment and settlement of international disputes. Prerequisite: GOVT 352 and permission of instructor.

GOVT 473. Senior Seminar: Contemporary Western Political Thought. 3 Credits.

Examines the major political thinkers who have contributed to the notion of statecraft in the West since WW II. Open to seniors or others by permission of the Department Chair.

GOVT 475. Internship. 3 Credits.

Students participate in an off-campus training experience closely related to their area of study. Frequent meetings with the internship advisor and a paper are required. Internships are arranged through the Center for Career Development and must be approved in advance by the chair and the Dean of the School of Arts. Credit may apply to majors.

GOVT 480. Special Topics Senior Seminar: Political Theory. 3 Credits.

An in-depth exploration of a specific topic or political thinkers (Western or non-Western) through class discussion, student research papers, and in-class presentations. Open to seniors or others by permission of the Department Chair.

GOVT 490. Albany Session Internship. 6-12 Credit.

Sponsored by the New York State Assembly or Senate. The NY State Legislature semester internship enables students to participate in state government. It includes practical research and administrative experience and two courses on Legislative Politics and Conflict Resolution. Grades are pass/fail. Permission of the department chair and Dean required. Deadline for application is in October.

GOVT 491. Washington Center Course. 12 Credits.

Students intern four days a week in Washington, D.C., take an evening course, attend lectures, participate in field trips and other activities organized by The Washington Center (www.twc.edu). Programs include: Americas Leaders, Congressional Leadership, International Affairs, Law and Criminal Justice, Nonprofit Leaders, and several more. Students register for 491 (Washington Center Course), 493 (Washington Center Portfolio), and 6 COOP internship credits. Students wishing to earn 15 credits may take an additional course. Permission of the Department Chair and Dean required.

GOVT 492. Washington D.C. Seminar Internship. 3 Credits.

Students intern with the program of a Washington D.C. university like Catholic or Georgetown. They may take other courses at the University to make a full schedule. Permission of the department chair and Dean required.

GOVT 493. Washington Center Semester. 3 Credits.

Students intern 4 1/2 days a week in Washington, D.C., take an evening course, attend lectures, participate in field trips and other activities organized by The Washington Center (www.twc.edu) Programs include: Americas Leaders, Congressional Leadership, International Affairs, Law and Criminal Justice, Nonprofit Leaders and several more. Students register for 491 (Washington Center Course), 493 (Washington Center Portfolio), and 6 COOP internship credits. Students wishing to earn 15 credits may take an additional course. Permission of the department chair and Dean required. Fall/Spring/Summer.

GOVT 494. American University Seminar Program. 0-15 Credit.

Students spend a semester studying and interning in Washington, D.C., earning 12-15 credits. Program choices include: American Politics, Economic Policy, Foreign Policy, Gender and Politics, International Business and Trade, International Environment and Development, Information Technology and Telecom Policy, Journalism, Justice, Peace and Conflict Resolution, Public Law, and Transforming Communities. Permission of the department chair, Dean and Program Liaison required.

GOVT 499. Independent Study. 3 Credits.

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