Catalog
2014-15

Religious Studies

Dr. Michele Saracino
Chair of the Department

Introduction

The mission of the Religious Studies Department fulfills the mission of Manhattan College by seeking to provide a contemporary, person-centered educational experience characterized by high academic standards, reflection on faith, values, and ethics, and lifelong career preparation. These goals are accomplished through our nine-credit requirement that includes:

  1. A course that introduces the study of religion as an academic discipline and global phenomenon
  2. A course that explores the riches of the Catholic intellectual tradition
  3. A course that raises awareness of global and/or contemporary issues

Our goals for majors and minors include an ability to critically read and analyze religious texts, a facility with the methods of the academic study of religion, a familiarity with specific religious traditions, and an understanding of the role that religion plays in contemporary life. The introductory course focuses on a particular theme while introducing students to some of the research tools used in the academic study of religion. A Roman Catholic concentration is offered and a Roman Catholic interdisciplinary minor, in cooperation with other departments, may be elected. In addition, students may write a 6 credit honors thesis for departmental honors recognition.

College Religious Studies Requirements

Students of each school at Manhattan College must complete 9 credits in Religious Studies, including RELS 151 The Nature and Experience of Religion (First Year Seminar) in the first year and two 3 credit elective courses in the following years. Students elect one course from Elective Group A (Catholic Studies) and one from Elective Group B (Global Studies and Contemporary Issues). See below for a list of courses meeting these requirements.

Requirements for a Major in Religious Studies

Students majoring in Religious Studies must complete RELS 151 The Nature and Experience of Religion (First Year Seminar) and 27 credits in courses numbered 200 and above, including four courses at the 400 level. These courses are selected in consultation with the Department Chair. The elective courses will ordinarily include at least 1 course from each of the following areas of study:

  1. Biblical studies
  2. Christian theology
  3. Ethics
  4. World religious traditions

For serious reasons, one of the majors’ seminars may be waived by the Chair and another acceptable course substituted. A minimum grade of C is required for credit toward the major.

Please note: Students intending to major must register with the Department Chair.

Requirements for a Minor in Religious Studies

Students minoring in Religious Studies must complete at least RELS 151 The Nature and Experience of Religion (First Year Seminar) and 12 credits in departmental courses numbered 200 and above, including 1 course at the 400 level.

Please note: Students intending to minor must register with the Department Chair.

Concentration in Catholic Studies

A student who majors or minors in Religious Studies may choose to concentrate on the Catholic tradition. This concentration focuses on Catholic beliefs, religious practices, moral teachings, and attitudes to other religious traditions, both in terms of the historical development of Catholicism and as subjects of contemporary discussion and debate. An academic and critical program, the Concentration in Catholic Studies aims at providing the interested student with an understanding of the diversity and richness of the Catholic tradition. The School of Arts also offers an interdisciplinary minor in Catholic Studies.

Those majoring in Religious Studies who wish to pursue the Concentration in Catholic Studies must complete RELS 151 The Nature and Experience of Religion (First Year Seminar), 4 courses at the 400-level, and 18 credits from the following:

RELS 210Jesus3
RELS 213Catholic Thought3
RELS 216Saints and Catholic Imagination3
RELS 225Contemporary Catholicism3
RELS 232Catholic Moral Theology3
RELS 243Early Christian Thought3
RELS 244The Catholic Mystics3
RELS 245Medieval Christian Thought3
RELS 254Catholic Social Teaching3
RELS 204Religion and Social Justice3

Those minoring in Religious Studies who wish to pursue the Concentration in Catholic Studies must complete RELS 151 The Nature and Experience of Religion (First Year Seminar) or RELS 210 Jesus, 2 courses at the 400-level, and 6 credits from the courses listed above.

Religious Studies Honors Thesis

Both majors and those completing a minor with a 3.5 or greater cumulative index are eligible to develop a year-long independent research project under the supervision of a major reader and a second reader. In fall semester, the student registers for RELS 481 Honors Thesis I. In the spring, the student will present a completed and revised honors thesis RELS 482 Honors Thesis II to the readers. Upon the successful completion of this process, the Religious Studies Department will award the student with honors recognition.

Courses Meeting the College Religious Studies Requirements

Freshman Year

RELS 151 The Nature and Experience of Religion (First Year Seminar)

Elective Group A: Catholic Studies

This requirement is usually met in the sophomore year. In addition to the following courses, a few courses offered by other departments also meet the Catholic Studies requirement. These include ART 260 Monasticism and the Arts, MUSC 240 Catholic Mass and its Music, and PHIL 301 Faith and Reason. Students should check with their advisors for a list of additional courses.

RELS 200Special Topic: in Religion3
RELS 205Urban America and Catholic Social Teaching3
RELS 207Central Themes New Testament3
RELS 209Paul3
RELS 210Jesus3
RELS 213Catholic Thought3
RELS 216Saints and Catholic Imagination3
RELS 225Contemporary Catholicism3
RELS 226Contemporary Catholic Theologians3
RELS 232Catholic Moral Theology3
RELS 243Early Christian Thought3
RELS 244The Catholic Mystics3
RELS 245Medieval Christian Thought3
RELS 254Catholic Social Teaching3
RELS 227The Gospel of John3
*

Prerequisite for all 400-level courses: Open only to Religious Studies majors and minors or by permission of instructor.

Elective Group B: Global Studies and Contemporary Issues

RELS 206Understanding the Bible3
RELS 231Eastern Christianity3
RELS 300Special Topics in Religious Studies3
RELS 321Psychology and Religion3
RELS 336Native American Religions3
RELS 337The American Religious Experience3
RELS 238Theologies of Liberation3
RELS 341Judaism3
RELS 342Islam and Politics3
RELS 353Religions of Africa3
RELS 354Buddhism: Its Development and Interpretation3
RELS 355Islam3
RELS 357Religions of China & East Asia3
RELS 358Religions of India3
RELS 359Afro-Caribbean Religions3
RELS 361Yoga: Philosophy, Praxis, and Art3
RELS 362Ethics in the Workplace3
RELS 363Religious Faith and the Arts3
RELS 366Religion and Contemporary Art3
RELS 372Religion and Science3
RELS 373Death as a Fact of Life3
RELS 374Women in Western Religion3
RELS 375Religion and the Body3
RELS 376Religion and the Media3
RELS 377Religion and Environmentalism3
RELS 381Religious Dimensions of Peace3
RELS 390Sexuality and the Sacred3
RELS 204Religion and Social Justice3
RELS 235Reformation Theology3
RELS 367The Bible in American Culture3
RELS 333Non-Violent Revolution3
RELS 351God and Evil3
RELS 364Comparative Religion3
RELS 480Religious Studies Tutorial *3
RELS 481Honors Thesis I *3
*

Prerequisite for all 400-level courses: Open only to Religious Studies majors and minors or by permission of instructor.

Courses

RELS 110. The Nature and Experience of Religion. 3 Credits.

Religion as a human phenomenon and its transcendent elements. Contemporary approaches to the problem of religious beliefs and faith. A study of the problems of religious language, myth, symbolism and ritual. The relations between religion and culture with special reference to contemporary questions. Offered every semester.

RELS 151. The Nature and Experience of Religion (First Year Seminar). 3 Credits.

Religion as a human phenomenon and its transcendent elements. Contemporary approaches to the problem of religious beliefs and faith. A study of the problems of religious language, myth, symbolism and ritual. The relations between religion and culture with special reference to contemporary questions. Offered every semester.

RELS 200. Special Topic: in Religion. 3 Credits.

An intensive study of a topic in Catholic Studies. The subject will vary from semester to semester. Pre-requisite: RELS 110 or RELS 151.

RELS 202. US Latino/a Catholicism. 3 Credits.

This course explores the phenomenon of U.S. Latino/a Catholicism through an investigation of its history, figures, themes, and current controversies. It examines hos Latino/a theology articulates itself as an explicitly contextual theology that accounts for the role of popular religiosity and devotion, race, class, and gender in its thought. Pre-requisite: RELS 110 or RELS 151.

RELS 204. Religion and Social Justice. 3 Credits.

The role of religion in the economic, political, and cultural life of the underclass in New York as interpreted through biblical insight and Roman Catholic social teaching. Site visits to such places as homeless shelters, social action groups, Wall Street, inner-city churches, the United Nations. Pre-requisite: RELS 110 or RELS 151.

RELS 205. Urban America and Catholic Social Teaching. 3 Credits.

An interdisciplinary, service learning course. Sociological, political science, economic analysis of urban poverty, combined with reflections on Catholic social teaching, provide the framework for student-volunteer work at various Bronx-based community organizations. Pre-requisite: RELS 110 or RELS 151.

RELS 206. Understanding the Bible. 3 Credits.

How the Bible was formed; how to read the Bible. Use of historical and critical methods to examine texts, authorship, literary forms, transmission through manuscripts and translations. Pre-requisite: RELS 110 or RELS 151.

RELS 207. Central Themes New Testament. 3 Credits.

The development of the Christian Scriptures. The history of the earliest Christian communities: the unique messages of the Evangelists and some of the methods used to understand their writings. Pre-requisite: RELS 110 or RELS 151.

RELS 209. Paul. 3 Credits.

An exploration of the earliest Christian writings and of the personality and theology of Christianity's most influential preacher. Pre-requisite: RELS 110 or RELS 151.

RELS 210. Jesus. 3 Credits.

An examination of the picture of the historical Jesus produced by recent critical scholarship of the New Testament; its implications for a contemporary Christology. Pre-requisite: RELS 110 or RELS 151.

RELS 212. The Catholic Traditions of Spain. 3 Credits.

An on-site experience based in and around Spain's capital region as part of the Manhattan-in-Madrid study-abroad program. Through a combination of classroom meetings and directed excursions, the course explores the foundational but diverse presence of Catholicism in the history of Spain as well as in its contemporary culture. Particular topics as well as course structure (semester-long or two-week intensive) may vary across offerings. Pre-requisite: RELS 110 or RELS 151.

RELS 213. Catholic Thought. 3 Credits.

An investigation of the Christian tradition through a survey of its major themes, including the nature and sources of Christian belief., as well as Christology, ecclesiology, spirituality and theological anthropology. Pre-requisite: RELS 110 or RELS 151.

RELS 214. Dante. 3 Credits.

An introduction to theological thought of the great medieval poet. Careful attention will be paid to The New Life and Inferno, as well as to Dante's political thought. Pre-requisite: RELS 110 or RELS 151.

RELS 216. Saints and Catholic Imagination. 3 Credits.

The course examines the function of holy men and women within their religious traditions and more especially their ethical perspectives on the contemporary world. Included will be a study of the cult of Saints, hagiography, and Saints of own time. Pre-requisite: RELS 110 or RELS 151.

RELS 218. The Bible and Film. 3 Credits.

This course will consider the historical and literacy aspects of selected biblical narratives, as well as their interpretations in contemporary film. It will also discuss biblical themes, expressions, terms, and types that have become part of American culture and are sources used by the writers and directors. This course focuses primarily on film as a form of the long history of biblical interpretation, not on film theory.

RELS 219. Self and Other. 3 Credits.

This course is a study of human existence through scripture, classical church doctrines, and contemporary theology and philosophy. Many of the issues explored in the course intersect with questions of difference, including religious conflict and diversity; race, gender, and environmental degradation; and the impact of electronic technology on interpersonal relationships. Pre-requisite: RELS 110 or RELS 151.

RELS 220. Vatican II. 3 Credits.

This course investigates the history, context, major figures, and varied themes of the Second Vatican Council. It examines the conciliar documents and the circumstances that surrounded their production in an effort to understand some of the complexity of contemporary Catholicism. The course will also consider the major conciliar documents as they relate to matters that deal with the Church itself, with the relationship of the Church to the world, and with the relationship of the Church to other religious traditions. Pre-requisite: RELS 110 or RELS 151.

RELS 221. The Psalms and Catholic Worship. 3 Credits.

A form-critical introduction to the Book of Psalms, followed by an investigation into the historical and contemporary use of the Psalms in the liturgies of the Catholic Church. Pre-requisite: RELS 110 or RELS 151.

RELS 225. Contemporary Catholicism. 3 Credits.

An exploration of the spirit, development, and new insights of the Catholic Church in the post-Vatican II era. Doctrinal, moral, ecumenical, and social questions will be examined. Pre-requisite: RELS 110 or RELS 151.

RELS 226. Contemporary Catholic Theologians. 3 Credits.

An analysis of the theological presuppositions of contemporary authors; the methodology of research (hermeneutics) as a basis for modern thinking about Catholicism; the role of human and psychological premises underlying understanding of the mystery of Christ. Pre-requisite: RELS 110 or RELS 151.

RELS 227. The Gospel of John. 3 Credits.

A study of one of the most sophisticated voices in the early Church and the forces that shaped that Church. Pre-requisite: RELS 110 or RELS 151.

RELS 231. Eastern Christianity. 3 Credits.

A study of the separated and united Churches of the Near East, their history, expansion, preservation of Christian heritage, doctrinal and disciplinary affinity with the Western or Roman Church. Includes a field trip. Pre-requisite: RELS 110 or RELS 151.

RELS 232. Catholic Moral Theology. 3 Credits.

New approaches to biblical and church authority in contemporary Christian Ethics. New options in systematic ethics: models, method, moral absolutes, and exceptions. Sin and conscience in contemporary ethical thought. The theoretical material will be illustrated by concrete reference to specific moral issues. Pre-requisite: RELS 110 or RELS 151.

RELS 233. Contemporary Christian Ethics. 3 Credits.

This course engages new approaches to biblical and church authority in contemporary Christian Ethics. Topics include new options in systematic ethics (models, method, moral absolutes, and exceptions), and sin and conscience in contemporary ethical thought. The theoretical material will be illustrated by concrete reference to specific moral issues. Pre-requisite: RELS 110 or RELS 151.

RELS 235. Reformation Theology. 3 Credits.

An investigation of the concept of reform in the Christian thought and the Reformation of the sixteenth century, including its major figures: Luther, Calvin, and Zwingli; and the role of the Catholic Reformation of the Council of Trent. Pre-requisite: RELS 110 or RELS 151.

RELS 238. Theologies of Liberation. 3 Credits.

An examination of the theologies of liberation in Africa, Asia, Latin America, and among Afro-Americans and women in the United States. Topics include dialogue among these groups, the responses of first-world theologians, the relation between religion and politics, and the place of activism in the life of a religious person. Pre-requisite: RELS 110 or RELS 151.

RELS 243. Early Christian Thought. 3 Credits.

A study of the formation of doctrines, especially those concerning God, Christ, the world, history, and their mutual relationships. Attention will also be devoted to the philosophical and political influences that shaped Christianity from the first to the eighth Century. Pre-requisite: RELS 110 or RELS 151.

RELS 244. The Catholic Mystics. 3 Credits.

A study of the mystical experience, in both its theory and practice, through the lives and writings of the great Christian mystics, past and present. Ample exposure to primary sources and field trips to mystical and contemplative centers constitute the core of this course. Pre-requisite: RELS 110 or RELS 151.

RELS 245. Medieval Christian Thought. 3 Credits.

A study of the history of Christian thought concerning the nature of humanity and the universe from Augustine through the Scholastics to the eve of the Reformation. Medieval political, theological, liturgical, and artistic expressions of Christendom will be examined. Includes a field trip. Pre-requisite: RELS 110 or RELS 151.

RELS 254. Catholic Social Teaching. 3 Credits.

A theological and ethical investigation of selected moral problems of our time, such as truth in government, violence, economic injustice, and racism, in addition to other moral issues. Pre-requisite: RELS 110 or RELS 151.

RELS 300. Special Topics in Religious Studies. 3 Credits.

An intensive study of a particular religious tradition or topic from within the fields of global studies or contemporary culture. The subject will vary from semester to semester. Pre-requisite: RELS 110 or RELS 151.

RELS 301. Introduction to Peace Studies. 3 Credits.

An introduction to the nature, scope, and methodology of Peace Studies as well as explore some major contemporary problems which threaten peaceful and just relations between groups, nations or individuals.Pre-requisite: RELS 110 or RELS 151.

RELS 302. Religion and Spanish Culture. 3 Credits.

An on-site experience based in and around Spain's capital region as part of the Manhattan-in-Madrid study abroad program. Through a combination of classroom meetings and directed excursions, the course explores the complex but foundational role of religion in the history of Spain as well as in its contemporary culture. Particular topics as well as course structure (semester-long or two-week intensive) may vary across offerings. Pre-requisite: RELS 110 or RELS 151.

RELS 306. Central Themes in the Hebrew Scriptures. 3 Credits.

This course explores important themes in the Hebrew Bible (known to Christians as the Old Testament) through analysis of religious, archaeological, literary and historical courses. Pre-requisite: RELS 110 or RELS 151.

RELS 310. Religion and the Holocaust. 3 Credits.

This course explores the question of faith post-holocaust, and the moral lessons that can be learned from the Shoah. Using theological and political approaches, the course will analyze the impact of the Holocaust (1938-1945) on Judaism, Christianity, and Islam in terms of philosophy-theology, subsequent placement in Western society, and the effect that the Holocaust has had on Western and Global society. Pre-requisite: RELS 110 or RELS 151.

RELS 312. Muslims in America. 3 Credits.

Examines the role of Muslims in American life after the 9/11 destruction of the World Trade Center. The course examines the origins of Islam in the United States, the ethnic and religious diversity of American Muslims, conflicts about gender relations and women's issues, contemporary debates about Islam's role in the public sphere, and the spirituality of American Muslims. Pre-requisite: RELS 110 or RELS 151.

RELS 314. Hinduism. 3 Credits.

"Hinduism" is one of the world's oldest major religions and one of the world's newest major religions; its name barely 300 years old. So, it is old or is it new? What is Hinduism and who defines it will be the central questions that this course will investigate. Pre-requisite: RELS 110.

RELS 321. Psychology and Religion. 3 Credits.

n examination of ways in which psychology has both broadened and challenged the understanding of religion; study of such topics as self, psyche, symbolism, psychotherapy, and spiritual methods. Pre-requisite: RELS 110 or RELS 151.

RELS 333. Non-Violent Revolution. 3 Credits.

A study of the theory and practice of non-violence as found in select contemporary leaders, including Mohandas K. Ghandhi, Martin Luther King, Jr., Cesar Chavez, Vinoba Bhave, Danilo Dolce, and Helder Camara. The course also examines the theological and ethical foundations of non-violent revolution. Pre-requisite: RELS 110 or RELS 151.

RELS 336. Native American Religions. 3 Credits.

A study of the principal rites, stories, and religious symbols of the indigenous communities of North America through the study of selected tribes or nations. Various research approaches and popular media portrayal of the "Indians" will also be discussed. Pre-requisite: RELS 110 or RELS 151.

RELS 337. The American Religious Experience. 3 Credits.

A survey of the rich history as well as varied landscape of religion in the United States. Considerations include the notable variety of traditions new and old in addition to recurring patterns of an enduring “civil religion” at work in American culture. Pre-requisite: RELS 110 or RELS 151.

RELS 341. Judaism. 3 Credits.

An introductory survey of post-biblical Judaism. Topics include rabbinic texts and the emergence of rabbinic Judaism, Jewish holidays and practices, contemporary Judaism, and the religious aspects of the nation of Israel. Pre-requisite: RELS 110 or RELS 151.

RELS 342. Islam and Politics. 3 Credits.

An investigation into the relationship between religious and political thought of the peoples of Islam. Selected Quranic texts and Hadiths will be studied for their political content. The history of political Islam and the contemporary Islamic scene throughout the world will be featured elements of the course. Pre-requisite: RELS 110 or RELS 151.

RELS 351. God and Evil. 3 Credits.

Who is God? Why is there evil in the world? The course will explore these fundamental religious questions by examining the relationshiop between differing concepts of God and evil. Course material will include classical texts and contemporary Jewish, Christian, and Pagan writings. Pre-requisite: RELS 110 or RELS 151.

RELS 353. Religions of Africa. 3 Credits.

This course is a study of present-day religious beliefs, ceremonies, and practices in Africa. The course engages the religious worldviews of Islam, Christianity, and traditional African religions, with special attention to issues of race and gender. Pre-requisite: RELS 110 or RELS 151.

RELS 354. Buddhism: Its Development and Interpretation. 3 Credits.

A study of the principles of Buddhist thought together with a reading of various Theravada and Mahayana texts. The course will address problems of philosophical interpretation, historical development and cultural transformation. Pre-requisite: RELS 110 or RELS 151.

RELS 355. Islam. 3 Credits.

An introductory survey of the origins and religious teachings of Islam, with special attention to the Islamic views of providence, revelation, worship, and moral obedience. Community, social justice, and revolutionary thought in the contemporary Islamic world will also be discussed. Pre-requisite: RELS 110 or RELS 151.

RELS 357. Religions of China & East Asia. 3 Credits.

A survey of the religious traditions of the cultures of the Far East. Examines Confucianism, Taoism, and Far Eastern forms of Buddhism as well as the cultural background, beliefs, practices, art, and literature of these religions. Pre-requisite: RELS 110 or RELS 151.

RELS 358. Religions of India. 3 Credits.

A survey of the religions that began in India: Hinduism, Jainism, and Buddhism. Traces the historical development of these religions from the time of the Vedas to Mahatma Gandhi. The survey will focus on the religious beliefs, practices, and literature of these different groups. Pre-requisite: RELS 110 or RELS 151.

RELS 359. Afro-Caribbean Religions. 3 Credits.

An interdisciplinary survey of major creole traditions—including Santeria, Vodun, Rastafari, and Obeah—that developed through the unique encounter of West African, Christian, Native American, and Asian elements in the plantation societies of the Caribbean. A critical assessment of the cosmologies, rituals, and theologies of these traditions, as well as their implications for enhancing the academic study of religion, forms the focus of the course. Pre-requisite: RELS 110 or RELS 151.

RELS 361. Yoga: Philosophy, Praxis, and Art. 3 Credits.

A cross-cultural and interdisciplinary introduction to the nature of yoga, including its philosophical underpinnings, iconographical representations and practices. Materials will be drawn from Hinduism, the Buddhisms of Tibet and Japan, and Carmelite Christianity. In addition, contemporary neuropsychological approaches will be explored. The course will be enhanced by field trips that explore the art and practices of these areas. Pre-requisite: RELS 110 or RELS 151.

RELS 362. Ethics in the Workplace. 3 Credits.

An investigation of the ethical challenges, from the personal to the global, that arise in the context of the workplace. Texts will feature case studies and analysis of issues ranging from honesty and fidelity to consumption patterns, organizational structure, and corporate ethos. Students will be introduced to theories in both philosophical and theological ethics that will provide critical tools to help determine a coherent and defensible ethic for their working lives. Pre-requisite: RELS 110 or RELS 151.

RELS 363. Religious Faith and the Arts. 3 Credits.

An exploration of the ways in which religious faith is expressed through the arts, including the visual, performing, and plastic arts. Some of the course will take place off-campus in the theaters, museums, concert halls, and churches of New York City. Pre-requisite: RELS 110 or RELS 151.

RELS 364. Comparative Religion. 3 Credits.

This course will examine contemporary issues arising within religious studies that allow us to compare religions. Material will be drawn from both Western and Asian religious traditions; topics will focus on such issues as God, mysticism, evil, creation and/or salvation. Pre-requisite: RELS 110 or RELS 151.

RELS 366. Religion and Contemporary Art. 3 Credits.

A study of the ways in which contemporary artists explore sacred themes, such as the construction of utopia, the development of community, and the search for transcendence. The course follows various artists and movements of the 20th and 21st centuries, and the ways in which they reflect upon modern religious life. The course shows how the sacred has remained a relevant concern for artists from modern to postmodern art. Pre-requisite: RELS 110 or RELS 151.

RELS 367. The Bible in American Culture. 3 Credits.

This course considers the place of the Bible in American public life. The course illustrates how the Bible has generated some enduring American values and how it has helped Americans form a sense of themselves through its role in social movements, politics, and the arts. Emphasis will be on the place of religion in public life, including different understandings of the principle of church and state. Pre-requisite: RELS 110 or RELS 151.

RELS 372. Religion and Science. 3 Credits.

A study of historical and contemporary interactions between religion and science, with particular reference to their political implications and ethical ramifications. Themes include biotechnology, environmentalism, the teaching of evolution, and digital technologies. Pre-requisite: RELS 110 or RELS 151.

RELS 373. Death as a Fact of Life. 3 Credits.

An examination of the religious, legal, medical, and psychological questions concerning death. Topics include the hope for life after death and the moral aspects of care for the dying and bereaved, cessation of treatment, euthanasia, and suicide.. Pre-requisite: RELS 110 or RELS 151.

RELS 374. Women in Western Religion. 3 Credits.

An exploration of the field of women's studies in religion as it intersects with new understandings of God, text, and tradition emerging within Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. The course will look at the roles of women within these three traditions and consider the question of how people bring about religious change. Pre-requisite: RELS 110 or RELS 151.

RELS 375. Religion and the Body. 3 Credits.

This course considers the role of the body in the religious imagination. Themes vary from semester to semester, but can include 1) everyday practices of eating, exercising, bathing, dressing, piercing, and tattooing, 2) traditional religious approaches to the body (especially, but not limited to, Christianity), and/or 3) contemporary transhumanist thought. Pre-requisite: RELS 110 or RELS 151.

RELS 376. Religion and the Media. 3 Credits.

A critical investigation of the significant roles of religion and media in modern life. Along with a variety of theoretical perspectives, the course examines a series of case studies that range across religious traditions and media formats. Special attention is given to analysis of how religious ideas and practices appear in the news media and in popular entertainment, as well as to reflection on the religious parameters of media uses like television viewing and online gaming. Pre-requisite: RELS 110 or RELS 151.

RELS 377. Religion and Environmentalism. 3 Credits.

Introduces the history, ideas and practices of modern environmentalism by examining references to and invocations of religion in debates about the environment from the late 18th century to the present. The course focuses especially on the emergence of environmentalism as a broad-based philosophical, political and cultural movement and thus gives special attention to careful analysis of the place of religion in foundational environmentalist works of the 20th century. Pre-requisite: RELS 110 or RELS 151.

RELS 381. Religious Dimensions of Peace. 3 Credits.

A theological and ethical inquiry into the major Jewish and Christian responses to war: pacifism, just war, and crusade. Various religious anthropologies are considered as possible ethical bases for peace in today's world, and the course engages the contemporary relevance of Reinhold Niebuhr, Mohandas K. Gandhi, Martin Luther King, Jr. and Cesar Chavez. Pre-requisite: RELS 110 or RELS 151.

RELS 390. Sexuality and the Sacred. 3 Credits.

Explores some ways in which different religious traditions have perceived the relationship between sexuality and religion. Examines the religious roots of our own cultural attitudes toward sexuality and sex roles and looks at some contemporary attempts to rethink the relationships between sexuality and spirituality, and between women and men. Pre-requisites: RELS 110 or RELS 151.

RELS 399. Criminal Justice Ethics. 3 Credits.

An investigation of the theological and ethical isues related to crime and punishment. Students will discuss questions of human nature, the purpose and meaning of confinement, the ethics of law and judgement, the role of mercy and forgiveness, and alternatives to prosecution and incarceration. In many cases, the course will be conducted at the jail on Rikers Island. Pre-requisites: RELS 110 or RELS 151.

RELS 400. Special Topic. 3 Credits.

RELS 470. Majors' Seminar. 3 Credits.

This course is an intensive study of an author, period, problem, or concern in a given religious tradition, or the comparative study of some aspect of several traditions. Topics vary from semester to semester. This seminar is open to Religious Studies majors and minors as well as to other interested students who have completed the nine-credit requirement in Religious Studies. Pre-requisites: RELS 110 or RELS 151, completion of nine credits in RELS, and permission from the Chair of Religious Studies.

RELS 475. Internship. 3 Credits.

Students participate in an off-campus training experience closely related to their area of study. Frequent meetings with the internship advisor and a paper are required. Internships are arranged through the Center of Career Development and must be approved in advance by the chair and the Dean of the School of Arts. Open to majors only.

RELS 480. Religious Studies Tutorial. 3 Credits.

Individual study under the supervision of a member of the department with the permission of the Chair. Open only to juniors and seniors majoring in Religious Studies who meet the requirements set by the Chair.

RELS 481. Honors Thesis I. 3 Credits.

The first semester of a two-semester honors thesis in Religious Studies. The honors thesis is written under a faculty advisor, who assists the student in developing research goals and selecting appropriate texts and research data. Available to Religious Studies majors with a 3.5 GPA. Permission of the department chair required.

RELS 482. Honors Thesis II. 3 Credits.

The second semester of a two-semester honors thesis in Religious Studies. The student continues the research project begun in RELS 481 and will write the honors thesis. Available to Religious Studies majors with a 3.5 GPA. Permission of the department chair required.

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