Catalog
2017-18

Engineering Science

Dr. Tim J. Ward, P.E.
Dean of Engineering

Engineering sciences are the bridge between the basic sciences and mathematics and applied engineering design. Courses include those fundamental to all engineering, such as statics, dynamics, mechanics, thermodynamics, materials, and electrical systems.

Courses

ENGS 115. Introduction to Engineering. 3 Credits.

This course is designed around a variety of engineering themes. Each theme is related to one (or more) of the engineering disciplines offered through the School of Engineering. Every theme involves project work emphasizing design, problem solving methodologies, critical thinking, and team participation. All students participate in all projects. A course objective is to acquaint all students with the areas of engineering available through the School in order to assist them in their choice of major. Ethics, professional responsibilities, and economic concerns are emphasized as part of the projects. Fall.

ENGS 116. Introduction to Engineering Computation. 3 Credits.

An introductory course in computation for the practice of engineering. Focuses on the use of structured programming using the Visual Basic programming language for the solution of engineering problems. The course will include one or more projects. By completing the projects(s), students are introduced to: use of the Internet as an information resource; software packages for engineering analysis and modeling; and computer applications for the preparation of documentation and graphics. Lecture/Lab. Spring.

ENGS 201. Materials Science. 3 Credits.

Atomic structure; crystallographic concepts; relationship of structure to properties of metals, ceramics and organic materials. Equilibrium and non-equilibrium relationships of multiphase materials. Methods for changing properties of materials. Three lectures, three-hour laboratory every second week. Fall and Spring. Prerequisite; CHEM 101.

ENGS 202. Materials Science Laboratory. 0 Credits.

This is the laboratory portion of ENGS 201. Performance in the laboratory will be incorporated in the grade received in ENGS 201. Three hour laboratory every second week. Fall and Spring.

ENGS 203. Electrical Systems. 3 Credits.

Elementary electrical concepts. Resistive networks. Nodal and mesh analysis. Dependent sources. Network theorems. Energy storing elements. Transient response of first and second order circuits. Sinusoidal excitation. Phasors. Alternating current steady state analysis. Computer-aided solutions. The curriculum is consistent with the needs of the PE examination. Four hours a week includes problem and laboratory sessions. Fall and Spring. Prerequisite: MATH 186 (or MATH 104).

ENGS 204. Environmental Engineering Principles I. 3 Credits.

Introductory course in environmental engineering designed to provide the foundation for understanding local and regional environmental problems. Topics include mass balance concepts, chemical stoichiometry, reaction kinetics, water quality evaluations for surface and ground water systems, acid rain, risk assessment, water supply, water and wastewater treatment processes, and treatment of hazardous waste. Three lectures. Fall. Must receive a minimum grade of C. Prerequisites: MATH 185 (or MATH 103).

ENGS 205. Introductory Thermodynamics. 3 Credits.

Definitions of energy systems, properties, and unit systems. work, heat, and the first law of thermodynamics in open and closed systems. Applications to compressors, pumps, turbines, heat exchanger, and nozzles. The second law of thermodynamics and its effect on energy systems. Three lectures. Fall. Prerequisites: MATH 104, CHEM 101, PHYS 101. (Cr. 3).

ENGS 206. Statics. 3 Credits.

Vector quantities, forces, and moments; resultants of force systems; free body diagrams and static equilibrium; analysis of truss, frame, and machines in static equilibrium; dry friction; belt friction; first and second moments. Three lectures. Fall and Spring. Must receive a minimum grade of C. Prerequisites: MATH 186 (or MATH 104), PHYS 101.

ENGS 220. Dynamics. 3 Credits.

Kinematics of particles and rigid bodies in planar motion, work and energy, impulse and momentum; introduction to mechanical vibration. Three lectures. Spring. Prerequisite. ENGS 206.

ENGS 230. Introduction Solid Mechanics. 3 Credits.

Analysis of stress and strain due to axial, torsional, and flexural loads; beams, shafts, columns. Elastic deformation under axial, flexural, and torsional loads. Statically determinate and indeterminate problems; principles of superposition and compatibility. Elastic column buckling. Three lectures. Fall and Spring. Must receive a minimum grade of C. Prerequisite: ENGS 206.

ENGS 301. Engineering Prof. Develop. 0 Credits.

This zero credit course is offered in order to enable an undergraduate engineering student to receive recognition for participating in professional development activities, including seminars, workshops, meetings, field trips, mentoring, etc. This course meets three hours a week and is graded P/F. May be repeated. Fall, Spring and Summer. Prerequisite: Approval of Instructor.

ENGS 401. Internship for Engineering. 0 Credits.

This zero credit course is offered so that an engineering student may receive recognition on the academic transcript indicating participation in this type of experiential learning. May be repeated.

ENGS 402. Service for Engineering Students. 0 Credits.

This zero credit course is offered so that an engineering student may receive recognition on the academic transcript indicating participation in organized service activity. This course is graded P/F. May be repeated. Fall, Spring and Summer. Prerequisite: Approval of Instructor.

ENGS 410. Student Experiential Research. 3 Credits.

This course is for those students who wish to participate in summer research with a faculty member and receive college credit. This course may be used as a technical elective in some engineering programs.

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