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Kinesiology

Dr. Shawn Ladda
Chair of the Department

Dr. Lisa Toscano
Associate Chair of the Department

Dr. Tekeyah Sears
Program Director - Public Health 


The Kinesiology Curriculum

Physical Education, Exercise Science, and Public Health

Emphasizing the positive impact of physical activity on health, society, and quality of life, the mission of the Department of Kinesiology is to create and disseminate knowledge, engage in community service, and prepare caring and competent physical education, exercise science, and public health professionals. Putting theory into practice, all students in the department gain real-world understanding through a variety of service, research, practicum, internship and student-teaching experiences. With this, every effort is made in the professional courses to correlate the theory of general education as it applies to the Physical Education Teacher K-12, Exercise Science, and Public Health majors.

The curriculum provides a strong and relevant foundation for continued study in graduate schools in such areas as physical therapy, occupational therapy, athletic training, strength & conditioning, physical education, health education, public health, special education, adapted physical activity, curriculum and instruction, supervision and administration, sport and exercise psychology, exercise physiology, sports medicine, physician assistant, and other education/health-related professions.

Kinesiology students may choose one of three majors: Physical Education Teacher K-12, Exercise Science, or Public Health.


Physical Education Teacher K-12

The mission of the Physical Education program is to create and disseminate knowledge, engage in community service, and prepare caring and competent physical education teaching professionals.The Physical Education Teacher K-12 major is designed to specifically prepare teachers and leaders for elementary and secondary schools. Physical education majors will develop the knowledge and skills necessary for success on state certification exams, in professional practice teaching K-12 physical education, and during post-graduate work associated with the physical education discipline including physical education, health education, special education, adapted physical activity, curriculum and instruction, supervision and administration, and other education related fields. The program is approved by the New York State Education Department (NYSED). Program completion leads to NYSED teaching certification in Physical Education K-12. NYSED has certification reciprocity agreements with many other states. The program is also accredited by the Association for Advancing Quality in Educator Preparation (AAQEP).

Physical Education – Program Learning Goals

  1. Content Knowledge. Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the underlying scientific foundations of physical education and its applications to planning, teaching, and evaluation. This includes critically evaluating scholarly work related to exercise science and demonstrating the ability to make practical applications based on this research.
  2. Pedagogical Knowledge and Skills. Students will be able to demonstrate pedagogical knowledge in the physical education discipline and the skills to apply this knowledge to positively impact all learners. With this, students will be able to plan, implement, and assess a variety of developmentally appropriate psychomotor, cognitive, and affective learning experiences aligned with professional standards to address the diverse needs of all learners.
  3. Cultural, Historical, and Philosophical Dimensions. Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the cultural, historical, and philosophical dimensions of physical education and its applications to planning, professional practice, and evaluation.  Within this, and consistent with our Lasallian mission, students will be able to demonstrate the appreciation of cultural diversity along with the ability to make ethical decisions based on this knowledge.
  4. Physical Activity in Health, Wellness, and Quality of Life. Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between physical activity participation and health, wellness, and quality of life.
  5. Professional Responsibility. Students will be able to demonstrate professional responsibility and the dispositions to grow professionally consistent with state and national organizations associated with the physical education teaching discipline. This goal includes demonstrating physical literacy with knowledge, skills, and competency in movement performance and health enhancing fitness as described in National Standards & Grade-Level Outcomes for K-12 Physical Education.

Minor in Adapted Physical Education

All physical education and exercise science majors are eligible for a minor in Adapted Physical Education upon completion of these courses with a grade of C or higher in each course.

KIN 423Adapted Physical Activity3
KIN 424Adapted Exercise & Sport3
KIN 421Therapeutic Recreation2
EDUC 301Nature and Needs of Students with Disabilities3
EDUC 408Management of Behavior and Learning for At-Risk and Disabled3
Total Credits14

Exercise Science

The mission of the Exercise Science program is to create and disseminate knowledge, engage in community service, and prepare caring and competent exercise science professionals. Exercise science majors will develop the knowledge and skills necessary for success in professional positions and post-graduate work associated with the exercise science and kinesiology disciplines. The program provides a solid foundation for continued graduate school study in physical therapy, occupational therapy, exercise physiology, athletic training, adapted physical activity, sport and exercise psychology, public health, health promotion/community health, sports medicine, and other health-related/medical professions. Exercise Science courses also contribute to the requirements for certification as an Exercise Specialist from the American College of Sports Medicine and/or as a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist from the National Strength and Conditioning Association.

Exercise Science – Program Learning Goals

  1. Scientific Foundations of Exercise Science. Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the underlying scientific foundations of exercise science and its applications to planning, professional practice, and evaluation. This includes critically evaluating scholarly work related to exercise science and demonstrating the ability to make practical applications based on this research.
  2. Observe, Analyze, and Evaluate Human Movement. Students will be able to observe, analyze, and evaluate human movement and apply appropriate instructional intervention. With this, students will demonstrate the ability to plan, implement, and assess a variety of developmentally appropriate physical activity experiences.
  3. Cultural, Historical, and Philosophical Dimensions. Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the cultural, historical, and philosophical dimensions of exercise science and its applications to planning, professional practice, and evaluation.  Within this, and consistent with our Lasallian mission, students will be able to demonstrate the appreciation of cultural diversity along with the ability to make ethical decisions based on this knowledge.
  4. Physical Activity in Health, Wellness, and Quality of Life. Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between physical activity participation and health, wellness, and quality of life.
  5. Professional Responsibility. Student will be able to demonstrate professional behavior consistent with the exercise science discipline including an adherence to professional ethics and service to others; and an appreciation and commitment to physical activity practice.

Preparation for Graduate Study in Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, and Other Health Professions

Students preparing for professional school admission in physical therapy, occupational therapy, and other health professions should major in Exercise Science and plan courses in consultation with their Kinesiology faculty advisor and/or the Chair of Kinesiology. Prerequisites for graduate study may include, but may not be restricted to, the following elective courses:

MATH 155Calculus for the Life Sciences I (First Year)3
or MATH 100 Pre-Calculus Mathematics
MATH 230Elementary Statistics (First Year)3
PHYS 105Principles of Physics I (Second Year - Fall)4
PHYS 195Principles of Physics I Lab0
PHYS 106Principles of Physics II (Second Year - Spring)4
PHYS 196Principles of Physics II Lab0
CHEM 101General Chemistry I (Third Year - Fall)3
CHEM 103General Chemistry Laboratory I1
CHEM 102General Chemistry II (Third Year - Spring)3
CHEM 104General Chemistry Laboratory II1
PSYC 421Abnormal Psychology (Fourth Year - substitute for KIN 303)3
Total Credits25

Exercise Science majors interested in the premedical professions (e.g., Physician's Assistant, Sports Medicine) are advised to substitute Principles of Biology (BIOL 115-118) with General Biology (BIOL 111-114) and register in BIOL 111/BIOL 113 First Year - Fall and BIOL 112/BIOL 114 First Year - Spring.

Minor in Psychology

Exercise Science majors may earn a minor in Psychology by completing 15 credits in Psychology courses planned in consultation with and approval of the Chair of the Psychology. In addition to Introduction to Psychology I (PSYC 203), suggested courses most aligned with the Exercise Science major include: Motivation & Emotion (PSYC 333), Lifespan Development (PSYC 334), Health Psychology (PSYC 341), Abnormal Psychology (PSYC 421), Physiological Psychology (PSYC 435), and Sensation & Perception (PSYC 467). 

PSYC 203Introduction to Psychology3
Additional credits in Psychology *12
Total Credits15

Minor in Business

Exercise Science majors may earn a minor in Business by completing 15 credits in Business courses with permission from the Assistant Dean of Education & Health. The minor in Business requires the completion of the following course sequence:

ACCT 201Principles of Accounting I3
ECON 203Microeconomics3
MGMT 201Introduction to Management (Economics Elective)3
MKTG 201Essentials of Marketing3
Business Elective (with proper prerequisites)3
Total Credits15

Minor in Biology

Exercise Science majors may earn a minor in Biology by completing 15 credits in Biology courses planned in consultation with and approval of the Chair of the Biology Department. Eight of these credits must be the General Biology sequence (BIOL 111-114). The remaining credits must be chosen from courses that satisfy Biology B.S. major requirements. Exercise Science majors interested in the Biology minor are advised to substitute Principles of Biology (BIOL 115-118) with General Biology (BIOL 111-114) and register in BIOL 111/BIOL 113 First Year - Fall and BIOL 112/BIOL 114 First Year - Spring.

BIOL 111General Biology I (First Year - Fall)4
BIOL 113General Biology I Laboratory0
BIOL 112General Biology II (First Year - Spring)4
BIOL 114General Biology II Laboratory0
Additional credits in Biology that satisfy Biology B.S. major requirements *7
Total Credits15

Public Health

The mission of the Public Health program is to educate students on the core principles of public health knowledge to address health outcomes of the population through equity, policy and action. Public Health majors will develop the knowledge and skills necessary for success in professional positions and post-graduate work associated with the public health disciplines. The program provides a solid foundation for continued graduate school study in public health, community health, environmental health, health care administration, biostatistics, epidemiology, health policy and management, health promotion, and other health-related professions.

Public Health – Program Learning Goals

  1. Historical and Theoretical Foundations. Students will acquire knowledge of the history of public health, epidemiology, biostatistics, environmental health sciences, management, social and behavioral sciences, and academic & research ethics, and the ability to apply that knowledge for the assessment, promotion, and protection of human health.
  2. Quantitative Tools and Evidence-Based Methods. Students will acquire knowledge of the appropriate quantitative tools and evidence-based methods to determine appropriate use of data to identify and address issues concerning population health and disease.
  3. Determinants of Health. Students will acquire knowledge of determinants of health and their contribution to health disparities.

Physical Education Teacher K-12 Major Requirements

Physical Education - Curriculum/Courses

First Year
First Year - Fall
KIN 100Intro Teaching Physical Ed2
BIOL 103Introduction to Biology3
BIOL 104Introduction to Biology Laboratory0
Modern Foreign Language 3
First Year - Spring
KIN 229Rhythmic Activities & Gymnastics2
KIN 114Small Crafts (May Camp)1
KIN 116Leisure Sports & Activities (May Camp)1
KIN 120Outdoor Adventures (May Camp)2
Modern Foreign Language3
First Year - Fall or Spring
KIN 110Personal Wellness3
KIN 246Aerobic Conditioning2
ENGL 110First Year Composition3
MATH 151Topics in Modern Mathematics3
or MATH 230 Elementary Statistics
RELS 110The Nature and Experience of Religion3
SPCH 204Fundamentals of Speech3
Second Year
Second Year - Fall
KIN 213Quality Physical Education for Elementary Schools3
KIN 337Track & Field & Country2
BIOL 207Anatomy and Physiology I4
BIOL 209Anatomy And Physiology Lab I0
EDUC 202Psychology of Adolescent Education 15 hrs. of fieldwork required3
or EDUC 303 Psychology of Childhood Education
Second Year - Spring
KIN 101Team Sports I2
KIN 217Motor Learning3
BIOL 208Anatomy and Physiology II4
BIOL 210Anatomy & Physiology II Lab0
Second Year - Fall or Spring
ART Elective3
EDUC 201Principles and Practices of Education 15 hrs. of fieldwork required3
PSYC 203Introduction to Psychology3
RELS Elective (200 Level)3
Third Year
Third Year - Fall
KIN 113Team Sports II2
KIN 306Physiology of Exercise **3
KIN 307Physiology of Exercise Lab0
KIN 331Contemporary Activities2
KIN 423Adapted Physical Activity 15 hrs. fieldwork required3
Third Year - Spring
KIN 305Quality Physical Education for Secondary Schools3
KIN 309Anatomical Kinesiology **2
KIN 315Anatomical Kinesiology Lab0
KIN 412Organization and Administration of Kinesiology2
KIN 422Curriculum & Assessment3
EDUC 360Language and Literacy 15 hrs. fieldwork required3
Third Year - Fall or Spring
EDUC 301Nature and Needs of Students with Disabilities 15 hrs. fieldwork required3
EDUC 311Teaching and Learning w/ Tech3
EDUC 408Management of Behavior and Learning for At-Risk and Disabled 10 hrs. fieldwork required3
PHIL Elective3
Educating All Students Test (EAS) upon completion of EDUC 301, EDUC 408, KIN 213, and KIN 305.
Fourth Year
Fourth Year - Fall
KIN 418Biomechanics of Human Movement **2
Fourth Year - Spring
KIN 411Principles and Philosophy of Kinesiology2
Fourth Year - Fall or Spring
KIN 2091st Aid/Emergencies/CPR *1
KIN 415Supervised Practice Teaching in Secondary Schools ***3
KIN 416Supervised Practiced Teaching in Elementary Schools ***3
SOC 201Introduction to Sociology3
ENGL Elective (Lit)3
KIN Elective 2
RELS Elective (300 Level)3
Electives 6
Content Specialty Test upon completion of KIN 418
edTPA during KIN 415 and KIN 416
Total Credits130

Physical Education majors must achieve a grade of “C” or better in all KIN courses.

Criteria for Formal Admission to Teacher Education in Physical Education

  1. Receive a grade of C+ or better in ENGL 110. Students who receive a grade of  C or C- must take ENGL 210 as a follow-up to ENGL 110. Students who receive a grade of D or lower must retake ENGL 110 .
  2. Successfully complete the Freshman and Sophomore Science Sequence, and MATH 230 or MATH 151 with a grade of "C" or better.
  3. Successfully complete KIN 110 with a grade of “C” or better. SAVE and Child Abuse requirements are contained within this course.
  4. Successfully complete the Kinesiology Majors Skills Camp (KIN 114, KIN 116, KIN 120) with a grade of "C" or better and a grade point average of 2.75 or better.
  5. Successfully complete EDUC 201 and EDUC 202 with a grade of "C" or better and a grade point average of 2.75 or better.
  6. Successfully complete KIN 213, KIN 217, and the Sophomore Skills Sequence with a grade of "C" or better and a grade point average of 2.75 or better.
  7. Have both an overall Grade Point Average and academic concentration average of 2.75 or better with a "C" or better in all academic concentration coursework.
  8. Receive a majority vote from Kinesiology faculty and exhibit professional behavior as defined by program faculty and stated on course syllabi.

Formal admission into the teacher education program. Students applying for formal admission into teacher education can receive one of three responses:

  • Unconditional admittance into the program. If the student successfully meets all criteria he/she is formally admitted into the program and may proceed with the program of studies.
  • Conditional admittance into the program. If the student has met most of the criteria and will be eligible for unconditional admittance by the end of the following semester (fifth semester) he/she may continue in the program and enroll in kinesiology or education courses for that semester. At the end of the conditional semester, the student automatically advances to unconditional admittance if all criteria are met. If the conditions are not met, the student will not be allowed to take additional upper division kinesiology or education courses until unconditional status is achieved. The student must reapply if unconditional status is not met by the end of the conditional semester.
  • Denied for admittance into the program. If a student has a number of deficiencies which will take longer than one semester to correct, his/her application will be denied. The student will not be allowed to continue with kinesiology or education classes until conditional admittance is achieved. When conditional admittance status is achieved, the student must  meet the criteria listed under conditional admittance. The student in this category must reapply for admission to teacher education in physical education when he/she can document having met the criteria for admission.

Exercise Science Major Requirements

Exercise Science - Curriculum/Courses

First Year
First Year - Fall
BIOL 131Principles of Biology I4
BIOL 133Principles of Biology Lab I0
First Year - Spring
BIOL 132Principles of Biology II4
BIOL 134Principles of Biology Lab II0
KIN 114Small Crafts (May Camp)1
KIN 116Leisure Sports & Activities (May Camp)1
KIN 120Outdoor Adventures (May Camp)2
Fall or Spring
KIN 110Personal Wellness3
KIN 246Aerobic Conditioning2
CMPT 155Computer Applications for Life Sciences3
ENGL 110First Year Composition3
RELS 110The Nature and Experience of Religion3
MATH 230Elementary Statistics3
or MATH 151 Topics in Modern Mathematics
SOC 201Introduction to Sociology3
Elective 3
Second Year
Second Year - Fall
BIOL 207Anatomy and Physiology I4
KIN 102Intro to Exercise Science2
BIOL 209Anatomy And Physiology Lab I0
Second Year - Spring
KIN 217Motor Learning3
BIOL 208Anatomy and Physiology II4
BIOL 210Anatomy & Physiology II Lab0
Second Year - Fall or Spring
KIN 231Anaerobic Conditioning2
PSYC 203Introduction to Psychology3
SPCH 204Fundamentals of Speech3
RELS Elective (200 Level)3
ENGL Elective (Lit.)3
KIN Elective 2
Electives 6
Third Year
Third Year - Fall
KIN 306Physiology of Exercise **3
KIN 307Physiology of Exercise Lab0
BIOL 221Introductory Nutrition3
Third Year - Spring
KIN 309Anatomical Kinesiology **2
KIN 315Anatomical Kinesiology Lab0
KIN 412Organization and Administration of Kinesiology2
KIN 419Advanced Exercise Prescription2
BIOL 441Cardiovascular Biology3
Third Year - Fall or Spring
KIN 318Care & Prevention **2
KIN 430Stress Management3
KIN Elective2
Electives 9
Fourth Year
Fourth Year - Fall
KIN 303Sports Psychology3
or PSYC 421 Abnormal Psychology
KIN 418Biomechanics of Human Movement **2
KIN 421Therapeutic Recreation 15 hrs. fieldwork required2
KIN 445Therapeutic Prescriptions,Exercises and Modalities2
Fourth Year - Spring
KIN 411Principles and Philosophy of Kinesiology2
KIN 414Statistics in Exercise Science3
KIN 424Adapted Exercise & Sport3
KIN 443Basic Electrocardiography **2
Fourth Year - Fall or Spring
KIN 2091st Aid/Emergencies/CPR *1
KIN 428Professional Practicum I ***3
KIN Elective2
RELS Elective (300 Level)3
Total Credits129

Exercise Science majors must achieve a grade of “C” or better in all KIN courses.


Public Health Major Requirements

Health Care Services Administration Concentration - Curriculum/Courses

First Year
First Year - Fall
BIOL 131Principles of Biology I4
BIOL 133Principles of Biology Lab I0
ENGL 110First Year Composition3
MATH 151Topics in Modern Mathematics3
PSYC 203Introduction to Psychology3
RELS 110The Nature and Experience of Religion3
First Year - Spring
BIOL 134Principles of Biology Lab II0
BIOL 132Principles of Biology II4
CMPT 155Computer Applications for Life Sciences3
KIN 110Personal Wellness3
SOC 201Introduction to Sociology3
ENGL Elective 3
Second Year
Second Year - Fall
PHP 206Introduction to Public Health3
BIOL 207Anatomy and Physiology I4
BIOL 209Anatomy And Physiology Lab I0
BIOL 221Introductory Nutrition3
ECON 203Microeconomics3
MATH 230Elementary Statistics3
Second Year - Spring
PHP 205U.S. Health Care System3
BIOL 208Anatomy and Physiology II4
BIOL 210Anatomy & Physiology II Lab0
MGMT 201Introduction to Management3
SPCH 204Fundamentals of Speech3
RELS Elective 3
Third Year
Third Year - Fall
PHP 201Foundation of Health Education & Health Promotion3
PHP 318Essentials for Public Health Practice3
PHP 410Principles of Epidemiology3
PHP 412Health Research Methods3
PHP 420Ethics in Health Care3
Third Year - Spring
PHP 392Foundations of Public Health Policy3
PHP 427Disparities in Health3
KIN 430Stress Management3
SOC 204Urban Anthropology3
RHS 471Healthcare Organization and Management3
Fourth Year
Fourth Year - Fall
PHP 418Introduction to Environmental Health3
KIN 2091st Aid/Emergencies/CPR1
PSYC 374Organizational Psychology3
RELS 373Death as a Fact of Life3
Elective 3
Fourth Year - Spring
PHP 425Practicum in Public Health4
MGMT 320Talent Management & Acquisition3
RHS 481Legal Aspects in Health Care3
Elective3
Total Credits120

Community Health Concentration - Curriculum/Courses

First Year
First Year - Fall
PHP 206Introduction to Public Health3
ENGL 110First Year Composition3
BIOL 131Principles of Biology I4
BIOL 133Principles of Biology Lab I0
MATH 151Topics in Modern Mathematics3
RELS 110The Nature and Experience of Religion3
First Year - Spring
BIOL 132Principles of Biology II4
BIOL 134Principles of Biology Lab II0
ENGL Elective 3
CMPT 155Computer Applications for Life Sciences3
KIN 110Personal Wellness3
SOC 201Introduction to Sociology3
Second Year
Second Year - Fall
PHP 318Essentials for Public Health Practice3
BIOL 207Anatomy and Physiology I4
BIOL 209Anatomy And Physiology Lab I0
BIOL 221Introductory Nutrition3
MATH 230Elementary Statistics3
PSYC 203Introduction to Psychology3
Second Year - Spring
PHP 205U.S. Health Care System3
BIOL 208Anatomy and Physiology II4
BIOL 210Anatomy & Physiology II Lab0
KIN 304Kinesiology and Public Health3
SPCH 204Fundamentals of Speech3
RELS Elective 3
Third Year
Third Year - Fall
PHP 201Foundation of Health Education & Health Promotion3
PHP 302Health Communication Methods3
PHP 420Ethics in Health Care3
KIN 2091st Aid/Emergencies/CPR1
RHS 481Legal Aspects in Health Care3
Elective 3
Third Year - Spring
PHP 392Foundations of Public Health Policy3
PHP 410Principles of Epidemiology3
PHP 412Health Research Methods3
PHP 427Disparities in Health3
SOC 204Urban Anthropology3
Fourth Year
Fourth Year - Fall
PHP 418Introduction to Environmental Health3
PSYC 374Organizational Psychology3
RELS 373Death as a Fact of Life3
Elective 3
Fourth Year - Spring
PHP 416Introduction to Public Health Implementation and Evaluation3
PHP 425Practicum in Public Health4
KIN 430Stress Management3
Elective 3
Total Credits120

Public Health majors must achieve a grade of “C” or better in all PHP courses.

Kinesiology Courses

KIN 100. Intro Teaching Physical Ed. 2 Credits.

Orientation to the field of teaching quality physical education in diverse school settings. Introduction to numerous requirements for teacher certification within New York State and New York City. Exposure to professional organizations.

KIN 101. Team Sports I. 2 Credits.

Instruction in the fundamental skills, techniques, teaching methods, safety and coaching strategy of soccer, lacrosse, handball and floor hockey.

KIN 102. Intro to Exercise Science. 2 Credits.

This class will orient students to the field of Exercise Science. Exposure to professional organizations and various professional career options will be discussed. Field visitation is required.

KIN 103. Beginner Swimming. 1 Credit.

This course introduces the student to basic swimming skills and proper teaching techniques. Content includes pool safety, water exploration, primary skills, stroke readiness, and a games unit.

KIN 104. Intermediate Swimming. 1 Credit.

This course introduces the student to basic swimming skills and proper teaching techniques. Content includes pool safety, basic competencies in intermediate swimming, rescue techniques, and a games unit.

KIN 110. Personal Wellness. 3 Credits.

A study of the diversified nature of health and wellness as it relates to everyday living by examining vital health areas and issues relevant to the concerns of the student. Identification and reporting suspected child abuse and maltreatment; prevention of child abduction; preventing alcohol, tobacco and other drug abuse; safety education including fire and arson prevention and satisfaction of the S.A.V.E requirement are included in this course.

KIN 113. Team Sports II. 2 Credits.

Instruction in the fundamental skills, techniques, teaching methods, safety and coaching strategy of football, softball/baseball, volleyball, and basketball.

KIN 114. Small Crafts. 1 Credit.

Fundamental skills and techniques in canoeing, sailing and boating. Offered in camp. Fee for room and board.

KIN 116. Leisure Sports & Activities. 1 Credit.

Instruction in the fundamental techniques, teaching methods, and safety of leisure sports and activities. Fitness assessment administered.

KIN 120. Outdoor Adventures. 2 Credits.

Designed to offer both physical and mental challenges through participation in outdoor educational activities. Offered in camp. Fee for room and board.

KIN 209. 1st Aid/Emergencies/CPR. 1 Credit.

The course will cover knowledge in body systems, standard first aid for injuries, sudden illnesses, temperature emergencies, and emergency first aid for breathing and cardiac emergencies. Practice in emergency skills includes: first aid for choking, rescue breathing, CPR administration, and use of an AED.

KIN 213. Quality Physical Education for Elementary Schools. 3 Credits.

The course introduces the curriculum of movement concepts and skill themes to start children in the process of becoming physically active for a lifetime. The skill themes approach is strongly aligned with the goals and objectives outlined in the National Standards and New York State Standards for Physical Education.

KIN 217. Motor Learning. 3 Credits.

An examination of motor learning and performance, including neural mechanisms underlying motor behavior and application of problem solving strategies, to help individuals learn or relearn motor skills.

KIN 229. Rhythmic Activities & Gymnastics. 2 Credits.

KIN 229 is designed to introduce, develop, and examine gymnastic/tumbling and rhythmic fundamental movement skills and safety considerations. Emphasis is placed on guiding students to apply teaching methods of developing and designing gymnastics and rhythmic routines including a variety of skills that students can utilize as a lifelong activity.

KIN 231. Anaerobic Conditioning. 2 Credits.

A theoretical as well as practical investigation into training methodologies used to enhance the various aspects of anaerobic performance. Special attention will be given to the guidelines of the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA) with the hope that upon graduating, students will seek the Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) credential.

KIN 237. Hiking. 1 Credit.

The fundamentals of hiking and orienteering will be taught. The many trails of the Palisades Interstate Park will provide the laboratory experience. Class will meet on selected Saturdays and/or Sundays for a total of thirty hours.

KIN 245. Yoga. 2 Credits.

Orientation into the science of Yoga. Exposure to the practice of Yoga including principals of Asana, Pranayama techniques and Meditation. Integrating Yoga into daily life will be explored.

KIN 246. Aerobic Conditioning. 2 Credits.

Theory and practice of a variety of aerobic exercise modes.

KIN 303. Sports Psychology. 3 Credits.

An analysis of the psychological operative in sports.

KIN 304. Kinesiology and Public Health. 3 Credits.

An introduction to the methods, evidence, and interdisciplinary connections between kinesiology and the public health sciences.

KIN 305. Quality Physical Education for Secondary Schools. 3 Credits.

Components of a quality program are addressed and various curricular models are connected to the National/State Standards. The course focuses on teaching skills (e.g. content development, reflective teaching, assessment, etc.). Fieldwork required. Prerequisite: KIN 213.

KIN 306. Physiology of Exercise. 3 Credits.

The investigation of human physiological responses to exercise in relation to age, sex, physical fitness, and environmental conditions. Two lectures and two laboratory hours. Fall. Pre-requisites: BIOL 207 and BIOL 208. Co-requisite: KIN 307.

KIN 307. Physiology of Exercise Lab. 0 Credits.

Lab portion of KIN 306. Pre-requisites: BIOL 207 and BIOL 208 Co-requisite: KIN 306.

KIN 309. Anatomical Kinesiology. 2 Credits.

This course is designed to provide the student with basic scientific information and understanding of human motion within the areas of anatomy, neuromuscular physiology, and biomechanics, and to expose the student to diagnosis and prescribe proper instruction in sports medicine and physical education programs. Class consists of a 2 hour lecture combined with a 2 hour laboratory experience. Pre-requisite: BIOL 207 and 208. Co-requisite: KIN 315.

KIN 315. Anatomical Kinesiology Lab. 0 Credits.

This course is designed to provide the student with basic scientific information and understanding of human motion within the areas of anatomy, neuromuscular physiology, and biomechanics, and to expose the student to diagnosis and prescribe proper instruction in sports medicine and physical education programs. Two hour laboratory experience. Pre-requisite: BIOL 207 and BIOL 208. Co-requisite: KIN 309.

KIN 318. Care & Prevention. 2 Credits.

This class will discuss the basic principles of anatomy, physiology, kinesiology and psychology related to athletic performance and the role of the Athletic Trainer. The course will identify common athletic injuries while providing the student with the basic taping, care, and rehabilitation, to help assist in optimal athletic performance. Prerequisite BIO 207 & BIO 208. Non-Kinesiology Majors need Approval from Kinesiology Chairperson.

KIN 327. Rhythmic Activities. 2 Credits.

The analysis and performance of basic fundamental movement skills and rhythmic activities for creative and choreographed dance.

KIN 331. Contemporary Activities. 2 Credits.

Students will be able to demonstrate fundamental techniques and teaching methods applicable to various contemporary/non-traditional activities.

KIN 337. Track & Field & Country. 2 Credits.

Instruction in the fundamental skills, techniques, teaching methods, safety and coaching strategy of Track & Field.

KIN 350. Independent Study. 1 Credit.

Individual study and/or research under faculty supervision.

KIN 351. Independent Study. 2 Credits.

Individual study and/or research under faculty supervision.

KIN 352. Independent Study. 3 Credits.

Individual study and/or research under faculty supervision.

KIN 375. Special Topic. 3 Credits.

Topics of current interest to exercise science and physical education majors. Subject matter and prerequisite courses will be announced in advance of semester offering.

KIN 401. Lifeguard Training. 1 Credit.

The development of skills and knowledge for duties required of a lifeguard. American Red Cross Life Guarding Certification. Screening of water skills. Certification Fee.

KIN 405. Research Seminar. 2 Credits.

The development and writing of a research proposal related to wellness and human movement sciences.

KIN 411. Principles and Philosophy of Kinesiology. 2 Credits.

This course reviews the principles and philosophy of kinesiology including historical, philosophical, and sociological principles. Emphasis is placed on the application of these principles, along with current research and literature, to the physical education, athletic, and exercise science professions.

KIN 412. Organization and Administration of Kinesiology. 2 Credits.

Principles and policies for the organization, supervision, administration and human relations of the physical education, athletic, and exercise science professions.

KIN 414. Statistics in Exercise Science. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to provide a working knowledge of basic statistical methods, research design, and tests and measurement for the undergraduate exercise science student. Pre-requisite: BIOL 306 or KIN 306.

KIN 415. Supervised Practice Teaching in Secondary Schools. 3 Credits.

Observation and supervised practice teaching in the field of physical education in Secondary Schools.

KIN 416. Supervised Practiced Teaching in Elementary Schools. 3 Credits.

Observation and supervised practice teaching in the field of physical education in Elementary Schools.

KIN 418. Biomechanics of Human Movement. 2 Credits.

A survey of principles derived from the fields of physics, mechanics, and mathematics which influence the performance of motor skills.Pre-requisite: BIOL 309 or KIN 309.

KIN 419. Advanced Exercise Prescription. 2 Credits.

This course provides the theoretical background and practical skills necessary to prescribe therapeutic doses of exercise for persons with a wide range of abilities/disabilities. Pre-requisite: BIOL 306 or KIN 306.

KIN 421. Therapeutic Recreation. 2 Credits.

Foundations, principles, programming, current trends and issues in therapeutic recreational services. Field work required.

KIN 422. Curriculum & Assessment. 3 Credits.

Students will apply current methods of assessment to measure attainment of learning outcomes as defined by national/state learning standards for a physically educated person. The inextricable link between a standard-based curriculum, assessment, and effective instruction will be investigated throughout the semester. In addition, the common core standards for literacy will be explored and aligned to national/state physical education learning standards (emphasis on Academic Vocabulary/Language Function).Pre-requisite: KIN 213.

KIN 423. Adapted Physical Activity. 3 Credits.

Foundations of and current issues in adapted physical activity. Emphasizes assessment, planning, instructional strategies, and evaluation for physical activity for students with diverse skills and abilities. Field work required. Prerequisite: KIN 217.

KIN 424. Adapted Exercise & Sport. 3 Credits.

Analysis of conditions that impact participation in exercise and sport of individuals with disabilities. Principles, adapted equipment, programming, and organization of exercise and sport for individuals with disabilities. Field work required. Prerequisite: KIN 217.

KIN 428. Professional Practicum I. 3 Credits.

The purpose of this course is to present the student with a clinical experience in an Exercise Science profession under the supervision of qualified personnel which meets the standards of recognized accrediting agencies.

KIN 430. Stress Management. 3 Credits.

This course is an interdisciplinary approach to the study of human stress. It will investigate the causes of stress, physical, mental, emotional as well as methods of prevention/management.

KIN 443. Basic Electrocardiography. 2 Credits.

Provides background needed for administering clinical exercise tests and interpreting their results, with strict attention to the guidelines of the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM). Biology majors in the Pre-Physical Therapy studies may take this course for Biology credit. Pre-requisite: BIOL 306 or KIN 306.

KIN 445. Therapeutic Prescriptions,Exercises and Modalities. 2 Credits.

Understanding prescriptions for the rehabilitation of specific disorders through the use of exercise and modalities. Two lectures. Fall.

Public Health Courses

PHP 201. Foundation of Health Education & Health Promotion. 3 Credits.

This course introduces students to the basic principles, philosophies, and functional areas of health promotion and education. Describes prevalent educational and psychological theories of learning and behavior change used by health educators in a variety of work settings.

PHP 205. U.S. Health Care System. 3 Credits.

This course will provide students with a comprehensive overview of the US Health Care System from its inception to modern day. The significance of each type of care and the methods of delivery will be reviewed. The current state of reimbursement, long term care, and public health will be discussed. Students will examine the Affordable Care Act and its impact on the US Health Care system. Career opportunities will also be explored.

PHP 206. Introduction to Public Health. 3 Credits.

This course will present the student with an introduction to the multifaceted discipline of public health for the purpose of enhancing an understanding of the topic and providing a knowledge base for further studies. The definition of public health will be presented in the context of its history, system structure, and responsibilities in protecting human health in society. The social-ecological model of the interactions between physical/social environments with the individual biological/behavioral factors as determinants of population health will be emphasized/ The public health focus on disease prevention, measuring the health of populations, creating population-wide interventions, assessing outcomes, and informing policy will be discussed. Basic concepts in the five core public health knowledge areas of epidemiology, biostatistics, environmental health, social and behavioral sciences, and health policy and management will be introduced. Historical and contemporaneous examples and case studies will be used to demonstrate principles and issues. Students are expected to exhibit knowledge of the role and responsibilities of public health and demonstrate some facility in using basic public health methods in addressing population health issues.

PHP 302. Health Communication Methods. 3 Credits.

This course introduces students to health communication methods which encompass utilizing different communication techniques to reach varied audiences, applying social marketing, health advocacy, and tailored messaging. The impact of varied types of communications on the decision-making process in different segments of the population will be a focal point.

PHP 318. Essentials for Public Health Practice. 3 Credits.

This course introduces students to the fundamental functions of public health practice: assessment, policy development and assurance. Community-based needs assessment and common public health intervention strategies comprise the core content of this course. Students will explore the process of developing interventions with an emphasis on employing the technologies commonly used in public health practice.

PHP 392. Foundations of Public Health Policy. 3 Credits.

This course will introduce the nature of health policy and the process by which it is developed. Various approaches to health policy are defined and their rationale considered. The politics of the development of health policy in democratic societies are discussed from both national and international perspectives.

PHP 410. Principles of Epidemiology. 3 Credits.

This course provides an introduction to the discipline of epidemiology, its role in public health practice and decision-making. The course will address the distribution and determinants of disease/injury in population and will explore how epidemiologists make inferences about risk factors and etiology of disease/injury in populations.

PHP 412. Health Research Methods. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to focus on the principles of research relevant to the health fields and increase the awareness of the importance of disseminating information. Students will learn how to review literature and to apply research methodology to problems within their specific health fields. An introduction to quantitative, qualitative, mixed method and participatory approaches to research, as well as ethical issue in conducting research will be discussed. Students will build the skills necessary for conducting research and will be able to design a research project.

PHP 416. Introduction to Public Health Implementation and Evaluation. 3 Credits.

This course introduces students to public health program planning methods with an emphasis on planning health promotion/health education interventions. Strategies and techniques for community-based needs assessment are presented. Students will develop and use the skills needed to plan for the design, development, implementation, and evaluation of strategies to improve individual and community health.

PHP 418. Introduction to Environmental Health. 3 Credits.

This course provides an introduction to the discipline of epidemiology and its role in public health practice and decision-making. The course will address the distribution and determinants of disease/injury in populations and will explore how epidemiologists make inferences about risk factors and etiology of disease/injury in populations.

PHP 420. Ethics in Health Care. 3 Credits.

This course will explore the major ethical issues confronting the practices of medicine and biomedical science. The class will become familiar with legal and institutional positions, study ethical issues related to the access of healthcare, quality of care, ethical dilemmas of beginning of life issues including surrogacy and abortion, bioethical considerations of aging and dying, physician assisted suicide, assisted dying, current practices in organ transplantation, regenerative medicine, stem cell research, the Patient Protection Affordable Care Act (PPACA) and new and emerging bioethics issues in societal health including domestic violence and end of life care.

PHP 425. Practicum in Public Health. 4 Credits.

One hundred and twenty hours of supervised field work in a professional setting and a written paper on the experience.

PHP 427. Disparities in Health. 3 Credits.

This course will explore the health disparities that exist among and between groups of people based on the categories of race, ethnicity, gender and class. Situated within the historical record of public health in the United States, this course will review the social, political, cultural, legal and ethical factors that influence health disparities. Significant attention will be given to the idea that health and access to health care is a basic human right in a just society.