pause world-wide-web instagram volume-medium linkedin flickr basketball devices home pencil person-money rss slider-left-arrow slider-right-arrow slider-left-arrow slider-right-arrow star video-transcript close hamburger minus plus account arrow certificate city globe graduation-cap graph handshake info info-2 map play search snapchat twitter facebook file-text-o youtube tumblr camera file-text

Physics

Dr. Rostislav Konoplich
Chair of the Department

Dr. Sezar Fesjian
Assistant Chair of the Department

Physics is a study of natural phenomena from a subatomic scale to an enormous scale of the entire universe. Physics is the most basic and fundamental science which provides the basis for deep understanding in many fields of study and all of technology.

The Physics Department offers BS and BA degrees in Physics, and a Minor in Physics. Small class sizes and close collaboration between students and faculty create comfortable learning and research environments. Students in the Physics Department collaborate with faculty on a variety of topics from the early universe cosmology and neutron star astrophysics to particle physics, optics and condensed matter. Our students publish articles in leading research journals and make presentations at national and international conferences. With support from the Physics Department and Manhattan College they participate in research during the academic year and take part in summer internships, in particular at Manhattan College, Brookhaven National Laboratory (USA) and CERN (Switzerland). Our alumni have successful careers in science, data science, teaching, engineering, medicine, finance and other fields.   

Lower Division Requirements

All physics majors must take the following courses in their freshman and sophomore years:

PHYS 101
PHYS 191
Physics I
and Physics I Lab
4
PHYS 102
PHYS 192
Physics II
and Physics II Lab
4
PHYS 209Mathematical Methods in Physics3
PHYS 233Physics III3
PHYS 234Physics IV3
PHYS 261Intermediate Laboratory I1
PHYS 262Intermediate Laboratory II1
SCI 100Science Orientation Seminar1
SCI 101Science Orientation Seminar II1
CMPT 101Computer Science I3
MATH 185Calculus I3
or MATH 187 Honors Calculus I
or MATH 155 Calculus for the Life Sciences I
MATH 186Calculus II3
or MATH 188 Honors Calculus II
or MATH 156 Calculus for the Life Sciences II
MATH 285Calculus III3
or MATH 287 Honors Calculus III
MATH 286Differential Equations3
CHEM 101
CHEM 103
General Chemistry I
and General Chemistry Laboratory I
4
CHEM 102
CHEM 104
General Chemistry II
and General Chemistry Laboratory II
4

Students selected for the honors sequence will be enrolled in the honors sections of Physics I and II (PHYS 101H and PHYS 102H).

Upper Division Requirements for the B.S. Major in Physics

This B.S. Physics major program is standard preparation for those students interested in graduate studies in physics.

PHYS 301Computational Physics3
PHYS 309Mechanics I3
PHYS 311Atomic & Nuclear Physics3
PHYS 312Quantum Mechanics I3
PHYS 314Electromagnetic Waves3
PHYS 341Topics in Astrophysics3
PHYS 350Optics3
PHYS 352Modern Physics Lab II2
PHYS 410Advanced Theoretical Physics3
PHYS 415Statistical Mechanics3
PHYS 440Research Project in Physics3
PHYS 443Quantum Mechanics II3
PHYS 445Research Project in Physics2
PHYS 446Topics in Cosmology3
PHYS 450Seminar1

Upper Division Requirements for the B.A. Major in Physics

The B.A. Physics major program is useful to those interested in careers in such fields as education, technical writing, and patent law.  It also provides a full foundation for graduate studies in physics.

PHYS 301Computational Physics3
PHYS 309Mechanics I3
PHYS 311Atomic & Nuclear Physics3
PHYS 314Electromagnetic Waves3
PHYS 350Optics3
PHYS 352Modern Physics Lab II2
PHYS 441Senior Thesis3
PHYS 446Topics in Cosmology3

Grade Requirements

For graduation a physics major must have a 2.00 cumulative index in all required physics courses and the elective science and engineering courses. A minimum grade of C is required in all major courses.

The Concentration in Theoretical Physics

The concentration in Theoretical Physics offers students the opportunity to acquire a deep conceptual understanding of fundamental physics and provides a foundation for professional work not only in physics and related fields but also in such fields as astrophysics, biophysics, engineering and applied physics, geophysics, mathematical physics, computer science, finance, or medicine. This concentration includes the following courses:  Quantum Mechanics I (PHYS 312), Quantum Mechanics II (PHYS 443) and Advanced Theoretical Physics (PHYS 410).

Minor in Physics

The minor in Physics consists of a minimum of 15 credits.  Specific requirements are listed below.  A grade of at least C is required for all courses meeting the requirements for a minor in Physics.

The following courses may be used toward the Physics minor:   PHYS 101, 191, 102, 192, 209, 233, 234, 261, 262, 301, 309, 311, 312, 314, 341, 350, 352, 410, 415, 440, 443, 445, 446, and 450. 

Application:  To pursue the minor in Physics, a student must get a Minor Form from the Physics department, fill it out, and have it approved by the Physics Department.  An approved form will be forwarded to the appropriate dean. 

Minor Requirements
The minor in Physics consists of a minimum of 15 credits including PHYS 101+191 and PHYS 102+192.  The remaining courses should be chosen from physics courses that are on the above list of courses with the approval of the Chair of the Department. 

PLANS OF STUDY

Bachelor of Science in Physics

First Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
PHYS 101
PHYS 191
4PHYS 102
PHYS 192
4
MATH 185, 187, or 1553MATH 186, 188, or 1563
RELS 1103CMPT 1013
SCI 1001ENGL 1103
MLL3SCI 1011
 MLL3
 14 17
Second Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
PHYS 2333PHYS 2093
PHYS 2611PHYS 2343
MATH 285 or 2873PHYS 2621
CHEM 101
CHEM 103
4MATH 2863
LLRN 102 or PHIL 2133CHEM 102
CHEM 104
4
 Electives3
 14 17
Third Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
PHYS 3013PHYS 3123
PHYS 3093PHYS 3143
PHYS 3113PHYS 3413
PHYS 3503PHYS 3522
ENGL 1503PHIL 1503
MUSC 150 or ART 1503RELS Catholic Studies3
 18 17
Fourth Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
PHYS 4403PHYS 4103
PHYS 4433PHYS 4153
PHYS 4463PHYS 4452
RELS Global/Contemporary3PHYS 4501
Social Sciences3HIST 1503
 Social Sciences3
 15 15
Total Credits: 127

Bachelor of Arts in Physics

First Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
PHYS 101
PHYS 191
4PHYS 102
PHYS 192
4
MATH 185, 187, or 1553MATH 186, 188, or 1563
RELS 1103CMPT 1013
SCI 1001ENGL 1103
MLL3SCI 1011
 MLL3
 14 17
Second Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
PHYS 2333PHYS 2093
PHYS 2611PHYS 2343
MATH 285 or 2873PHYS 2621
CHEM 101
CHEM 103
4MATH 2863
LLRN 102 or PHIL 2133CHEM 102
CHEM 104
4
 Electives3
 14 17
Third Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
PHYS 3013PHYS 3143
PHYS 3093PHYS 3522
PHYS 3113PHIL 1503
PHYS 3503RELS Catholic Studies3
ENGL 1503Electives3
MUSC 150 or ART 1503 
 18 14
Fourth Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
RELS Global/Contemporary3PHYS 4413
Social Sciences3HIST 1503
PHYS 4463Social Sciences3
Electives6Electives6
 15 15
Total Credits: 124

Courses

PHYS 101. Physics I. 3 Credits.

A calculus approach to the basic concepts of mechanics. Three lecture hours. Must also register for PHYS 191 lab. Prerequisite or Corequisite: MATH 155 or MATH 185, or MATH 187.

PHYS 102. Physics II. 3 Credits.

A calculus approach to the basic concepts of electricity and magnetism. Three lecture hours. Must also register for PHYS 192 lab. Prerequisite or corequisite PHYS 101 and MATH 156, or MATH 186, or MATH 188.

PHYS 105. Principles of Physics I. 4 Credits.

An introduction to the basic principles and concepts of Physics including mechanics, oscillations and waves. Three lecture hours.

PHYS 106. Principles of Physics II. 4 Credits.

An introduction to the basic principles and concepts of physics including, electricity and magnetism, optics and modern physics. Three lecture hours. Prerequisite: PHYS 105 or equivalent.

PHYS 107. Introduction to Physics I. 4 Credits.

An algebra based approach to the basic concepts of mechanics, oscillations and waves, fluid statics and dynamics with biological applications. Three lecture hours.

PHYS 108. Introduction to Physics II. 4 Credits.

An algebra based approach to the basic concepts of electricity and magnetism, electromagnetic waves, optics and elementary modern physics with biological applications. Three lecture hours. Prerequisite: PHYS 107 or equivalent.

PHYS 151. Introduction to Physics Research. Credits.

Elementary Research projects for beginning students in physics. Students learn how to pursue an open ended question under the guidance of a faculty advisor. Permission of department chair required.

PHYS 152. Introduction Physics Research II. Credits.

Elementary Research projects for beginning students in physics. Students learn how to pursue an open ended question under the guidance of a faculty advisor. Permission of department chair required.

PHYS 191. Physics I Lab. 1 Credit.

Physics I Laboratory. Three lab hours, Co-requisite: PHYS 101.

PHYS 192. Physics II Lab. 1 Credit.

Physics II Laboratory. Three lab hours. Co-requisite: PHYS 102.

PHYS 195. Principles of Physics I Lab. 0 Credits.

Principles of Physics I Laboratory. Three lab hours. Co-requisite: PHYS 105.

PHYS 196. Principles of Physics II Lab. 0 Credits.

Principles of Physics II Laboratory. Three lab hours. Co-requisite: PHYS 106.

PHYS 197. Introduction to Physics I Lab. 0 Credits.

Introduction to Physics I Laboratory. Three lab hours. Co-requisite: PHYS 107.

PHYS 198. Introduction to Physics II Lab. 0 Credits.

Introduction to Physics II Laboratory. Three lab hours. Co-requisite: PHYS 108.

PHYS 201. Wave Theory of Light and Matter. 3 Credits.

Intermediate level introduction to electromagnetic waves and the theory of light, geometrical and physical optics, introduction to quantum concepts and the wave nature of matter with applications to the solid state.

PHYS 209. Mathematical Methods in Physics. 3 Credits.

Complex algebra and analysis, vector analysis, matrices and eigenvalue problems. Fourier series and introduction to linear spaces. Introduction to partial differential equations as applied to physics. Three lecture hours. Prerequisites: C or better in PHYS 102 and MATH 285 or MATH 287.

PHYS 214. Electricity and Magnetism. 3 Credits.

Electrostatics, Magnetostatics, Faraday's Law, Maxwell's equations using vector analysis. Spring. Pre-requisite: C or better in PHYS 102; MATH 285.

PHYS 221. Physics of Digital Systems. 4 Credits.

The basic physics and selected circuit applications of solid state devices such as the diode, transistor and op-amp as used in digital systems. The lectures will concentrate on the development of band theory and the diode equation from first principles while the lab will concentrate on digital circuit application using TTL and analog IC'S. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory. Prerequisites: PHYS 101, PHYS 102 sequence.

PHYS 233. Physics III. 3 Credits.

Introduction to oscillations, mechanical waves, fluid dynamics, and thermodynamics. Three lecture hours. Pre-requisite: C or better in PHYS 102.

PHYS 234. Physics IV. 3 Credits.

Gravitation, electromagnetic waves, optics, introduction to modern physics, and solid state physics. Three lecture hours. Pre-requisite: C or better in PHYS 102.

PHYS 261. Intermediate Laboratory I. 1 Credit.

Experiments in mechanical waves, fluids, and thermodynamics. Three lab hours.

PHYS 262. Intermediate Laboratory II. 1 Credit.

Experiments in electricity and magnetism, optics, and introductory modern physics. Three Lab hours.

PHYS 301. Computational Physics. 3 Credits.

An introduction to computational physics. Monte Carlo techniques. Numerical differentiation and integration. Searching, fitting and data analysis. Differential equations. Three lecture hours. Pre-requisites: C or better in PHYS 102 and MATH 285 or MATH 287.

PHYS 309. Mechanics I. 3 Credits.

Dynamics of particles and systems; Gravitation; Rotating Coordinates; Motion of rigid bodies, Lagrangian formulation. Coupled oscillators. Three lectures. Pre-requisite: C or better in PHYS 209 or with permission of department chair.

PHYS 311. Atomic & Nuclear Physics. 3 Credits.

Schroedinger wave theory for atomic structure. Magnetic field effects on atoms. Atomic and molecular spectra. Introductory nuclear physics. Three lectures. Pre-requisite: C or better in PHYS 209 or with permission of department chair.

PHYS 312. Quantum Mechanics I. 3 Credits.

Introduction to Quantum theory. One dimensional quantum systems. The harmonic oscillator. Central Potentials. Pre-requisite: C or better in PHYS 209 or with permission of department chair.

PHYS 314. Electromagnetic Waves. 3 Credits.

Electro-magnetic waves and their interaction with matter. Maxwell's Equations in free space and dielectric media. Pre-requisite: C or better in PHYS 209 or with permission of department chair.

PHYS 323. Astronomy. 3 Credits.

An intermediate level overview of the solar system and the physical properties of stars, stellar evolution, galaxies and the universe at large. Pre-requisite: PHYS 101 and PHYS 102.

PHYS 341. Topics in Astrophysics. 3 Credits.

Topics of current interest in astrophysics, including stellar structure and atmospheres, evolution and remnants, formation of stars and planetary systems, galactic structure and evolution of galaxies. Prerequisite: C or better in PHYS 209.

PHYS 342. Topics: in Astrophysics. 3 Credits.

Topics of current interest in astrophysics, including stellar structure and atmospheres, evolution and remnants, formation of stars and planetary systems, galactic structure and evolution of galaxies. Prerequisite: C or better in PHYS 209.

PHYS 350. Optics. 3 Credits.

Wave optics, light and matter, interference, diffraction, polarization, and advanced topics in Optics. Three lecture hours. Pre-requisites: C or better in PHYS 102 and MATH 285 or MATH 287.

PHYS 351. Modern Physics Laboratory I. 2 Credits.

Experimental verification of properties of atomic structure. One three-hour period.

PHYS 352. Modern Physics Lab II. 2 Credits.

Advanced experiments in atomic and nuclear physics. Properties of radioactivity. One four-hour period.

PHYS 375. Internship for Juniors. 3 Credits.

Students participate in an off-campus training experience closely related to one of the areas of physics. Frequent meetings with the advisor plus a paper are required. Prerequisites: Junior status, 3.0 GPA, and permission of the student's advisor or Chair.

PHYS 410. Advanced Theoretical Physics. 3 Credits.

Vector and tensor analysis, complex variables, integral transform and Green's function methods in theoretical physics, special functions and partial differential equations, group theory in quantum mechanics. Three lecture hours.

PHYS 414. Electromagnetic Radiation II. 3 Credits.

Dielectric and Magnetic materials, electromagnetic waves in free space and media. Dipole radiation.

PHYS 415. Statistical Mechanics. 3 Credits.

Statistical mechanics of many body systems in equilibrium. Thermal behavior and phase transitions in condensed matter. Boltzmann's equation and non-equilibrium phenomena.

PHYS 432. Solid State Physics. 3 Credits.

Lattices and crystal binding. Phonons and lattice vibrations. Thermal properties of insulators. Metals, free electron gas, energy bands. Semiconductors, mobility, life times, p-n junctions. Superconductivity, B.C.S. theory. Phase transitions Magnetorthermal properties. Three lectures.

PHYS 434. Research Problems in Physics. 2 Credits.

PHYS 435. Research Problems in Physics. 2 Credits.

PHYS 440. Research Project in Physics. 3 Credits.

Introductory level student research projects in either experimental or theoretical physics carried out under the guidance of a faculty member.

PHYS 441. Senior Thesis. 3 Credits.

An independent study program in experimental or theoretical physics to provide an opportunity for the scientific development of advanced undergraduate physics majors. Minimum of six hours a week devoted to an organized study program is required. Permission of department chair necessary.

PHYS 442. Senior Thesis. 3 Credits.

An independent study program in experimental or theoretical physics to provide an opportunity for the scientific development of advanced undergraduate physics majors. Minimum of six hours a week devoted to an organized study program is required. Permission of department chair necessary.

PHYS 443. Quantum Mechanics II. 3 Credits.

Development of the formal structure of quantum mechanics. Time independent perturbation theory. Theory of scattering. Second quantization. Pre-requisite: C or better in PHYS 312.

PHYS 445. Research Project in Physics. 2 Credits.

Introductory level student research projects in either experimental or theoretical physics carried out under the guidance of a faculty member.

PHYS 446. Topics in Cosmology. 3 Credits.

Topics of current interest in cosmology, including cosmic distance ladder, geometry of the expanding universe, thermal history and cosmic microwave background, inflation and the primordial era. Prerequisite: C or better in PHYS 209 or with permission of department chair.

PHYS 450. Seminar. 1 Credit.

Single and sequential lectures on special topics in physics. Track I majors are required to present a research paper on either a theoretical or experimental topic in the spring semester of the senior year.

PHYS 475. Internship for Seniors. 3 Credits.

Students participate in an off-campus training experience closely related to their area of physics. Frequent meetings with the advisor plus a paper are required. Prerequisites: Senior status, 3.0 GPA, and permission of the student's advisor or the Chair.