pause world-wide-web instagram volume-medium linkedin flickr basketball devices home pencil person-money rss slider-left-arrow slider-right-arrow slider-left-arrow slider-right-arrow star video-transcript close hamburger minus plus account arrow certificate city globe graduation-cap graph handshake info info-2 map play search snapchat twitter facebook file-text-o youtube tumblr camera file-text

Civil & Environmental Engineering

Dr. Anirban De
Chair, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Vision Statement

The Civil and Environmental Engineering Department will be nationally recognized for producing leaders in the fields of civil and environmental engineering.

The Civil and Environmental Engineering Department will continue to develop and enrich the educational experience of its students.  This is accomplished by providing specialized courses in a variety of sub-disciplines such as structural, environmental, geotechnical, transportation, and water resources engineering. This objective is also accomplished through the Master’s degree programs in civil engineering, construction management, and environmental engineering and the strong research programs at both the undergraduate and graduate levels which provide unique opportunity for enrichment of student experience. Students pursuing a master’s degree in environmental may choose between an M.E. and an M.S. degree

Program Educational Objectives

Graduates of the undergraduate Civil Engineering program will be recognized for their:

  • Technical skills in civil & environmental engineering
  • Ethical practices and moral character
  • Leadership, achievement, and involvement in engineering and engineering-related professions
  • Dedication to furthering the engineering profession through continuous self-improvement
  • Commitment to engineering as a service-to-humanity profession through practicing sustainable engineering for New York and the world.

Student Outcomes

The Civil Engineering program uses the standard set of ABET, Inc., Student Outcomes (1) through (7) as described above under Engineering.

Civil Engineering Program

Mission Statement

The mission of the undergraduate Civil Engineering program is to develop an educational plan for each of our students so upon graduation they are prepared to continue their graduate studies or enter into the civil engineering profession.

The goal is to prepare students to function professionally as responsible members of the global engineering community dedicated to life-long learning and collaborative practice, discovery and sharing a breadth of knowledge. The program puts particular emphasis on introducing the students to the broad range of civil engineering disciplines.

Civil engineers use mathematics , along with the basic sciences and engineering sciences, in the study of the structural, geotechnical, transportation, environmental, and water resources engineering disciplines. These disciplines allow a civil engineer, working to improve the environment, to plan, design and construct the industrial plants of the world, the great public works, the housing, the bases for space exploration and the transportation networks.

Structural engineering deals with the analysis, design and construction of buildings, bridges, ships, aircraft, and other structures. Environmental engineering allows a civil engineer to analyze and model the environment, assess the effects of human activities on it, and design control facilities to ensure improvement and protection of environmental resources. Geotechnical engineering focuses on soil behavior and the subsequent design of adequate supports for all structures resting on the earth. Transportation engineering emphasizes the planning, design, and construction of efficient transportation infrastructure such as highways, airports, railways, seaports, and public transport. Water resources engineering focuses on water usage and distribution across networks as well as the design and construction of infrastructure that control bodies of water, such as rivers, lakes, reservoirs, and oceans. 

Students obtain strong technical knowledge by taking at least two required courses in each of the above disciplines. Students also choose from a wide range of elective courses, where they can concentrate on specific topics in their areas of interest. 

All undergraduate students in the department pursue a four-year degree in civil engineering.  The program also accommodates students who wish to pursue a minor in environmental engineering, in addition to their civil engineering major.

Four-Year Program in Civil Engineering

The curriculum for the first year is common for all the majors in engineering.  Students take the foundational courses in the sophomore year.  The junior and senior years allow for concentrated studies in the areas of structural, environmental, geotechnical, transportation, and water resources engineering.  A representative program is shown below.

First Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
MATH 18513MATH 18613
CHEM 101/103 or PHYS 101/19114CHEM 101/103 or PHYS 101/1914
ENGS 1153ENGS 1163
ENGL 110 or RELS 1103General Education Elective3
General Education Elective3ENGL 110 or RELS 1103
 16 16
Second Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
MATH 28513MATH 28613
CHEM 102/CHEM10414PHYS 102/PHYS 19214
 ENGS 2301-53
ENGS 20413CIVL 2011
ENGS 2061-53or CIVL 20213
CIVL 201 1 Approved Science Elective23
or CIVL 2021 3 
Approved Science Elective2- 
 16 16
Third Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
CEEN 3031-43CEEN 30713
CEEN 3041CEEN 3083
CEEN 3053CIVL 30913
CIVL 3021-43CIVL 3101-43
CIVL 30513CIVL 3111
CIVL 3063CIVL 31213
 16 16
Fourth Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
CIVL 406 or ENVL 40663CIVL 411 or ENVL 408 3
CIVL 410 or ENVG 50763CIVL 4123
CIVL 4096,73CIVL/ENVL Elective3
CIVL/ENVL Elective3CIVL/ENVL Elective3
General Education Elective43General Education Elective43
RELS Catholic Studies or RELS Contemporary/Global Studies3RELS Catholic Studies or RELS Contemporary/Global Studies3
 18 18
Total Credits: 132

Environmental Engineering Minor within Civil Engineering

An environmental engineering minor is available for students within the Civil & Environmental Engineering Department.  All Civil Engineering students follow the same curriculum for the first three years. For those pursuing a minor in Environmental Engineering, the following sequence is recommended for the fourth year. The required classes are the capstone design sequence (ENVL 406/ENVL 408) in Water Treatment /Environmental Engineering Design and either Geoenvironmenal Engineering (CIVG 501) or Groundwater (ENVG 507).  In addition, there are three environmental engineering electives.

Senior
FallCreditsSpringCredits
ENVL 4063ENVL 408 (Environmental Engineering Design)3
CIVG 501 or ENVG 5073CIVL 412 (Highway Design)3
CIVL 409 (Reinforced Concrete)73Environmental Elective*3
Environmental Elective* 3Environmental Elective*3
RELS Elective3RELS Elective3
General Education Elective3General Education Elective3
 18 18
Total Credits: 36

*Environmental electives are selected in consultation with the Environmental Engineering Graduate Program Director in the Civil & Environmental Engineering Department.  Students who wish to enroll in the EAC of ABET accredited M.E. program (see below) must take one science course (currently, either Biology or Earth Science) as one of their Environmental Electives.  

Completion of the Environmental Engineering Minor allows students entry into the EAC of ABET Accredited Masters of Engineering (M.E.) Graduate Program provided they have a cumulative G.P.A. of 3.0.

In addition, there are numerous opportunities for partial or full financial support for graduate studies including:

  • Graduate Internships
  • Graduate Fellowships
  • Graduate Research Assistantships (GRAs)
  • Graduate Laboratory Assistants (GLAs)

Fundamentals of Engineering Examination-- Civil & Environmental Engineering Department

All students must take the Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) examination in their fourth year as a requirement to graduate from the program. While students are not required to pass the FE exam, they are required to take the FE exam and document that they have completed the requirement.

Civil Engineering Courses

CIVL 201. Introduction to Civil Engineering. 3 Credits.

Basic components of buildings, and how they are constructed; Topics of soils, excavation, foundations and building loads and materials (steel and concrete); Building design and construction process; How to conduct surveys, read and create maps and drawings in plan and cross-sectional views to scale; Introduction to basic concepts of sustainability and energy efficient green building design; Basic elements of engineering economics. Three hours. Must earn no grade lower than a C. Prerequisite: MATH 185.

CIVL 202. Transportation. 3 Credits.

Principles of transportation and traffic engineering; an introduction to highway design including roadway alignment, stopping sight distance, and horizontal and vertical curves; traffic flow theory and quantification of highway level of service; an examination of multi-modal transportation systems in the context of social, economic, and political considerations; and practical issues regarding data collection, analysis, and evaluation. Fall. Three credits. Must earn no grade lower than a C. Prerequisite: MATH 185.

CIVL 302. Structural Analysis I. 3 Credits.

Analysis of determinate structures (beams, frames, and planar trusses): Loads and reactions, internal resisting forces (axial force, shear force, and bending moment), static equilibrium and superposition, free-body diagrams, shear force and bending moment diagrams, deflections. Three hours. Fall. Must earn no grade lower than a C. Prerequisite: ENGS 230, CIVL 201, PHYS 102.

CIVL 305. Computer Solutions of Civil Engineering Problems. 3 Credits.

Matrix algebra, eigenvalue problems, nonlinear equations, simultaneous linear algebraic equations, numerical integration, initial value and boundary value problems in ordinary differential equations. Three lectures. Fall. Must earn no grade lower than a C. Prerequisites: MATH 286, ENGS 230 with a grade of C or better.

CIVL 306. Civil Engineering Materials. 3 Credits.

Study of ferrous and nonferrous metals; physical properties in relation to the phase diagram. Consideration is given to plastics and other materials. The relationship of aggregates and other constituents of concrete and related conditions to the strength and related properties of concrete. Study of physical properties of wood. Study of asphalt properties and application to pavements. One-hour lecture and one two-hour laboratory. Prerequisite: ENGS 230.

CIVL 309. Steel Design. 3 Credits.

Design of steel structures subjected to various loads, such as dead, live, snow, wind, and earthquake forces. Design of tension members, beams, columns, and connections according to the AISC Specifications. Design project. Use of AISC Steel Construction Manuals. Spring. Three lectures. Must earn no grade lower than a C. Prerequisite: CIVL 302.

CIVL 310. Introductory Geomechanics. 3 Credits.

Origins of soil and rock; physical properties of soils and phase relationships; geostatic stresses and effective stress principles; seepage and flownet; one-dimensional compression and consolidation; shear strength of cohesive and cohesionless soils. Three lectures. Spring. Must earn no grade lower than a C. Prerequisites: ENGS 230, CEEN 303. Corequisite: CIVL 311.

CIVL 311. Soil Mechanics Laboratory. 1 Credit.

Soil description and classification systems; site characterization; index property tests for water content, particle-size distribution, and plasticity characteristics; engineering parameter tests for compaction characteristics, permeability, one-dimensional consolidation, and shear strength. One credit. Three-hour laboratory. Spring. Corequisite: CIVL 310.

CIVL 312. Structural Analysis II. 3 Credits.

Analysis of statically indeterminate structures considering loadings, support movements and thermal effects. Mathematical modeling, virtual work, flexibility method, stiffness method, slope deflection, and moment distribution. Analysis and modeling of structures using general purpose finite element, and structural computer programs. Three lectures. Spring. Must earn no grade lower than a C. Prerequisites: CIVL 302, CIVL 305.

CIVL 398. Introduction to Professional Development: Seminar 1. 1 Credit.

A series of lectures and field trips designed to expose students to different facets of the Civil and Environmental Engineering profession. Material will cover current trends in the professional and research fields within the discipline, as well as closely associated disciplines. Students will write papers based on material covered. All three courses will be offered each semester. Students will be required to take all three courses in order to graduate. These courses are only open to Junior and Senior students in the Civil & Environmental Engineering undergraduate program. The cumulative credits in the three courses will count as a technical elective.

CIVL 399. Introduction to Professional Development: Seminar 2. 1 Credit.

A series of lectures and field trips designed to expose students to different facets of the Civil and Environmental Engineering profession. Material will cover current trends in the professional and research fields within the discipline, as well as closely associated disciplines. Students will write papers based on material covered. All three courses will be offered each semester. Students will be required to take all three courses in order to graduate. These courses are only open to Junior and Senior students in the Civil & Environmental Engineering undergraduate program. The cumulative credits in the three courses will count as a technical elective.

CIVL 403. Civil Engineering Economy and Law. 3 Credits.

Economical conditions and law requirements impact on Civil Engineering projects. Time value of money, equivalency, present worth, future worth, depreciation, economic comparisons; Law: contracts, torts and malpractice, patents and copyrights, business associations, commercial law, real estate law, environmental law. Three lectures.

CIVL 404. Geology. 3 Credits.

The origin, nature, and distribution of materials that comprise the Earth; dynamic internal and surface natural processes, with particular attention to their effect on engineered construction. One or more field trips outside the regular class schedule. Three lectures. Prerequisite: Senior Status*.

CIVL 405. Rock Mechanics. 3 Credits.

This course provides the students and civil engineers with a working knowledge of rock mass and processes relevant to exploration, design, construction and performance of large civil and tunnel structures. The course will cover origin and types of rock, rock mass classifications, rock properties, civil engineering projects, fluid flow through jointed rock mass and slope stability.

CIVL 406. Structural Analysis III. 3 Credits.

General introduction to vibration and dynamics of structures. Analysis of multistory and complex frames, bridges and other structures due to wind and seismic loading. Influence lines for statically indeterminate structures. Cables and space frames. Analysis of structures using state-of-the-art structural computer programs. Two lectures, one two-period program session and two hours professional development outside the classroom. Fall. Must earn no grade lower than a C. Prerequisites: CIVL 309, CIVL 312.

CIVL 407. Groundwater Resources. 3 Credits.

Legislation and legal considerations. Evaluation of groundwater resources and associated geology and hydrology. Derivation of governing transport equations. Groundwater quality. Analysis of well problems. Systems approach to problems. Study of pollution problems and geothermal energy. Three lectures. Prerequisite: CEEN 303.

CIVL 409. Reinforced Concrete Design. 3 Credits.

Design of reinforced concrete structures. Design of structural members, such as beams, columns, slabs and foundations. Ultimate strength and serviceability requirements, latest ACI Code. Theoretical, practical, and economic considerations. Design projects. Three credits. Two two-period lectures. Fall. Must earn no grade lower than a C. Prerequisite: CIVL 309, CIVL 312.

CIVL 410. Introduction to Geotechnical Applications. 3 Credits.

Application of geomechanics principles to analyzing and designing foundations and slopes. Topics covered in detail include: shallow and deep foundations; unsupported-slope stability; lateral earth pressure theory and its application to basement, rigid, and flexible retaining walls; overview of ground improvement methods and technologies; overviews of construction and constructability. Three credits. Two two-period lectures. Must earn no grade lower than a C. Prerequisites: CIVL 309, CIVL 310.

CIVL 411. Capstone Structural Design. 3 Credits.

This course provides the students with a culminating design experience in which they will use the skills and knowledge gained throughout the curriculum to work as a team on a real design project. Three credits. Two two-period lectures and design; two hours professional development outside the classroom. Must earn no grade lower than a C. Prerequisites: CIVL 309, CIVL 406 CIVL 409. Corequisite: CIVL 410.

CIVL 412. Highway Design. 3 Credits.

Design standards and geometrics of highways; traffic volume and flow related to geometrics; earthwork estimations and economic analysis of highway alternates; basic pavement and roadside drainage design; planning, locating, and designing a highway segment. Three lectures. Spring. Prerequisite: CIVL 202 and Senior Status or Permission of Chair.

CIVL 413. Hydraulics. 3 Credits.

Looping pipe systems, three-reservoir problem; open channel flow, non-rectangular channels, critical flow at bridge piers and humps, backwater calculations, surface curves; unsteady flow, discharge under varying head, unsteady flow equation, water hammer, surge tanks; introduction to coastal hydraulics; hydrology, stream flow system analysis. Three lectures. Spring Prerequisite: CEEN 303, CEEN 307 with a minimum of C grade.

CIVL 415. Civil Engineering Projects. 3 Credits.

Individual student research or design projects, utilizing computer methods, experimentation and literature surveys. Proposal and report required. Under the sponsorship of a civil engineering faculty member; must be approved in writing by the Chairperson; for students of superior ability. Prerequisite: Senior Status*.

CIVL 416. Fe Prep. 0 Credits.

CIVL 417. Civil Engineering Practice. 3 Credits.

This course presents non-engineering skills needed to prepare students for professional careers in engineering. Through classroom lectures, workshops, collaborative projects and professional presentations from guest speakers, students will learn how the following are essential to an engineers full professional life: Public vs. Private Sector employment opportunities:Diversity;Ethics;Legal and Financial Matters; Public Involvement;Social Media; Client Relations; The Competitive Process; Program Management;Project Management;and Leadership.

CIVL 418. Trans Eng Capstone Design. 3 Credits.

This course is the capstone design course in transportation engineering. It is a project based course focusing on the design of roadways, highways and bridges according to the AASHTO, ITE Best Practices, and other state guidelines and codes. The students will work in groups and are responsible of submitting several written reports and participate in a technical oral presentation. In addition, the course will focus on Highway Funding; Travel Forecasting; Ethical Practice; Design Standards and Geometrics; Interchanges and Intersections; Parking; Traffic Control Devices; Highway Maintenance; Roadside Design; Earthwork; Traffic Flow and Capacity Analysis. Spring.

CIVL 419. Civil Engineering Projects. 3 Credits.

Individual student research or design projects, utilizing computer methods, experimentation and literature surveys. Proposal and report required. Under the sponsorship of a civil engineering faculty member; must be approved in writing by the Chairperson; for students of superior ability. Pre-requisite: CIVL 415, Senior Status.

CIVL 420. Bridge Engineering. 3 Credits.

Planning and design of highway bridge projects. Bridge Engineering will include analysis and design of both superstructure and substructure. Design will be based on LRFD and the specifics of bridge loading according to AASHTO specifications. Design project. One three-hour period. 3 credits. Pre-Reqs: CIVL309, 409, 410, 412 all with a grade of B or better.

CIVL 424. Essential Traffic Control. 3 Credits.

Traffic Control design for roadways and intersections. The history, design, and implementation of traffic control devices including markings, signs, signals, and Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS). Layout of text and pictograms for signs. Timing of static and actuated traffic signals, sensor placement, and intersection geometry. ITS components including fiber and wireless communication, cameras and monitors, and operational protocols. Efficient and automated toll collection methods. Two lectures (One on campus, one remote). Prerequisite: CIVL 202. Corequisite: CIVL 412.

CIVL 425. Airport Design. 3 Credits.

Airport design standards for airside operations based on aircraft characteristics. Topics include aircraft performance, airport layout, site location, wind analysis, runway geometric design, obstruction analysis, taxiway design, lighting/marking/signage, air traffic control and airfield pavement. Prerequisite: CIVL 202; Corequisite: CIVL 412.

CIVL 426. Advanced Pavement Engineering. 3 Credits.

Advanced pavement design methods including mechanistic, empirical and mechanistic-empirical methods; pavement distresses and distress survey methods; advanced destructive and non-destructive tests on asphalt mixtures to determine mechanistic properties and structural condition of pavement layers; pavement maintenance techniques and rehabilitation methods; Life-Cycle Cost Analysis for pavement structures.

CIVL 440. Special Topics. 1 Credit.

CIVL 498. Introduction to Professional Development: Seminar 3. 1 Credit.

A series of lectures and field trips designed to expose students to different facets of the Civil and Environmental Engineering profession. Material will cover current trends in the professional and research fields within the discipline, as well as closely associated disciplines. Students will write papers based on material covered. All three courses will be offered each semester. Students will be required to take all three courses in order to graduate. These courses are only open to Junior and Senior students in the Civil & Environmental Engineering undergraduate program. The cumulative credits in the three courses will count as a technical elective.

Civil and Environmental Engineering Courses

CEEN 303. Fluid Mechanics. 3 Credits.

Fluid properties; fluid statics; calculation of static forces on submerged objects; fluid flow; flow balances; derivation and application of the Bernoulli equation; analysis of pressure pipe systems; force of fluid; head loss; pipe friction losses; minor friction losses; open channel flow; rivers; road drainage; partially full pipes; fluid measurement. Three lectures. Fall. Must earn no grade lower than a C. Prerequisite: ENGS 206. Corequisite: CEEN 304.

CEEN 304. Fluid Mechanics Laboratory. 1 Credit.

Application and verification of principles of fluid mechanics. Three hours. Fall. Corequisite: CEEN 303.

CEEN 305. Energy & the Environment. 3 Credits.

Course involving the application of thermodynamics, mass balances and engineering principles to energy production, thermal pollution, air quality, climate change, resource recovery and sustainability. Specific topics include the thermodynamics of energy production, pollutant emissions, the Clean Air Act, meteorology, atmospheric transport of pollutants, the global energy balance, the energy water nexus, CO2 emissions and climate change, alternative energy supplies, energy conservation and resource recovery.Three lectures. Fall. Prerequisite: CHEM 102, ENGS 204.

CEEN 307. Hydraulic Design. 3 Credits.

Hydrology; river hydraulics; peak discharge estimation; detention basin design; water distribution systems; storm sewer design; sanitary sewer design. Four design projects: river flood and bridge analysis using HECRAS; storm sewer design for a subdivision using SWMM; water system design for a town using EPANET; sanitary sewer design for a subdivision using SWMM. Three credits. Two lectures, one two-hour project period. Spring. Must earn no grade lower than a C. Prerequisite: CEEN 303.

CEEN 308. Reliability Analysis in Civil and Environmental Engineering. 3 Credits.

Statistics, data analysis and inferential statistics, distributions, confidence intervals. Application of statistics and probability theory in civil engineering disciplines; structures, water resources, transportation, environmental, and geotechnical. Three lectures.Fall. Prerequisite: MATH 286 (or MATH 203), ENGS 230 with a minimum of C grade. Prerequisites: ENGS 230, MATH 286.

CEEN 309. Environmental Law. 3 Credits.

A course exploring a particular topic within United States Government. Specific topics vary and are announced by the Dept. This course is cross-referenced with GOVT325, Special Topics: U.S. Govt.

CEEN 401. Sustainable Water Resource Engineering. 3 Credits.

An examination of water resource issues at local, regional and global scales. Special emphasis will be placed on the effects of climate change on water resources, restoration of aquatic ecosystems, and methods of low-impact development and green infrastructure. The course will include an examination of water resources policy and regulation, sustainability principles and concepts, water issues in the developing world, water supply protection, approaches to flood damage control, watershed management and water quality. Control and emerging water resource issues in the New York City and the Tri-state areas will be used as case studies.

Environmental Engineering Courses

ENVL 316. Environmental Engineering Field Applications. 3 Credits.

Undergraduate combined lecture and laboratory course will introduce students to environmental analyses used in water and wastewater treatment processes, as well as field sampling techniques and sample analyses. Students will be introduced to the statistical analysis and interpretation of environmental data. Field trips to water and wastewater treatment plant sites included.

ENVL 406. Water and Wastewater Treatment Processes. 3 Credits.

Basic principles of groundwater hydrology and subsurface contaminant transport. Construction and use of flow nets; pumping well and aquifer response under confined and unconfined conditions. Contaminant sources, transport, adsorption and degradation; the behavior of contaminant (non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) in the subsurface. Design of groundwater extraction systems, subsurface cutoff walls, caps, and emerging technologies for soil treatment. Three lectures. Fall. Must earn a grade no less than a C. Prerequisites: ENGS 204, CEEN 303, CEEN 305.

ENVL 408. Environmental Engineering Design. 3 Credits.

Engineering design concepts applied to environmental facilities and infrastructure. The course may include the design of new or upgraded facilities such as water treatment plants, wastewater treatment plants, industrial treatment plants and hazardous waste treatment systems. All designs will include: data analysis to establish basis of design: process selection and sizing; plant layout and siting; major equipment and instrumentation selection and sizing; energy and chemical requirements; overall plant mass balances and cost analysis; hydraulic profile. Two lectures and one two-period design sessions. Spring. Prerequisites: ENGS 204, CEEN 305, CEEN 307, ENVL 406/ENVG 506 with a minimum C grade, Senior Status or permission of the Chair.

ENVL 410. Hazardous Waste Design. 3 Credits.

Fundamentals of hazardous waste management and treatment design. Includes review of current hazardous waste regulations, groundwater and air contaminant fate and transport concepts, and risk assessment. Primary focus on the treatment processes including air stripping of volatile compounds, bioremediation of contained aquifers and soils, and incineration. Emerging treatment technologies will also be presented. Spring.

ENVL 417. Environmental Law. 3 Credits.

ENVL 439. Environmental Engineering Projects. 1-3 Credit.

Environmental Engineering Projects Individual student research or design projects, utilizing computer methods, laboratory experimentation, field studies and literature surveys. Proposal and report required. Under the sponsorship of an environmental engineering faculty member. Must be approved in writing by the chair. For students of superior ability. Fall, Spring.

ENVL 505. Surface Water Quality Modeling. 3 Credits.

Principles governing the transport and fate of contaminants in rivers, streams, lakes and reservoirs. Water quality standards, transport processes, water quality modeling for water-borne disease, dissolved oxygen, and nutrient enrichment. Engineering controls to meet water quality objectives and case studies are presented. Computer solutions to some problems are required. Three lectures. Fall.

ENVL 507. Groundwater. 3 Credits.

Basic principles of groundwater hydrology and subsurface contaminant transport. Construction and use of flow nets; pumping well and aquifer response under confined and unconfined conditions. Contaminant sources, transport, adsorption and degradation; the behavior of contaminant (non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs)) in the subsurface. Design of groundwater extraction systems, subsurface cutoff walls, caps, and emerging technologies for soil treatment. Three lectures. Fall.

ENVL 517. Environmental Law. 3 Credits.

Introduction to legal aspects of environmental regulations. Historical perspectives and current regulation for air, land and water quality. Application of "cradle to grave" tracking. Three lectures. Fall.