Catalog
2013-14

Psychology

Dr. Jay Friedenberg
Chair of the Department

The Psychology Department offers a program that emphasizes both the humanistic and scientific aspects of psychology. The psychology major is designed for students:

  1. Who desire to study and understand human behavior,
  2. Who want to enter psychology as a profession, or
  3. Who regard psychology as a liberal arts preparation for further training in the professions. In order to meet the diverse needs of students, the Psychology Department offers both a B.S. and a B.A. degree and optional concentrations in Clinical/Counseling, Cognitive, Developmental, Industrial-Organizational, and Social Psychology. There is also a specific track for Education students concentrating in Psychology. These degrees and options are discussed in greater detail below.

The goals of the department are to provide students with the opportunity:

  • To learn psychological concepts, principles , theories, and research strategies.
  • To develop skills in analyzing, evaluating, and applying psychological principles and theories to their professional preparation and personal lives.
  • To conduct independent study, research, and internships.
  • To explore career opportunities in psychology and related areas.

Majors

Every student who wishes to declare a major in Psychology should consult with the Department Chair. Students must receive a minimum grade of C in a psychology course for the course to be credited to their major. Students who are considering graduate school should consult with faculty members during their junior year. All students interested in graduate study are advised to take the Graduate Record Examinations. As part of the department’s outcomes assessment initiative, all psychology majors may be required to complete a standardized psychology achievement exam during their senior year, as well as surveys measuring department and instructor effectiveness.

Requirements for a Major in Psychology

All students must complete 30 credits in Psychology for a B.A. and 33 credits in Psychology for a B.S. The B.S. also requires several additional credits in science as is described below. Specific requirements for each degree are as follows:

I. The Psychology Core

All psychology majors must complete the following four courses in order:

PSYC 150Roots: Psychology3
or PSYC 203 Introduction to Psychology I
PSYC 209Introduction to Psychology II3
PSYC 205Statistics3
PSYC 315Research Methods I3

Note: PSYC 150, 203, or 209 are prerequisite to all 300- and 400-level courses.

II. The Psychology Distribution

All Psychology majors must take one course from each of the following six fields in psychology:

Clinical/Counseling Psychology3
Abnormal Psychology *
Psychological Testing *
Social Psychology3
Social Psychology *
Theories of Personality *
Physiological Psychology3
Physiological Psychology
Sensation and Perception
Cognitive Psychology3
Cognition and Learning
Cognitive Science
Developmental Psychology3
Psychology of Childhood
Psychology of Adolescence
Adulthood and Aging
Applied Psychology3
Industrial Psychology
Organizational Psychology
Contemporary Psychotherapy
Health Psychology
Interviewing and Counseling
Forensic Psychology

*Students wishing to attend graduate school in clinical or counseling psychology are strongly advised to take these classes.

Additional requirements for a B.S. in Psychology

In addition to the requirement above, students seeking a B.S. in Psychology must complete the following requirements:

Permission of the Chairperson of Psychology to enter the B.S. program or a math SAT score of at least 600.

PSYC 322Advanced Research Methods3
The following science requirements:
BIOL 111
  & BIOL 113
General Biology I
   and General Biology Laboratory I
4
BIOL 112
  & BIOL 114
General Biology II
   and General Biology Laboratory II
4
BIOL 207Anatomy and Physiology (Co-requisite: BIOL 209 Lab) 3
BIOL 208Anatomy and Physiology II (Co-requisite: BIOL 210 Lab)3
One of the following:8
General Chemistry I
   and General Chemistry II
Introductory Physics I
   and Introductory Physics II

B.S. students are also encouraged, but not required, to take Genetics (BIOL 217 Genetics (Co-requisite BIOL 218 Lab)) and Neurobiology (BIOL 405 Neurobiology).

Requirements for Education students concentrating in Psychology

All Psychology/Education majors must complete the following courses:

PSYC 203Introduction to Psychology I3
PSYC 209Introduction to Psychology II3
PSYC 205Statistics3
PSYC 315Research Methods I3
PSYC 321Social Psychology3
PSYC 340Cognition and Learning3
or PSYC 329 Cognitive Science
PSYC 333Motivation and Emotion3

One of the following options:

Option A

EDUC 303Child and Adolescent Development3
Three of the following:9
Behavior Modification
Psychological Testing
Psychology of Developmental Disorders and Delays
Psychology of Family Relationships
Abnormal Psychology
Psychology of Women
Theories of Personality

Option B

PSYC 345Psychology of Childhood3
PSYC 346Psychology of Adolescence3
One of the following:3
Behavior Modification
Psychological Testing
Psychology of Developmental Disorders and Delays
Psychology of Family Relationships
Abnormal Psychology
Psychology of Women
Theories of Personality

Optional Concentrations

In addition to the requirements described above, students who wish to specialize in a specific area of psychology may do so by completing the requirements for one of the concentrations below. These concentrations are optional. Students are not required to complete a concentration.

Clinical/Counseling Psychology

PSYC 421Abnormal Psychology3
PSYC 302Psychological Testing3
PSYC 327Interviewing and Counseling3
PSYC 437Contemporary Psychotherapy3
One of the following:3
Research in Psychology
Research in Psychology
Advanced Research Methods
Internship
Internship

Social Psychology

PSYC 321Social Psychology3
PSYC 347Theories of Personality3
One of the following:3
Psychology of Family Relationships
Psychology of Women
Group Dynamics
One of the following:3
Research in Psychology
Research in Psychology
Advanced Research Methods
Internship
Internship

Developmental Psychology

PSYC 345Psychology of Childhood3
PSYC 346Psychology of Adolescence3
PSYC 320Adulthood and Aging3
One of the following:3
Psychology of Developmental Disorders and Delays
Research in Psychology
Research in Psychology
Advanced Research Methods
Internship
Internship

Industrial/Organizational Psychology

PSYC 373Industrial Psychology3
PSYC 374Organizational Psychology3
PSYC 302Psychological Testing3
One of the following:3
Motivation and Emotion
Health Psychology
Group Dynamics
One of the following:3
Research in Psychology
Research in Psychology
Advanced Research Methods
Internship
Internship

Cognitive Psychology

PSYC 340Cognition and Learning3
PSYC 329Cognitive Science3
PSYC 333Motivation and Emotion3
One of the following:3
Research in Psychology
Research in Psychology
Advanced Research Methods
Internship
Internship

 Requirements for a Minor in Psychology

15 approved credits, including PSYC 203 Introduction to Psychology I or PSYC 150 Roots: Psychology and any 12 additional credits. Students wishing to minor in Psychology must consult with the Chair of the department.

 

 

 

Courses

PSYC 150. Roots: Psychology. 3 Credits.

An explanation and critical examination of selected concepts in the social sciences. Students examine the logic and methods of social science research and engage in analysis of contemporary social issues from the perspective of the discipline of psychology. (Not open to students who have completed PSYC 203.).

PSYC 203. Introduction to Psychology I. 3 Credits.

A survey of the fundamental concepts of the science of human and animal behavior, emphasizing human development, learning and memory, psychological testing, personality, and abnormal behavior. Not open to students who have taken LLRN 123 or PSYC 150.

PSYC 205. Statistics. 3 Credits.

Application and interpretation of descriptive and inferential statistics. Topics include measures of central tendency and variability, correlation and regression, student's t-tests, and analysis of variance. Statistical computer packages will be used for data analysis. Prerequisite: PSYC 209.

PSYC 209. Introduction to Psychology II. 3 Credits.

This course will provide students with a fundamental grasp of the application of the scientific method to the study of psychology. Topics incude research methodology, biological bases of animal and human behavior, intelligence, problem solving, motivation and emotion. Prerequisite: PSYC 150 or PSYC 203.

PSYC 216. Behavior Modification. 3 Credits.

A survey of the principles of learning as applied to selected problems of behavior.

PSYC 257. Forensic Psychology. 3 Credits.

An analysis of psychological causes of criminal behavior. Topics include antisocial personality, neuropsychological components of criminality, and the interface between psychology and law in areas such as jury selection, sentencing, the insanity plea, eyewitness testimony, and psychiatric evaluation of defendants.

PSYC 302. Psychological Testing. 3 Credits.

A survey of the various tests available to psychologists, including intelligence, achievement, aptitudes, and personality tests. The student is not trained for clinical interpretations. Prerequisite: PSYC 205.

PSYC 310. Psychology of Developmental Disorders and Delays. 3 Credits.

This course provides an overview of developmental disorders, delays, and psychopathology among children. The course will emphasize assessment, diagnosis, and treatment. Students may be expected to perform field activities and child observations. Prerequisite: PSYC 345.

PSYC 315. Research Methods I. 3 Credits.

This course examines the application of the scientific method in psychology, focusing on the experimental approach. Laboratory exercises, library research, and writing research reports are required. Prerequisite: PSYC 205.

PSYC 318. Research Methods in Cognition. 3 Credits.

An examination of research methods, particularly the experiment, and theoretical approaches to the human process of cognition: perception, memory, thinking, problem solving, and decision-making. Experimentation in these areas and laboratory reports are required. Prerequisite: PSYC 315.

PSYC 320. Adulthood and Aging. 3 Credits.

This course will examine the physical, social, emotional, intellectual alterations occurring in adulthood and old age. The fundamental research and theories explaining the stages and developmental tasks of adulthood will be described and evaluated.

PSYC 321. Social Psychology. 3 Credits.

A study of the processes by which the behaviors, thoughts, and feelings of the individual are influenced by his/her social environment. Topics include: social perception and attribution, attitude development and change; interpersonal attraction and interpersonal relations such as friendship.

PSYC 322. Advanced Research Methods. 3 Credits.

Examines research methods and techniques in a specialized area of psychology such as cognitive, clinical/counseling, developmental, or social. Specialty area will vary and be announced. Prerequisite: PSYC 315.

PSYC 327. Interviewing and Counseling. 3 Credits.

Indepth exploration of techniques for establishing a stable working relationship with a client; examination of prominent contemporary approaches to interviewing and counseling from theoretical and practical standpoints.

PSYC 329. Cognitive Science. 3 Credits.

Cognitive science is the scientific interdisciplinary study of mind. Surveys major theories of mind from different perspectives, including philosophy, psychology, neuroscience, networks, evolution, linguistics, artificial intelligence, and robotics.

PSYC 330. Special Topic: In Psychology. 3 Credits.

New course offerings in any area of psychology. Descriptions of specific topics will be posted in the psychology department. Specific requirements will depend upon the topic.

PSYC 333. Motivation and Emotion. 3 Credits.

An introduction to human motivation and its interaction with emotions, surveying the research and theories of motivational states such as hunger, sex, affiliation, and aggression and of emotions such as love, fear, and anger.

PSYC 340. Cognition and Learning. 3 Credits.

The course surveys the fundamental operations of the mind as viewed from an information processing perspective. Attention, perception, the representation of knowledge, memory, problem-solving reasoning and language are studied.

PSYC 341. Health Psychology. 3 Credits.

The study of the psychological processes that affect health with a focus on stress and stress management. Topics include: psychological analysis of health-promoting and health-compromising behaviors and psycho-biological perspectives on pain management, chronic illness, and terminal illness.

PSYC 342. Psychology of Family Relationships. 3 Credits.

The study of love, intimacy, and commitment in traditional and non-traditional families. Topics include: dating, communication, sexuality, and parenting.

PSYC 343. Psychology of Women. 3 Credits.

The major objective of this course is to develop an understanding of and critical thinking about the psychology of women. Topics unique to women's lives, such as menstruation, pregnancy, childbirth, and motherhood, will be explored. Additional topics including gender and sexual development, work roles, abuse, violence, and body image will be analyzed.

PSYC 344. Group Dynamics. 3 Credits.

This course will investigate how and why groups form and how they are maintained. In addition, topics including group influence, stereotypes, prejudice, decision-making, and conflict will be explored.

PSYC 345. Psychology of Childhood. 3 Credits.

Study of the physical, mental, emotional and social development of the child from conception to adolescence.

PSYC 346. Psychology of Adolescence. 3 Credits.

Study of the physical, mental, emotional and social development of the adolescent.

PSYC 347. Theories of Personality. 3 Credits.

An examination of the research and theories explaining the development of personality and its functioning.

PSYC 360. Independent Study. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to allow psychology majors to pursue an area of special interest in psychology. Students must present a preparatory outline to qualify. Permission of the faculty mentor, department chair, and the Dean of the School of Arts are required at the time of registration.

PSYC 367. Sensation and Perception. 3 Credits.

This course explores how we see and hear. Topics include: color vision, object perception, perception of depth, size, and motion. Particular attention is paid to Gestalt psychology and the perception of illusions and ambiguous figures.

PSYC 373. Industrial Psychology. 3 Credits.

The application of psychological principles and methods to the study of individuals and groups in the workplace. Topics include: personnel selection, placement, and evaluation; training and development; and human factors engineering.

PSYC 374. Organizational Psychology. 3 Credits.

An analysis of human behavior in organizations. Topics include organizational structures and dynamics, motivation and job satisfaction, management styles, and problems in human relations.

PSYC 375. Internship. 3 Credits.

Students participate in an off-campus training experience closely related to their area of study. Frequent meetings with the internship advisor and a paper are required. Internships are arranged through the Center for Career Development and must be approved in advance by the chair and the Dean of the School of Arts. Offered fall semester.

PSYC 421. Abnormal Psychology. 3 Credits.

The course surveys a variety of psychological disorders ranging from anxiety to depression and schizophrenia. Current theories regarding their causes are discussed and compared. Approaches to treating the disorders are also covered with particular emphasis on the psychotherapies and associated behavioral techniques.

PSYC 429. Research in Psychology. 3 Credits.

Supervised participation in research design, data collection, statistical analysis, and interpretation of results in conjunction with ongoing research projects in psychology. Permission of the faculty mentor, the department chair, and the Dean of the School of Arts are required at the time of registration.

PSYC 430. Research in Psychology. 3 Credits.

Supervised participation in research design, data collection, statistical analysis, and interpretation of results in conjunction with ongoing research projects in psychology. Permission of the faculty mentor, the department chair, and the Dean of the School of Arts are required at the time of registration.

PSYC 435. Physiological Psychology. 3 Credits.

An analysis of the biological factors underlying behavior with emphasis on anatomy and functions of the nervous system. Topics include: behavioral genetics and the neurophysiological substrates of learning, motivation, and abnormal behavior. Fall. Spring.

PSYC 437. Contemporary Psychotherapy. 3 Credits.

Contemporary forms of psychotherapy are discussed and critically evaluated including psychoanalysis, behaviorism, Gestalt, and humanistic therapies.

PSYC 460. Independent Study. 1-3 Credit.

This course is designed to allow psychology majors to pursue an area of special interest in psychology. Students must present a preparatory outline to qualify. Permission of the faculty mentor, department chair, and the Dean of the School of Arts are required at the time of registration.

PSYC 475. Internship. 3 Credits.

Students participate in an off-campus training experience closely related to their area of study. Frequent meetings with the internship advisor and a paper are required. Internships are arranged through the Center for Career Development and must be approved in advance by the chair and the Dean of the School of Arts. Offered spring semester.

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