Catalog
2018-19

Liberal Arts - General Information

Students seeking entry to health professions schools are encouraged to enroll in the pre-health concentration. Students are not required to join the concentration in order to receive a HPACcommittee evaluation letter; however, participation is recommended in order to be included in the competitive cohort that applies to health professions schools each year.
 

Historical Note

Since its founding, Manhattan College has sought to broaden the intellectual horizons of its students while preparing them for the various professions. The School of Liberal Arts supports Manhattan College's tradition of liberal inquiry, reflection on faith in relation to reason, emphasis on ethical conduct and commitment to social justice by offering diverse foundation courses for all students, no matter their school or major. In addition, the School of Liberal Arts furthers Manhattan's emphasis on high academic standards by offering challenging majors in the humanities and social sciences and innovative interdisciplinary majors. These include courses taught by outstanding teacher-scholars committed to the advancement of knowledge in their classrooms and in their disciplines. Courses and majors emphasize the skills of analysis and criticism that are central to an understanding of the contemporary world, providing students with the informational and ethical base for that understanding and the written and oral skills necessary for its critique and communication. The faculty of Liberal Arts seeks to provide the broad, flexible, and thoughtful education essential for students to develop professionally, live successful and rewarding lives, and contribute effectively to a rapidly changing society.

The Curriculum

The faculty of the School of Liberal Arts offers a program of education that provides students with the opportunity for a life of continuing growth and development in the twenty-first century. The core of the program is entitled The Roots of Learning. Its development was supported by a generous grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Foundation courses include composition, modern language, religious studies, science, and mathematics. Students then proceed to studies of the modern age through courses in the humanities and social sciences. The program is structured to provide a common learning experience for all students in Liberal Arts.

The Core: The Roots of Learning

The Roots of Learning represents a commitment to an educational program that judiciously combines content and process. The program seeks to:

  • Equip students with the intellectual skills essential to a productive professional life of learning and leadership

  • Immerse students in the traditions of humanism, the sciences, and the social sciences

  • Provide the global perspective essential to living and growing in our ever smaller, but increasingly complex, world

  • Develop critical reasoning and analytical skills through an intensive study of fundamental texts

School of Liberal Arts Core Curriculum Requirements

All first-year students in the School of Liberal Arts take one First Year Seminar in Fall and one in Spring semester. One seminar should be in the humanities and one in the social sciences. These seminars, which are designated by the number 151, are small discussion-based and writing-intensive courses that meet the School of Liberal Arts Core Curriculum Requirements. 

General Requirements

College Writing (a first-year requirement)3
Religious Studies9
The Nature and Experience of Religion
Nature & Experience of Religion-FYS
A course in Catholic Studies
A course in Global Studies or Contemporary Issues
Modern Language (a full year requirement of the same language; placement by Modern Languages Department)6
Mathematics (course requirement dependent upon program specifications)3
Science (Select three of the following courses): *9
Great Ideas in Physics
Chemistry in the Modern World
Introduction Astronomy
Introduction Geology
Topics in Science I
Topics in Science II
Introduction Meteorology
Introduction to Biology
Global/Non-Western
Two courses from the total required for graduation must focus on global and/or non-western topics
Computer Proficiency
Computer proficiency in the area of major concentration demonstrated by passing a test on entrance or taking a computer course
Total Credits30

Roots of Learning Core Requirements

LLRN 102Classical Origins: West Culture3
or LLRN 151 Classical Origins of Western Culture-1st Year Seminar
The Roots of the Social Sciences (students choose three courses from the following four disciplines):9
Roots: Economics *
Roots: Government
Roots:Government - FYS
Roots: Psychology
Roots: Psychology - FYS
Roots: Sociology
Roots: Sociology - FYS
The Roots of the Modern Age (students take English, History, Philosophy, and either Art or Music):12
Roots: Literature
Roots:Literature-1st Year Seminar
Roots: History
Roots: History - FYS
Roots: Philosophy
Roots of Modern Age: Philosophy - FYS
Roots: Art
Roots:Art -1st Year Seminar
Roots: Music
Roots:Music-1st Year Seminar
Total Credits24

The Major

A major is an extensive and detailed study of a particular discipline or a coherent combination of disciplines. Each student in Liberal Arts selects a major field of study. It is chosen on the basis of the individual’s interests, educational and career goals, and abilities. Double majors are possible with careful planning, but students are encouraged to take as many elective courses as possible.

In Liberal Arts, the areas of specialization from which a student selects a major include the following fields:

  • Art history
  • Communication
  • Economics
  • English
  • French
  • History
  • Philosophy
  • Political Science
  • Psychology
  • Religious Studies
  • Sociology
  • Spanish

In addition, five interdisciplinary majors are available to students in Liberal Arts:

  • Environmental Studies
  • International Studies
  • Labor Studies
  • Peace and Justice Studies
  • Urban Studies

These programs are designed to enhance a student's knowledge of a particular area of study not easily confined to a traditional academic department and to help the student develop an ability to address multiple perspectives.

Requirements for the major fields are listed under the department or program.

Students may not take more than 42 credits in their major without the permission of the Department Chair and the Dean. There is a residency requirement in the major for all transfer students: no more than 12 credits (9 credits in Communication) may transfer toward the major. Students are encouraged to develop a minor or a cluster.

Minor Fields of Study

Minors may be earned in all departments and major programs offered by the School of Liberal Arts and in some interdisciplinary areas such as Catholic Studies, Ethics, Film Studies, Medieval Studies, and Women and Gender Studies. Minimum grade requirements for the minor are the same as those for the major. A minor consists of 15 credits. The same course cannot be used to satisfy the requirements of both a major and a minor.

Students in Liberal Arts may pursue minors in other schools at Manhattan: in Computer Information Systems, Finance, General Business, Management, and Marketing in the School of Business; a general Education minor without state certification in the School of Education & Health; or a minor in Science or in a specific Science or in Mathematics or Computer Science. Students must earn a grade of C or better in all courses taken for the minor in these schools. Students generally take no more than fifteen credits in Business or Education.

Electives

Most programs in Liberal Arts include the opportunity for a student to select particular electives to meet individual needs. Often elective courses are selected on the basis of their relationship to the student’s major field of study; they also enable students to develop a minor field of study, to structure a second major, or to explore new areas of knowledge. Electives should not be selected without serious consideration. Students are advised to consult regularly with their advisors concerning their electives.

Students generally take no more than fifteen credits in Business, Education, Science, or Engineering. Any courses taken in these programs must be approved by the appropriate chair. Students interested in exercising any of these options must consult with the Academic Advisor in the School of Liberal Arts.

Please note: Credits earned in Aerospace Studies may not be used for any degree program in Liberal Arts. Students may not take more than three credits total in health and physical education courses.

Student Course Load

Students may not take more than eighteen credits in the Fall or the Spring semester without the written approval of the Dean of Liberal Arts. Students may not take more than three credits in the January or May intersession or the summer session without the written approval of the Dean of Liberal Arts.

Bachelor of Science in General Studies

The curriculum for the degree program in General Studies is an alternative to the usual undergraduate curriculum. It features an area of concentration rather than a major, and three areas of lesser concentration. Consequently, there is less specialization, but opportunity for broader and more structured general education. Each program provides core requirements in English, fine arts, history, mathematics and science, philosophy, psychology, religious studies, and sociology as a foundation for self-enrichment, appreciation, and understanding. The basic core requires forty-eight credits, including nine credits in religious studies.

A student is required to take one area of greater concentration (a minimum of eighteen credits beyond the core curriculum) in one of the following areas:

  • Art history
  • Biology
  • Chemistry
  • Computer science
  • Economics
  • Education
  • English
  • French
  • History
  • International studies
  • Mathematics
  • Peace and Justice Studies
  • Philosophy
  • Physics
  • Political Science
  • Psychology
  • Religious studies
  • Sociology
  • Spanish
  • Urban studies

No language courses at the 100-level count in the greater concentration and no more than two 200-level courses or six credits of AP may count toward the greater concentration. Students must achieve a grade of C or better in all courses in the greater concentration.

In addition, a student must follow three areas of lesser concentration (a minimum of twelve credits each beyond the core curriculum) in fields other than the area of greater concentration. Fields of lesser concentration may be selected from the following areas:

  • Accounting
  • Applied science
  • Art history
  • Business (general)
  • Biology
  • Chemistry
  • Computer science
  • Computer information systems
  • Economics
  • Education
  • Engineering
  • English
  • Fine arts
  • French
  • General science
  • History
  • International studies
  • Japanese
  • Management
  • Marketing
  • Mathematics
  • Peace and Justice Studies
  • Philosophy
  • Physics
  • Political Science
  • Psychology
  • Religious studies
  • Sociology
  • Spanish
  • Urban studies

No language courses at the 100-level count in the lesser concentration and no more than two 200-level courses or six credits of AP may count toward the lesser concentration. Students must achieve a grade of C or better in all courses in the lesser concentrations.

The balance of the program will include electives. A student’s program should not include electives that exceed twenty-four credits in the field of greater concentration or eighteen credits in the fields of lesser concentration. No more than 18 credits in any combination may be taken in courses offered by the Schools of Business, Education, or Engineering, including courses taken in a concentration. No more than 3 credits may be taken in Physical Education and/or Health Education combined. Credits earned in Aerospace Studies do not count toward graduation in this program. Students in this program must take at least 75 credits in the liberal arts and sciences.

Academic Advising

All freshmen and those sophomores who have not yet declared a major are advised by the Academic Advisor for the School of Liberal Arts. Students who have chosen their major are advised by the Chair of their department or their assigned delegate. Transfer students plan their first semester with the Academic Advisor.

Study Abroad Opportunities

The School of Liberal Arts encourages students to broaden their educational horizons by participating in foreign study programs. In order to participate in such a program a student must have a minimum cumulative index of 2.75.

Arts is affiliated with the American Institute for Foreign Study and is also associated with the Institute for European Study and its campuses world-wide. Foreign study opportunities are available in many countries.

Further information about these and a wide range of other study abroad opportunities is available through the Director for International Programs, Professor Nevart Wanger, or the Coordinator of Study Abroad, Mrs. Nancy Cave. All foreign study programs must be approved by the Office of the Dean of Liberal Arts after consultation with the Director for International Programs.

Credit for Off-Campus Courses

Once matriculated into a degree-granting program (major) at Manhattan College (College), a student may not take off-campus courses offered by another accredited institution for transfer to the College without prior written approval from the student’s academic advisor and the student’s dean. A maximum of 12 credits may be taken in off-campus courses after matriculation.  Each school may set limitations on what types of courses may or may not be approved for its students that are consistent with the College’s overall requirements. 

Credit for courses taken at other institutions by matriculated students of Manhattan College will be recognized under the following conditions:

  1. Required courses in a major or in a minor may not be taken off-campus except in extenuating circumstances and with compelling reasons, and with the approval of the chair of the major or minor program.
  2. Only courses from accredited two- and four-year colleges and from accredited universities will be considered.
  3. Written approval to take courses with departmental or school course numbers is obtained in advance.  First, the chair of the department offering the course at Manhattan must approve the off-campus course based on the equivalency or substitutability of the course.  Second, the Dean of the student’s school must approve the off-campus course based on the chair’s assessment and other circumstances. On-line courses are acceptable if approved.  Approval to take courses without departmental or school course numbers may be approved by the dean.
  4. The required form and transcript are filed with the Registrar and the required fee is paid to the Bursar.
  5. The grade received at the other institution must be equivalent to or higher than the Manhattan College grade of C.
  6. Grades earned at other institutions will not be transferred to the student’s record at Manhattan College.
  7. Study-abroad courses do not count toward the 12-credit maximum.
  8. The required nine (9) credits of Religious Studies courses – RELS 110, a 200-level course in Catholic Studies, and a 300-level course from Global Studies and Contemporary Issues – are at the core of the Lasallian heritage of the College.  Generally, these courses will be taken on-campus.  These courses are offered in both in-class and online formats by the College.  A required RELS course may be taken off-campus if the RELS program does not offer enough openings in the course.  Any exceptions will only be permitted for one of the three-credit RELS courses and as part of the overall 12 credits allowed.  Any RELS course taken off-campus to meet the nine credit hour requirement will require review for equivalency or substitutability by the dean of the School of Liberal Arts before approval by the student’s dean.
  1. Each School may adopt additional guidelines to meet specific accreditation or curricular requirements for its programs.

This policy will come into force starting the 2017-2018 academic year for all students enrolled at that time and subsequently.

Honor Societies and Research Opportunities

The faculty of Liberal Arts, in order to encourage and reward the development of serious scholarship among its students, have established on campus a number of national honor societies. Chief among these are Phi Beta Kappa and Sigma Xi.

Phi Beta Kappa, founded in 1776, is dedicated to the ideal of excellence in scholarship in the liberal arts and sciences and is widely regarded as a mark of the highest distinction. The Manhattan College Chapter, the Upsilon of New York, was chartered in 1971. Students elected to Phi Beta Kappa are chosen from among those students who have achieved general scholastic excellence.

Sigma Xi is a national honor society founded in 1886 that encourages original research in the pure and applied sciences. Students are elected to membership on the basis of their accomplishments in research and their enthusiasm for continued scientific investigation.

In addition, most academic departments sponsor local chapters of national honor societies in their disciplines. The faculty are dedicated to encouraging student research efforts and are pleased to have students join them in their own research. Indeed, one of the hallmarks of Manhattan College is the frequency with which students and faculty join together in research projects.

Independent study courses are available in most departments for students seeking the opportunity to do advanced-level study with a faculty member in an area not ordinarily covered by regular coursework. In addition, many departments sponsor supervised internships and field-study opportunities through the department or through the Cooperative Education Program.

Of special note are the Branigan Scholars Grants. These grants, established in 1967 through the generous contributions of Edward Vincent Branigan ’40 with matching gifts from major corporations and support from the National Endowment for the Humanities, provide summer stipends for students pursuing research projects independent of their course work.

Internships

Opportunities for off-campus work experiences that carry course credit toward graduation are available to juniors and seniors in the School of Liberal Arts through internship courses offered by departments and programs. Internship courses are numbered 375 or 475. Frequent meetings with the internship advisor and a paper are required. Internships are arranged through the Center for Career Development and must be approved in advance by their chair or advisor and by the Dean of the School of Liberal Arts.

Graduate Awards and Fellowships

Manhattan College is among a small, select group of American Colleges sending large numbers of students on to graduate schools. To continue this tradition, the college has developed programs to assist students seeking information about graduate programs and particularly about fellowships and scholarships for graduate study. Further information is available from the Center for Graduate School and Fellowship Advisement and from the departmental chairs.

Prelegal Advisory Committee

Students interested in entering law school should seek guidance through the Prelegal Advisory Committee. In addition to personal interviews, the Committee conducts group meetings to advise students on specialized fields of law. The Committee also makes information available on requirements for admission to law schools, the availability of scholarships, and special opportunities in the legal profession. Further information is available from Professor Patricia Sheridan of the School of Business.

Health Professions Advisory Committee

The Health Professions Advisory Committee is a body of faculty members from several schools who give guidance to students interested in preparing for careers in medicine, dentistry and allied fields. The Committee advises students on the selection of programs of study that will furnish them with specialized pre-professional courses in the sciences and with a broad liberal education to prepare them for effective participation in the health-care community. Further information is available from the Office of the Chair of the Health Advisory Committee, Dr. Bruce Liby of the Physics Department.

Preparation for Medicine and Dentistry

Requirements are established by the Association of American Medical Colleges, the American Dental Association, and other professional associations in the health field. The pre-professional requirements in the sciences are met within the context of a broad liberal education. Pre-professional students are expected to maintain an average of at least a B in their science courses.

The minimum required courses for admission to professional schools are:

BIOL 111
BIOL 112
General Biology I
and General Biology II
8
BIOL 113
BIOL 114
General Biology Laboratory I
and General Biology Laboratory II
0
CHEM 101
CHEM 102
General Chemistry I
and General Chemistry II
6
CHEM 319
CHEM 320
Organic Chemistry I
and Organic Chemistry II
6
CHEM 323
CHEM 324
Organic Chemistry Laboratory I
and Organic Chemistry Laboratory II
4
ENGL 110First Year Composition3
6 Credits of MATH are required.
Students should take:
MATH 155Calculus for the Life Sciences I3
MATH 185Calculus I3
MATH 187Honors Calculus I3
MATH 230Elementary Statistics3
Optional 2nd MATH course
MATH 156Calculus for the Life Sciences II3
MATH 186Calculus II3
MATH 188Honors Calculus II3
PHYS requirements:
PHYS 101
PHYS 191
Physics I
and Physics I Lab
4
PHYS 102
PHYS 192
Physics II
and Physics II Lab
4
OR
PHYS 107
PHYS 197
Introduction to Physics I
and Introduction to Physics I Lab
4
PHYS 108
PHYS 198
Introduction to Physics II
and Introduction to Physics II Lab
4
Highly Recommended:
CHEM 433Biochemistry I3
BIOL 319Cellular BioChemistry/Physiology4
PSYC 150Roots: Psychology3
or SOC 150 Roots: Sociology

Specific schools may require or recommend other courses.

At least one course each in Biochemistry, Psychology, and Sociology are highly recommended by all medical [and dental] schools.

Students seeking entry to health professions schools are encouraged to enroll in the pre-health concentration. Students are not required to join the concentration in order to receive an HPAC committee evaluation letter; however, participation is recommended in order to be included in the competitive cohort that applies to health professions schools each year.

Outline of Course Requirements Leading to a Bachelor of Arts Degree with a Major in the Humanities or the Social Sciences Excluding Psychology

First YearCredits
LLRN 1023
Roots Humanities or Social Sciences19
SCI23
Language both semesters36
RELS 1103
ENGL 1103
MATH43
 30
Second YearCredits
Roots Humanities or Social Sciences19
SCI26
Catholic Studies3
Major and/or Elective12
 30
Third YearCredits
Roots Humanities or Social Sciences16
RELS Global Studies/Contemporary Issues3
Major and/or Elective21
 30
Fourth YearCredits
Major and/or Elective30
 30
Total Credits: 120

Note: Students pursuing a B.A are required to complete at least 99 credits in the Liberal Arts and Sciences.

Outline of Course Requirements Leading to a Bachelor of Arts Degree with a Major in Psychology

First YearCredits
PSYC 2143
LLRN 1023
ENGL 110 (first or second semester)3
RELS 1103
MATH first or second semester43
Roots Humanities or Social Sciences first or second semester26
PSYC 1503
Language both semesters16
 30
Second YearCredits
PSYC 3143
PSYC 4143
Roots Humanities or Social Sciences26
PSYC Applied3
Catholic Studies3
Electives6
SCI36
 30
Third YearCredits
PSYC Social/Developmental6
RELS Global Studies/Contemporary Issues3
SCI33
Electives15
Roots Humanities or Social Sciences23
 30
Fourth YearCredits
PSYC Clinical/Cognitive/Physiological9
Electives21
 30
Total Credits: 120

Note: Students pursuing a B.A. are required to complete at least 99 credits in the Liberal Arts and Sciences.

Outline of Course Requirements Leading to a Bachelor of Science Degree with a Major in Psychology

First YearCredits
LLRN 1023
Language both semesters16
One of the following groups8
 
 
ENGL 110 (first or second semester)3
MATH 185 or 2303
PSYC 1503
PSYC 2143
 29
Second YearCredits
One of the following groups8
PSYC 3143
BIOL 207
BIOL 208
8
RELS 1103
PSYC 4143
 
 
Electives3
Roots Humanities or Social Sciences26
 34
Third YearCredits
Roots Humanities or Social Sciences212
Catholic Studies3
Electives3
PSYC Applied/Developmental/Psychological/Social12
 30
Fourth YearCredits
Electives18
PSYC Cognitive/Clinical9
RELS Global Studies/Contemporary Issues3
 30
Total Credits: 123

Summary of Course Requirements Bachelor of Science - General Studies

ENGL 110First Year Composition3
ENGL Elective 13
One of the following:3
Advanced First Year Composition
Written Communication
Introduction to Creative Writing
Advanced Composition
Grammar and Writing
HIST Elective3
GOVT Elective3
Three courses from SCI, MATH or CMPT9
FINE ARTS Elective3
RELS (110, Catholic Studies, and Global Studies/Contemporary Issues9
SOC Elective3
PHIL Elective3
PSYC Elective3
Field of Greater Concentration 218
Three Fields of Lesser Concentration 336
Seven courses chosen as free electives 421
Total Credits120
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