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Education & Health - General Information

Karen Nicholson, Ph.D., Dean
Loretta Wilkins, M.A., Assistant Dean

Historical Note

Teacher preparation began at Manhattan College in the late 1800’s. By 1921, the College was offering programs for the preparation of Sisters and Brothers of the Christian Schools. In 1964, a Division of Teacher Preparation was established with responsibility for programs leading to teacher certification and, in 1970, was extended to a School of Education & Health. As of 2001, the School of Education & Health has included Undergraduate Education Programs leading to New York State teaching certification at the Childhood and Adolescent levels as well as a Dual Certification Program in Childhood/ Special Education or Adolescence/ Special Education. Downward extension for certificates in early childhood education, and upward or downward extensions in Middle Childhood Education are also available. In addition, the School offers a Five-Year Program in Childhood Education and Adolescence Education/Special Education leading to a B.S. in Childhood Education or Adolescence Education and an MSED in Special Education with certification in each. Additional undergraduate programs include the Department of Kinesiology which includes Physical Education Teaching, Exercise Science, and Public Health, and the Department of Radiologic and Health Professions which includes Radiation Therapy Technology, Nuclear Medicine Technology. Graduate Programs are available in School Counseling, Mental Health Counseling, Marriage and Family Therapy, Special Education, School Building Leadership (SBL). and Special Education and SBL are part of the Education Department.  In 2005 and again in 2010, the teacher preparation programs received accreditation from the Teacher Education Accreditation Council (TEAC) and are currently accredited through the Council for the Accreditation of Education Programs, CAEP. Their next accreditation is being pursued through AAQEP, Association for Advancing Quality in Educator Preparation.

Objectives

In the tradition of Saint John Baptist de La Salle, the “Patron of all Teachers,” the School of Education & Health prepares dedicated professionals for careers in teaching and allied health services. A strong liberal arts and sciences education emphasizes effective communication, scientific literacy, and multi-cultural awareness. Coursework and practical experiences in Education provide those skills necessary for work in a school or clinical setting. The School seeks to develop broadly educated teachers and health service professionals who possess competencies necessary for certification in their area of study or for graduate study.

The Teacher Preparation Programs at Manhattan College simultaneously meet the requirement of the college for excellence in the Liberal Arts and Sciences, academic concentrations and pedagogy; as well as standards established by New York State for teacher certification. The programs are designed to be consistent with the LaSallian tradition of excellence in teaching, respect for individual dignity, and commitment to social justice principles, on which the college was founded.

The goal of the Education and Health Faculty is the preparation of professional educators who are reflective, scholarly and committed to the education of all learners. Students examine the theoretical foundations of learning and teaching in relation to psychological, philosophical, historical and sociological issues. This theoretical foundation is applied to the practice of teaching and learning as students engage in field-based experiences in the context of a diverse, contemporary educational environment. The total Manhattan College experience is designed to prepare graduates who are self-directed learners, effective teachers, informed professionals and caring human beings committed to the education of all learners.

Curricula

A strong core of liberal arts and science courses is central to all programs in Education and Health. Each Teacher Preparation Program has three components: the core requirements in the liberal arts and sciences; an academic concentration and the professional education component of the program. Physical Education and Radiological and Health Professions Programs include those courses that provide necessary professional expertise. All students in Education and Health complete a culminating experience of student teaching, professional practicum, or clinical internship in which they are expected to display the ability to apply knowledge gained through previous course work and field experiences. The curricula of the Childhood Education, Adolescent, Dual-Childhood/Adolescence Special Education, and Physical Education Programs are designed for undergraduate students who are pursuing their degrees full-time. 

Advising

Students in the Childhood Education, Adolescence Education, and Dual-Childhood or Adolescence Education/Special Education, and Physical Education Programs have at least two assigned advisors in their Departments: an academic advisor and an education faculty advisor. Students have a third advisor in the content specialization or concentration area (i.e., English, Math). Each student receives a checklist of courses required for graduation based on his/her education program and content specialization.

Students are required to meet with their education faculty advisor to discuss individual academic and professional progress, and course scheduling each semester. Once students have met with and receive the signature of their Faculty Advisor they must then submit their schedule to the Academic Advisor for approval.

While department faculty provide advisement, the student is ultimately responsible for academic and professional decisions. Please note that it is very important for the student to take the recommended number of credits each year in order to avoid an over-charge at a later time. If a student is struggling in a course, it is highly recommended that the student meet with the course instructor and also his/her advisor for support, and avoid having to withdraw from the course. 

1.The Educational Faculty Advisor provides guidance through the program and consultation related to professional issues. This may include selecting an academic concentration, identifying appropriate electives or discussing graduate school or  employment options. The education advisor is the sole faculty advisor for students who choose a General Studies content specialization.
2. The Academic Advisor for the School of Education & Health oversees course scheduling for registration. The academic advisor also monitors students’ compliance with requirements for all undergraduate certification programs, the College’s academic standards, and New York State teacher certification.
3. The Content Specialization Faculty Advisor provides guidance to assure that the student takes the required courses in her/his content specialization area and offers assistance in selecting the most appropriate electives for each student. Some Content Specialization advisers also sign the course registration along with the academic advisor for the School of Education & Health.

Criteria for Formal Admission into Teacher Education Program

1. Successfully complete English 110 with a grade of C+ or higher;
2. Successfully complete core Math requirements with grades of “C” or higher;
3. Complete two required Education courses from the following list with grades of C or higher for the two courses (Educ 201, Educ 202, Educ 206, Educ 301 or Educ 318);
4. Have an overall Grade Point Average of 2.75 and a minimum average of 2.5 or higher in the academic concentration(s);
5. Successfully complete Kinesiology 110 with a grade of C or higher;

6. Applicant's disposition assessments will be reviewed, as will faculty comments on Jasper Connect and in the applicant's program folder. In addition, Undergraduate Education faculty will be invited to comment on each applicant's professional dispositions as part of their application.

Students applying for formal admission into teacher education can receive one of three responses:

1. Unconditional admittance into the Program. The student who successfully meets  all criteria, is formally admitted into the Program, and may proceed with the program of studies.

2. Conditional admittance into the Program. The student who has met most criteria will be eligible for unconditional admittance by the end of the following semester and may continue and enroll in education courses for that semester. At the end of the conditional semester the student automatically advances to unconditional admittance if all criteria are met. If the conditions are not met, the student will not be allowed to take additional upper division education courses until unconditional status is achieved. The student must reapply if unconditional status is not met by the end of the conditional semester.

3. Denied admittance into the Program. If a student has a number of deficiencies    that will take longer than one semester to correct, the application will be denied. The student will not be allowed to continue with education classes until conditional admittance is achieved. When conditional admittance status is achieved the student must meet the criteria listed under conditional admittance. The student in this category must reapply for admission to teacher education when the criteria are met and documented.

Note: Students who do not achieve unconditional or conditional admittance into the Education Program by the end of the second year may take longer than four years to complete the program. The above criteria are designed for students who indicate their intent to pursue Education when they enter Manhattan College as first-year students and follow the prescribed program. Internal and external transfer students will be evaluated on an individual basis for entrance into the program and must meet all criteria.

Requirements for student teaching

To register for student teaching, a student must meet the following School requirements:

1. Enrollment in the School;
2. Cumulative GPA of 2.75 or higher is required;
3. A GPA of 2.75 or higher is also required in Education courses and 2.5 for academic concentration(s) coursework;
4. Senior status required at the time of the student teaching or professional practicum semester;
5. Recommendation of the Chair of the Department or Program Director;

6. Applicant's disposition assessments will be reviewed, as will faculty comments on Jasper Connect and in the applicant's program folder. In addition, Undergraduate Education faculty will be invited to comment on each applicant's professional dispositions as part of their application;

7. The student teaching applicant may not have more than two academic concentration courses and one pedagogical concentration course to complete after student teaching.

Note. Required exams for New York State teacher certification are: Educating All Students Test, Content Specialty Test, and the edTPA portfolio-assessment. Students also pursuing certification in Students with Disabilities must take a second Content Specialty Test in special education. Students who desire to teach in other states should check with the State Education Department of the specific state in which they want to teach and register for the appropriate State-mandated tests.

Students already graduated from the School may not register for undergraduate student teaching, professional practicum or clinical internship.

Teacher Certification

The School of Education & Health has been approved by the New York State Education Department to offer approved programs leading to the initial certificate. Certification can be achieved in the following fields: 

Childhood Education, (grades 1-6)

Extension for Early Childhood Education (birth - grade 2)

Childhood Education and Students with Disabilities (grades 1-6)

Adolescence Education, (grades 7-12)

Extension for Middle Childhood (grades 5-9 for Adolescence Education majors; Grades 7-9 for Childhood Education majors)

Adolescence Education and Students with Disabilities (grades 7-12)

Physical Education (grades k-12)

The initial certificate is valid for five years, beginning the first year the individual is employed as a teacher. In order for a student to be recommended by the Dean for initial certification, the following requirements must be met:

1. Completion of all course work ("the approved program") with a cumulative index of 2.75 or higher;
2. A passing grade in all courses;
3. A grade of “C” or higher in all Education and concentration course work; Please   note that the cumulative and Education grades GPAs must be at least 2.75;
4. Completion of the New York State Education Department approved program of   teacher preparation in the certification area;
5. Successful completion of appropriate New York State Teacher Certification   Examinations: EAS, CST (s) and electronic portfolio the edTPA.
6. Completion of the online application for certification and payment of required   fees;
7. Recommendation of the Dean of Education, the state certifying officer; and
8. Payment of all outstanding fees owed to the college.

Note: Candidates for NYS certification are responsible for knowing and meeting NYS requirements related to the specific certification they seek. Any changes in NYS requirements take precedence over those in this catalog.

Transfer Students

Students in good academic standing (minimum GPA of 2.75) and possessing a desire for teaching or health services will be accepted for transfer to School of Education & Health Programs from any program in the College after their first semester of study. Only those courses in which the student has received a “C” or higher are transferable.

Transfer students from other accredited colleges who meet the requirements for admission at Manhattan College will be considered for transfer to School of Education & Health Programs. Courses comparable to those required in the School of Education & Health and in which the student achieved a minimum grade of “C” are transferable.

Education Minor (does not lead to teacher certification)

Course List

EDUC 201 Principles and Practices of Education                  3 Credits

EDUC 202 Psychology of Adolescent Education                   3 Credits

OR

EDUC 303 Psychology of Childhood Education                     3 Credits

Three courses from the following options:

EDUC 301 Nature and Needs of Students with Disabilities    3 Credits
EDUC 360 Language and Literacy                                          3 Credits
EDUC 402 Reading in the Content Area                                 3 Credits
EDUC 406 Social  Relations in the Classroom                        3 Credits

Total Credits                                                                             15 Credits

Enrichment

Students are encouraged to participate in co-curricular activities that enrich their program of study. Co-curricular activities may increase cultural awareness, knowledge in subject content, and skills in communication. Campus activities of a religious, cultural, and academic nature offer opportunities for self-expression such as forums, dramatics, public speaking and publications.

Honors

Students who maintain a 3.5 or higher index may, after their first semester, be invited to participate in the Honors Program of the Schools of Liberal Arts, Education, and Science. This program offers additional cultural and intellectual experiences to those students demonstrating academic excellence.

In addition to the scholastic honors offered by the College, students in Education are eligible for membership in national honor societies. Students pursuing teacher education are eligible after sophomore year for selection into the Mu Sigma Chapter of Kappa Delta Pi if they meet the criteria established by the society. Students in the Department of Physical Education may be invited to join the Alpha Eta Chapter of Phi Epsilon Kappa during their sophomore year. Students in the Radiological and Health Sciences may qualify for admission to Alpha Beta Gamma after their junior year.

Job Opportunities for Teacher Education Graduates

According to the National Center for Education Statistics’ Predicting the Need for Newly Hired Teachers in the U.S., there is a need for more teachers. The U.S. Department of Education also reports teacher shortages throughout the country.

Study Abroad

Students interested in studying abroad should discuss their interest with the Academic Advisor by the second semester of freshman year. Students may opt to study abroad for either a full semester or on one of the College’s short-term programs during the winter intersession or summer break. If planning to go abroad for a full semester, it is best to plan the semester of study abroad for the second semester of sophomore year or the first semester of junior year. Further information about study abroad opportunities is available through the Study Abroad Office.

 

Programs of Study for Childhood, Adolescent, and Dual Childhood/ Special Education

The first year of the program emphasizes courses in the liberal arts and sciences. The remaining three years of each program are arranged by developmental level (childhood or adolescence) according to the subject area the student is preparing to teach. If the student follows his/her prescribed program plan, requirements for graduation and initial teacher certification can be achieved in four years.

Courses

EDUC 201. Principles and Practices of Education. 3 Credits.

Current issues in education; the process of becoming an educator; historical and philosophical foundations of education; legal and ethical responsibilities of educators, parents, and community; the organization and financing of schools; implications of the multicultural nature of schools; the role of technology in the teaching and learning process; the state of education in the United States and the world, 15 fieldwork hours is required as follows: childhood and dual 15 hours at any level; adolescent 15 hours in a 7-9 classroom. Open only to students matriculated in this school or those who have formally declared a minor in Education.

EDUC 202. Psychology of Adolescent Education. 3 Credits.

This course explores issues in learning and cognition from theoretical and research-based perspectives related to children and adolescents; the social, moral, and emotional development of school-aged children; definitions of intelligence; the influence of culture, race, ethnicity, gender, and socioeconomic status on teaching and learning; the evolution and research foundation of special education; the uses of technology in the learning, teaching, and research processes; and the application of research to the analysis of pedagogical practices and learning. Includes 15 hours of field work experience in a 10-12th grade classroom. Open to Adolescence Education and Physical Education majors, or by permission of the instructor.

EDUC 205. Theory and Practice. 3 Credits.

This course explores the decision to become a teacher; characteristics of effective teachers and the development of a sense of community and respect for one another. Theoretical and technical dimensions of teaching and learning; the complexity of the educational environment; the profession itself, and issues in education. 12 field work hours is required as follows: 6 hours in grades 1-3 and 6 hours in grades 4-6. Open only to Childhood Education majors.

EDUC 206. Planning & Assessing for Learning in Secondary Schools. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on the study of instructional planning and assessment that supports middle and high school students in meeting learning goals by drawing upon knowledge of content areas based on New York State Standards. Participants create sequenced learning experiences that are appropriate for curriculum goals and content standards learning targets, align objectives with developmentally appropriate formative and summative assessments, and design lesson plans and assessments that meet the needs of all learners. Prerequisite: EDUC 201.

EDUC 300. Fieldwork. 0 Credits.

Students complete fieldwork experience hours, in which they observe and participate in educational settings with teachers and/or supervisors, and school-age students.

EDUC 301. Nature and Needs of Students with Disabilities. 3 Credits.

An overview of historical social and legal foundations of special education. Examination of the etiology and characteristics of individuals with disabilities under Individuals with Disabilities Education Act and from multicultural and multilingual backgrounds. Emphasis on standards for special populations. assistive technology; modification and accommodation of curriculum. interdisciplinary collaboration. educational and vocational programs; placement alternatives; and an exploration of community services which support the students and family. 20 hours of fieldwork experience required in a classroom in grades 1-6 (for Childhood Education majors) or grades 10-12 (for Adolescence Education majors). Prerequisite EDUC 201.

EDUC 303. Psychology of Childhood Education. 3 Credits.

This course explores issues in the physical, social, moral, and emotional development of children and adolescents. Emphasis is placed on major theories and research related to understanding normal development, individual differences, and assessment of those differences. Topics include definitions of intelligence; the influence of culture, race, ethnicity, gender, and socioeconomic status on teaching and learning; the evolution and research foundation of special education; the uses of technology in the learning, teaching, and research processes; and the application of research to the analysis of pedagogical practices and learning. Open only to Childhood Education majors, Physical Education majors, or those who have formally declared a minor in education.

EDUC 311. Teaching and Learning w/ Tech. 3 Credits.

In this course, students explore various uses of technology in the classroom. Students will gain technical proficiency in using hardware and software commonly found in classrooms today and apply best practices for using these tools effectively to enhance teaching and learning. Students will develop strategies for using technology toward a wide range of teaching practices, including communication, assessment, classroom management, etc. In addition, the design and facilitation of technology-related student-centered projects and learning experiences, will be explored. Prerequisites: EDUC 201 and EDUC 318.

EDUC 318. Curriculum and Pedagogy in the Elementary Classroom. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on the development and application of skills, strategies, and reflection associated with the art and science of teaching, through an examination of various New York State standards and of the relationship between annual, unit and lesson planning for teaching in the diverse, elementary classroom. Clinical simulations, including videotaping presentations, will be used to develop skills in planning, presenting and assessing learning. Prerequisite: EDUC 201. Co-requisite (only for transfer students).

EDUC 353. Integrated Learning Grades 1-3. 3 Credits.

This course examines developmentally appropriate, integrated curriculum for grades 1-3. The course focuses on methods and materials, appropriate practices, strategies for supporting diverse learners and children with special needs, effective techniques for assessing teaching and learning, and the use of technology and computers to enhance learning and instruction. Includes 30 hours of field work experience in a Ist-3rd grade classroom. Prerequisite: EDUC 318.

EDUC 354. Integrated Learning Grade 4-6. 3 Credits.

This course examines developmentally appropriate, integrated curriculum for grades 4-6. The course focuses on methods and materials, appropriate practices, strategies for supporting diverse learners and children with special needs, effective techniques for assessing teaching and learning, and the use of technology and computers to enhance learning and instruction. Includes 30 hours of field work experience in a 4th-6th grade classroom. For adolescence education majors seeking the downward extension, field placement must be in a middle school. Prerequisite: EDUC 318 or EDUC 206.

EDUC 355. Assessment of Learning and Behavior Grades 1-6. 3 Credits.

Study of standardized, formal, informal, ongoing, and alternative measures used in the assessment of at risk and disabled populations with emphasis on the areas of reading in the content area of social studies. Ways to report and use assessment information is reflected through instructional planning in inclusive and special education classrooms along with strategies to communicate assessment information to parents. 20 hours field work required in a special education setting. Open only to students matriculated in the school of Education.

EDUC 356. Assessment and Remediation of Math and Science Grades 1-6. 3 Credits.

This course will focus on management of assessment and instructional skills and competencies needed to provide effective remediation based on information gathered through assessment of students in inclusive special education settings, individually or in groups. Emphasis is on methods and strategies for standards based instruction with a focus in the areas of mathematics, science, and the arts. 20 hours of fieldwork experience required in a special education setting. Open only to students matriculated in this school.

EDUC 357. Curriculum Adaptation. 3 Credits.

This course provides students with the opportunity to use information gathered through assessment, adapt instruction and identify appropriate pedagogical strategies for the special education and at-risk students in inclusive and self-contained classrooms. Emphasis is placed on NYS standards for content, Universal Design for Learning, instructional adaptations for individual and group settings, and the use of technology to enhance learning. Open to Childhood Education majors. Prerequisite: Formal admission to student teaching and Senior status.

EDUC 358. Curriculum Adaptation for Secondary Students with Special Needs. 3 Credits.

This course is designed to help students enhance their basic understanding of principles and practices related to addressing academic ability and cultural diversity in the classroom. This course will focus on ways to identify and acknowledge student variance, differentiate instruction, create a responsive classroom environment, develop instructional and management strategies and utilize Universal Design for learning in conjunction with state standards. The course will assist pre-service teachers in developing approaches to modify content, process and products of mixed ability classrooms, address the varied readiness and needs of learners through developmentally appropriate practice, and to use technology to enhance learning. This course will emphasize NYS learning standards. 15 hours of fieldwork experience are required in a special educatIon setting. Pre-requisites: Senior status and EDUC 301.

EDUC 360. Language and Literacy. 3 Credits.

This course provides an introduction to language acquisition and literacy development by native English speakers and students who are English language learners. Techniques for developing listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills are emphasized. Includes 15 hours of field work experience in a 7-9 classroom. Prerequisites: For Adolescence Education majors: EDUC 206; For Kinesiology Majors: KIN 213 or KIN 305.

EDUC 375. Theoretical Foundations of Teaching and Learning in the Middle School Grades 7-9. 3 Credits.

This course studies the physical, cognitive, social and emotional development of the middle school adolescent. Application of diverse instructional strategies including integrated curriculum, interdisciplinary teaching, and teaming of students and teachers. 30 hours field required in middle school. Prerequisites: For Childhood Education program majors seeking upward extension: EDUC 318, EDUC 402, EDUC 354. For Adolescence Education majors seeking downward extension: EDUC 360, EDUC 403.

EDUC 376. Curriculum and Methods of Teaching English Grades 7-12. 3 Credits.

This course covers curriculum, methods and materials for effective integration and multidisciplinary approaches for teaching English Language Arts; application of learning theory and the use of developmentally appropriate practices; and strategies for teaching and assessing learning of diverse students. Students will develop English lessons for grades 7-12. For Childhood Education Majors seeking upward extension, 30 fieldwork hours are completed in a middle school setting. For Adolescence Education majors,30 hours of fieldwork experience are required: 15 hours in a middle school and 15 hours in a secondary school. Prerequisites: For Childhood Education majors: EDUC 354. For Adolescence Education majors: EDUC 206 and EDUC 360.

EDUC 377. Curriculum and Methods of Teaching Social Studies Grades 7-12. 3 Credits.

This course covers curriculum, methods and materials for effective integration and multidisciplinary approaches for teaching social studies; application of learning theory and the use of developmentally appropriate practices; and strategies for teaching and assessing learning of diverse students. Students will develop social studies lessons for grades 7·12. For Childhood Education majors seeking upward extension, all fieldwork hours are completed in a middle school setting. For Adolescence Education majors, 30 hours of fieldwork experience are required; 15 hours in a middle school and 15 hours in a secondary school. Prerequisites: For Childhood Education majors: EDUC 354. For Adolescence Education majors: EDUC 206 and EDUC 360.

EDUC 378. Curriculum and Methods of Teaching Mathematics Grades 7-12. 3 Credits.

This course covers curriculum. methods and materials for effective integration and multidisciplinary approaches for teaching mathematics; application of learning theory and the use of developmentally appropriate practices; and strategies for teaching and assessing learning of diverse students. Students will develop lessons in mathematics for grades 7-12. For Childhood Education majors seeking upward extension, all fieldwork hours are completed in a middle school setting. For Adolescence Education majors, 30 hours of fieldwork experience are required: 15 hours in a middle school and 15 hours in a secondary school. Prerequisites: for Childhood Education majors: EDUC 354; for Adolescence Education majors: EDUC 206 and EDUC 360.

EDUC 379. Curriculum and Methods of Teaching Foreign Language Grades 7-12. 3 Credits.

This course covers curriculum, methods and materials for effective integration and multidisciplinary approaches for teaching foreign language; application of learning theory and the use of developmentally appropriate practices; and strategies for teaching and assessing learning of diverse students. Students will develop lessons in foreign language for grades 7-12. For Childhood Education majors seeking upward extension, all fieldwork hours are completed in a middle school setting. For Adolescence Education majors, 30 hours of fieldwork experience are required: 15 hours in a middle school and 15 hours in a secondary school. Prerequisites: for Childhood Education majors: EDUC 354; for Adolescence Education majors: EDUC 206 and EDUC 360.

EDUC 380. Curriculum and Methods of Teaching Science Grades 7-12. 3 Credits.

This course covers curriculum, methods and materials for effective integration and multidisciplinary approaches for teaching science- biology, chemistry, and physics; application of learning theory and the use of developmentally appropriate practices; and strategies for teaching and assessing learning of diverse students. Students will develop science lessons for grades 7-12. For Adolescence Education majors, 30 hours of fieldwork experience are required: 15 hours in a middle school and 15 hours in a secondary school. Prerequisites: EDUC 206 and EDUC 360.

EDUC 400. Special Topics. 3 Credits.

An intensive study of a topic relevant to curriculum and pedagogy. The subject to be studied will vary from semester to semester. A student may elect this course as often as twice for college credit, presuming a different topic each time.

EDUC 401. Principles and Practices of Reading in Elementary School. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on the principles of development and learning underlying reading instruction as part of the total communication process (listening, speaking, reading and writing). Methods for diverse learners in grades 1-6; materials, testing, procedures and computer applications. 20 hours of field experience required: 10 in grades 1-3, 10 in grades 4-6. Must be taken before Student Teaching.

EDUC 402. Reading in Content Area. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on teaching for comprehension in the content areas through reading and writing. Emphasis is placed on methods of teaching vocabulary, comprehension, study skills, and writing. Assessment of individual differences of general and special needs students as a basis for providing appropriate instruction. Includes 10 hours of field work experience.

EDUC 403. Reading in Content Area Secondary Education. 3 Credits.

Teaching for critical literacy to construct meaning in the content areas through reading and writing of expository text. Emphasis placed in methods of evaluating and integrating literacy teaching including vocabulary, comprehension, study skills and writing. Assessment of individual differences of general and special needs students as a basis for providing appropriate literacy instruction. 10 hours of field required in grades 7-12. Open to adolescent majors only. Prerequisite: EDUC 376, or 377, or 378, or 379, or 380.

EDUC 404. Assessment & Remediation for the Secondary Student with Special Needs. 3 Credits.

This course will consider educational assessment as a process of gathering and analyzing information in order to plan meaningful instruction, to evaluate interventions, to select appropriate learning curricula and materials, and to make appropriate educational decisions for students who are at-risk or disabled primarily in the content areas of language arts and mathematics. Students will utilize standardized format, informal, ongoing and alternative measures used in the assessment of students who are at- risk and disabled, with an emphasis on reading in the content areas of social studies, mathematics and science. Ways to report and use assessment information are reflected through instructional planning in inclusive and special education classrooms along with strategies to communicate assessment information to parents. 20 hours of fieldwork experience will be provided as part of the course. Prerequisite; EDUC 301.

EDUC 406. Social Relations in the Classroom Social Relations in the Classroom. 3 Credits.

This course investigates the ways in which racism, sexism, economic injustice, heterosexism, ageism, ableism and other forms of discrimination influence classroom interaction as well as impacting educational access and opportunities for youth. Informed by social justice theory and the Lasallian mission of the College, coursework considers what individuals and communities can do to ensure that all students have equitable access to high quality education. Open only to Education majors or those who have formally declared a minor in Education. Prerequisite: EDUC 201.

EDUC 408. Management of Behavior and Learning for At-Risk and Disabled. 3 Credits.

Study of biological, behavioral, psychosocial, humanistic and cognitive approaches to classroom management and instruction; emphasis on the application of strategies and methods for students with behavior and learning problems in the mainstream and special education setting; methods of developing social skills. Services in the school and community that strengthen partnerships with families are examined. (10 hours) Field observation required. Open only to students matriculated in this school, or those who have formally declared a minor in Education. This course satisfies the New York State Dignity for All Students Act (DASA) teacher licensing requirement.

EDUC 418. Seminar, Observation and Student Teaching in Elementary School, Grades 1-3. 3 Credits.

Participation in a seminar, student teaching in a general education setting, and teaching students in grades 1-3. Students seeking NYS certification in Childhood Education or Childhood Education and Students with Disabilities will be mentored by a college supervisor and cooperating teacher. Taken with EDUC 438 (grades 4-6) or EDUC 446 (special education grades 4-6) for semester-long, full time student teaching. Seminar is in discussion and lecture format, covering special topics related directly to teaching. Resume and interviewing preparation included. Prerequisites: Senior status with a minimum, cumulative GPA of 2.75, a minimum GPA of 2.75 in the education courses and a minimum GPA of 2.5 in area(s) of concentration. Formal admission to student teaching; approval by Chair of Education. Student teaching is full-time. Prerequisites: EDUC 353 and EDUC 354 and EDUC 401 Corequisite: EDUC 438 or EDUC 446.

EDUC 438. Seminar, Observation and Student Teaching in Elementary Grades 4-6. 3 Credits.

Participation in a seminar, student teaching in a general education setting, and teaching students in grades 4-6. Students seeking NYS certification in Childhood Education or Childhood Education and Students with Disabilities will be mentored by a college supervisor and cooperating teacher. Taken with EDUC 418 (grades 1-3) or EDUC 444 (special education grades 1-3) for semester-long, full time student teaching. Seminar is in discussion and lecture format, covering special topics related directly to teaching. Resume and interviewing preparation included. Prerequisites: Senior status with a minimum, cumulative GPA of 2.75, a minimum GPA of 2.75 in the education courses and a minimum GPA of 2.5 in area(s) of concentration. Formal admission to student teaching; approval by Chair of Education. Student teaching is full-time. Prerequisites: EDUC 353 and EDUC 354 and EDUC 401 and EDUC 402 Corequisite: EDUC 418 or EDUC 444.

EDUC 440. Education of the Young Child. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on the nature and needs of culturally and linguistically diverse young children (birth to eight years). Pertinent legislation, foundations, assessment and curriculum methods will include collaboration with professionals and families. Trends and issues of advocacy will be studied within the context of the continuum of service delivery and developmentally appropriate practice. 50 hours of fieldwork experience are required (Birth - K). Prerequisites: EDUC 353, EDUC 354, EDUC 401, and EDUC 402. Please note that to earn the Early Childhood Extension, the elementary student teaching experience must occur in either a first or second grade classroom. Prerequisites: EDUC 353 and EDUC 354 and EDUC 401 and EDUC 402.

EDUC 442. Early Childhood Student Teachi. 3 Credits.

The early childhood student teaching experience and related seminar provide an opportunity to apply knowledge, skills, and strategies related to teaching and learning in a classroom setting. Each student’s field experience is guided by a certified teacher and by a college supervisor. Students will develop teaching competencies while experiencing the personal and professional roles of a teacher. The seminar is an opportunity for students and faculty to discuss current issues and ideas related to early childhood education and to examine the relationship between these ideas and what they are experiencing in the classroom. This course requires 20 full days of student teaching in a Birth - K context. Prerequisites: EDUC 440. Please note that to earn the Early Childhood Extension, the elementary student teaching experience must occur in either a first or second grade classroom.

EDUC 444. Seminar, Observation and Student Teaching in Special Education. 3 Credits.

Participation a seminar, student teaching in a special education or inclusive setting, and teaching students with disabilities in grades 1-3. Students seeking NYS certification in Childhood Education and Students with Disabilities will be mentored by a college supervisor and cooperating teacher. Taken with EDUC 438 (grades 4-6) for semester-long, full time student teaching. Seminar is in discussion and lecture format, covering special topics related directly to teaching. Resume and interviewing preparation included. Prerequisites: Senior status with a minimum, cumulative GPA of 2.75, a minimum GPA of 2.75 in education courses, and a minimum GPA of 2.5 in area(s) of concentration. Formal admission to student teaching; approval by Chair of Education. Student teaching is full-time. Prerequisites: EDUC 353, EDUC 354 and EDUC 401 Corequisite: EDUC 438.

EDUC 446. Seminar, Observation and Student Teaching in Special Education, Grades 4-6. 3 Credits.

Participation in a seminar and student teaching in a special education or inclusive setting and teaching students with disabilities in grades 4-6. Students seeking NYS certification in Childhood Education and Students with Disabilities will be mentored by a college supervisor and cooperating teacher. Taken with EDUC 418 (grades 1·3) for semester long, full time student teaching. Seminar is in discussion and lecture format, covering special topics related directly to teaching. Resume and interviewing preparation included. Prerequisites: Senior status with a minimum, cumulative GPA of 2.75, a minimum GPA of 2.75 in education courses, and a minimum GPA of 2.5 in area(s) of concentration. Formal admission to student teaching; approval by Chair of Education. Student teaching is full-time. Prerequisites: EDUC 353 and EDUC 354 and EDUC 401 and EDUC 402 Corequisite: EDUC 418.

EDUC 453. Seminar, Observation and Student Teaching Grades 7-9. 3 Credits.

Participation in student teaching and seminar in grades 7-9. Students seeking NYS certification in Adolescence Education will be mentored by a college supervisor and cooperating teacher. Taken with EDUC 454 (grades 10-12) or EDUC 456 (special education grades 10-12) for semester-long. full time student teaching. Seminar is in discussion and lecture format, covering special topics related directly to teaching. Resume and interviewing preparation included. Prerequisites: Senior status with a minimum, cumulative GPA of 2.75, a minimum GPA of 2.75 in the education courses and a minimum GPA of 2.5 in area of concentration. Formal admission to student teaching; approval by Chair of Education. Student teaching is full-time. Prerequisites: EDUC 376 or EDUC 377 or EDUC 378 or EDUC 380 Corequisites: EDUC 454 or EDUC 456.

EDUC 454. Seminar, Observation and Student Teaching Grades 10-12. 3 Credits.

Participation in student teaching and seminar in grades 10-12. Students seeking NYS certification in Adolescence Education will be mentored by a college supervisor and cooperating teacher. Taken with EDUC 453 (grades 7-9) or EDUC 455 (grades 7-9) for semester-long, full time student teaching. Seminar is in discussion and lecture format, covering special topics related directly to teaching. Resume and interviewing preparation included. Prerequisites: Senior status with a minimum, cumulative GPA of 2.75, a minimum GPA of 2.75 in the education courses and a minimum GPA of 2.5 in area of concentration. Formal admission to student teaching; approval by Chair of Education. Student teaching is full-time. Prerequisites: EDUC 376 or EDUG 377 or EDUC 378 or EDUC 380 Corequisites: EDUC 453 or EDUC 455.

EDUC 455. Sem: Observation & Practice Tchg. Adol/Sp. Ed.Grades 7-9. 3 Credits.

Participation in a seminar, student teaching in a special education or inclusive setting, and teaching students with disabilities in grades 7-9. Students seeking NYS certification in Childhood Education and Students with Disabilities will be mentored by a college supervisor and cooperating teacher. Taken with EDUC 454 (grades 10-12) for semester-long, full time student teaching. Seminar is in discussion and lecture format, covering special topics related directly to teaching. Resume and interviewing preparation included. Prerequisites: Senior status with a minimum, cumulative GPA of 2.75, a minimum GPA of 2.75 in education courses, and a minimum GPA of 2.5 in area(s) of concentration. Formal admission to student teaching; approval by Chair of Education. Student teaching is full-time. Prerequisite: EDUC 376 or EDUC 380 Corequisite: EDUC 454.

EDUC 456. Sem: Observation & Practice Tchg. Adol/Sp.Ed.Grades 10-12. 3 Credits.

Participation in a seminar, student teaching in a special education or inclusive setting, and teaching students with disabilities in grades 10-12. Students seeking NYS certification in Adolescence Education will be mentored by a college supervisor and cooperating teacher. Taken with EDUC 453 (grades 7-9) for semester-long, full-time student teaching. Seminar is in discussion and lecture format, covering special topics related directly to teaching. Resume and interviewing preparation included. Prerequisites: Senior status with a minimum, cumulative GPA of 2.75, a minimum GPA of 2.75 in the education courses and a minimum GPA of 2.5 in area of concentration. Formal admission to student teaching; approval by Chair of Education. Student teaching is full-time. Prerequisites: EDUC 376 or EDUC 377 or EDUC 378 or EDUC 380 Corequisites: EDUC 453.